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I am creating a class called Team. How can I get two objects to point to each other as Partners? Here is what I have been working on thus far. I have tested it with just the boolean data field and I know the rest of my program works so far.

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

 class Team
{
    public:

    Team();
    Team(bool prac, Team *part);
    Team *partner;
    bool practiced;
    void createPairing (Team *t1, Team *t2);
};


Team::Team()
{
    practiced = false;
    partner = 0;
}

Team::Team(bool prac, Team *part)
{
    practiced = prac;
    partner = part;
}

void Team::createPairing (Team *t1, Team *t2)
{
    t1->partner = t2;
    t2->partner = t1;
}

int main()
{
    Team Harry;
    Team Ron;
    Team *p1 = &Harry;
    Team *p2 = &Ron;
    Team createPairing(p1, p2);

    cout << Harry.partner << endl;
    return 0;
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

createPairing should be static:

static void createPairing(Team* t1, Team* t2);

Other than that, the problem is that when you do Team createPairing(p1, p2);, you're not actually calling the createPairing function, you're calling the second constructor implicitly. It's creating a Team called createPairing and converting p1 to a bool. (There should be a warning for this when you compile assuming you have warnings on.)

After you make the createPairing function static, this is how you would call it:

Team::createPairing(&Harry, &Ron);
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Thanks for your advice. The following is still returning 0 for the partner, though. When I tried to place static void in the function declaration, my compiler gave me an error saying that static can only be specified in the class definition. That is, I defined static void (createPartner) in the class definition, but I can't do the same for when defining the function. –  Elaine B Mar 27 '13 at 15:49
    
@AnnVeal Yes, you just do it on the declaration inside the class. –  Joseph Mansfield Mar 27 '13 at 15:51
    
Only use static inside the class. When you write the implementation of the function, you shouldn't use static. –  Mohammad Ali Baydoun Mar 27 '13 at 15:54
    
Thanks, I did that. However, it's still returning 0 for the partner after I use the function and print cout << Harry.partner << endl; –  Elaine B Mar 27 '13 at 15:58
    
Could you pastebin (pastie.org) the updated code? (So we're on the same page) –  Mohammad Ali Baydoun Mar 27 '13 at 16:01

If you want to have two parameters for pairing you should make that a free function (outside the class). Otherwise I suggest to omit the first parameter (it's "this" from the objects' point of view). Both will help to prevent the error for which magtheridon96 already provided the fix.

void Team::createPairing (Team *other)
{
    partner = other;
    other->partner = this; // here, making the member private and providing a setter would be better
}

or, as a free function (with setter)

void createPairing(Team& lhs, Team& rhs) // use references to avoid potential pointer issues
{
    lhs.setPartner(&rhs);
    rhs.setPartner(&lhs);
}
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Thank you, this was very helpful. –  Elaine B Mar 27 '13 at 18:45
    
Could you pls. vote up, if possible? –  ogni42 Mar 28 '13 at 14:11
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

class Team
{ 
    public:

    Team();
    Team(bool prac, Team *part);
    Team *partner;
    bool practiced;
    static void createPairing (Team *t1, Team *t2);
};


Team::Team()
{
    practiced = false;
    partner = 0;
}

Team::Team(bool prac, Team *part)
{
    practiced = prac;
    partner = part;
}

void Team::createPairing (Team *t1, Team *t2)
{
    t1->partner = t2;
    t2->partner = t1;
}

int main()
 {
    Team Harry;
    Team Ron;
    Team *p1 = &Harry;
    Team *p2 = &Ron;
    Team::createPairing(p1, p2);


    return 0;
}
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