Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I want to have a new line in my bquote envrionment, how can I do this?

my code:

test<-c(1,2,3,4,4.5,3.5,5.6)
test2<-0.033111111
plot(test,c(1:length(test)))

segments(4,0,4,23,col="red",lwd=2)
text(5, 4.5, labels = bquote(Qua[0.99] == .(round(test2,4))),col="red", cex = 1.4)

And I want to have a new line after the equal sign, so this should give:

VaR_0.99 =

0.03311

and not

    VaR_0.99 = 0.03311

I tried it with lines, but it did not work:

    test<-c(1,2,3,4,4.5,3.5,5.6)
    test2<-0.033111111
    lines<-list(bquote(Qua[0.99] == ),bquote(.(round(test2,4))))
    plot(test,c(1:length(test)))

    segments(4,0,4,23,col="red",lwd=2)
    text(5, 4.5, labels =lines ,col="red", cex = 1.4)
share|improve this question

migrated from stats.stackexchange.com Mar 27 '13 at 16:04

This question came from our site for people interested in statistics, machine learning, data analysis, data mining, and data visualization.

    
Have you read this or this‌​? –  plannapus Mar 27 '13 at 16:13
    
I tried it with lists, but it did not work! @plannapus –  Stat Tistician Mar 27 '13 at 16:14
1  
You cannot have a trailing "==". Need to put something: either phantom(0)` or " " after the ==. –  BondedDust Mar 27 '13 at 16:20
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

One of the errors was noted above. The other one was more a semantic error than a syntactic one. You need to give an explicit y location for the second bquote expression:

test<-c(1,2,3,4,4.5,3.5,5.6)
test2<-0.033111111
lines<- c( expression(Qua[0.99] == phantom(0)) ,
           bquote(.(round(test2,4)))
          )
plot(test,c(1:length(test)))

segments(4,0,4,23,col="red",lwd=2)
text(5, c(4.5, 4), labels =lines ,col="red", cex = 1.4)

enter image description here

I have used the atop suggestion myself in the past, even suggesting it on Rhelp, but I think the approach above generalizes better to three or more expressions and allows more control over positioning. atop also silently reduces font sizes, so if you went the nested atop route for a three expression task, it might need to be atop( atop(..., ...), atop(..., phantom() ) to keep the sizes uniform.

share|improve this answer
add comment

For instance, using atop:

test<-c(1,2,3,4,4.5,3.5,5.6)
test2<-0.033111111
plot(test,c(1:length(test)))

segments(4,0,4,23,col="red",lwd=2)
text(5, 4.5, 
     labels = bquote(atop(Qua[0.99] == phantom(), .(round(test2,4)))),
     col="red", cex = 1.4)

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.