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I'm trying to make a minimal working example for Django. This should be a single file which allows models to be defined and instantiated in an in-memory database, and which can then be used for stackoverflow questions. If possible, I'd like it to use the django/unittest framework, because this would make it simple to demonstrate problems with model behaviour.

There are many questions on Stackoverflow which would benefit from having something like this.

What I've managed so far:

# Django Minimal Working Example
# (intended) usage: save as `mwe.py` and run `python mwe.py`

# Settings
from django.conf import settings
settings.configure(DATABASES = {
        'default': {'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.sqlite3', 'NAME': ':memory:'}
        })

# Models
# with help from http://softwaremaniacs.org/blog/2011/01/07/django-micro-framework/en/
from django.db import models
import sys

sys.modules['mwe.mwe'] = sys.modules[__name__]
sys.modules[__name__].__name__ = 'mwe.mwe'
__package__ = 'mwe.mwe'

class Book(models.Model):
    isbn = models.IntegerField()

# Make a database and do things to it
from django.utils import unittest
from django.test import TestCase

class TestCreateObjects(TestCase):

    def setUp(self):
        book = Book.objects.create(isbn='9780470467244')

    def test_sanity(self):
        self.assertEqual(Book.objects.count(), 1)

unittest.main()

This script gets as far as running the unittest, but raises the error django.db.utils.DatabaseError: no such table: mwe_book.

Edit I've also tried replacing the lines from from django.utils import unittest with:

from django.core.management import call_command
call_command('syncdb', interactive=False)
book = Book.objects.create(isbn='9780470467244')

This gives the following feedback, before raising the same DatabaseError as above:

Creating tables ...
Installing custom SQL ...
Installing indexes ...
Installed 0 object(s) from 0 fixture(s)

Summary Thanks to help from Pavel this is working. For reference, here is a compact version of the script minus the extraneous unittest stuff:

# Django Minimal Working Example
#   usage: save as `mwe.py` and run `python mwe.py`

# Setup django with an in-memory sqlite3 database
#   Thanks to Pavel Anossov http://stackoverflow.com/a/15824108/188595
import sys
from django.conf import settings
from django.core.management import call_command
settings.configure(
        DATABASES = {
            'default': {'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.sqlite3',
                        'NAME': ':memory:'}
        },
        INSTALLED_APPS = ('mwe',),
    )
from django.db import models
sys.modules['mwe.models'] = sys.modules['mwe.mwe'] = sys.modules['mwe'] = sys.modules[__name__]
sys.modules[__name__].__name__ = __package__ = 'mwe.mwe'

# YOUR MODEL DEFINITIONS HERE

class Book(models.Model):
    isbn = models.IntegerField()

# The call_command line has to appear after all model definitions
call_command('syncdb', interactive=False)

# YOUR CODE HERE

Book.objects.create(isbn='9780470467244')
assert Book.objects.count() == 1
share|improve this question
    
do you have an mwe_book table in your database? This would be accomplished normally by syncdb command –  dm03514 Mar 27 '13 at 16:29
    
Have you created the database and tables? –  MattWritesCode Mar 27 '13 at 16:29
    
I'm hoping the unittest framework could be induced to do this. The point of this script is to make a single script that you can run to test (or demonstrate misbehaviour of) a bunch of models. –  Michael Dunn Mar 27 '13 at 16:32

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted
+50

What you were missing is actually installing an app:

settings.configure(
        DATABASES = {
            'default': {'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.sqlite3',
                        'NAME': ':memory:'}
        },
        INSTALLED_APPS = ('mwe',),
    )

This means this module will also be imported as mwe.models by syncdb and as mwe by translation:

sys.modules['mwe.models'] = sys.modules[__name__]
sys.modules['mwe'] = sys.modules[__name__]

My final version:

from django.conf import settings
import sys

settings.configure(
        DATABASES = {
            'default': {'ENGINE': 'django.db.backends.sqlite3',
                        'NAME': ':memory:'}
        },
        INSTALLED_APPS = ('mwe',),
    )


from django.core.management import call_command
from django.utils import unittest
from django.db import models
from django.test import TestCase

sys.modules['mwe.models'] = sys.modules[__name__]
sys.modules['mwe.mwe'] = sys.modules[__name__]
sys.modules['mwe'] = sys.modules[__name__]
sys.modules[__name__].__name__ = 'mwe.mwe'
__package__ = 'mwe.mwe'


class Book(models.Model):
    isbn = models.IntegerField()


class TestCreateObjects(TestCase):
    def setUp(self):
        book = Book.objects.create(isbn='9780470467244')

    def test_sanity(self):
        self.assertEqual(Book.objects.count(), 1)

call_command('syncdb', interactive=False)
unittest.main()

$ python mwe.py
Creating tables ...
Creating table mwe_book
Installing custom SQL ...
Installing indexes ...
Installed 0 object(s) from 0 fixture(s)
.
----------------------------------------------------------------------
Ran 1 test in 0.002s

OK

I'm sure this is broken in some horrible ways and is dependent on django version, but we'll have to try and see.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this is brilliant! I'm not sure on reflection that the added complexity of including unittest is advisable, but it works fine without too. I don't really understand what all the sys.modules stuff is doing, and it looks pretty inelegant, but it seems to get the job done. Thanks again! –  Michael Dunn Apr 9 '13 at 15:01

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