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I'm attempting to keep my code to 80 chars or less nowadays as I think it looks more aesthetically pleasing, for the most part. Sometimes, though, the code ends up looking worse if I have to put line breaks in weird places.

One thing I haven't figured out how to handle very nicely yet is long strings. For example:

#0.........1........2........3........4.........5.........6.........7.........8xxxxxxxxx9xxxxxx
def foo():
    if conditional():
        logger.info("<Conditional's meaning> happened, so we're not setting up the interface.")
        return

    #.....

It's over! Putting it on the next line won't help either:

#0.........1........2........3........4.........5.........6.........7.........8xxxxxxxxx9xxxxxx
def foo():
    if conditional():
        logger.info(
            "<Conditional's meaning> happened, so we're not setting up the interface.")
        return

    #.....

I could use line breaks but that looks awful:

#0.........1........2........3........4.........5.........6.........7.........8
def foo():
    if conditional():
        logger.info(
            "<Conditional's meaning> happened, so we're not setting \
up the interface.")
        return

    #.....

What to do? Shortening the string is one option but I don't want the readability of my messages to be affected by something as arbitrary as how many indentation levels the code happened to have at that point.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 34 down vote accepted

You can split the string into two:

def foo():
    if conditional():
        logger.info("<Conditional's meaning> happened, so we're not "
                    "setting up the interface.")

Multiple consecutive strings within the same expression are automatically concatenated into one, at compile time:

>>> def foo():
...     if conditional():
...         logger.info("<Conditional's meaning> happened, so we're not "
...                     "setting up the interface.")
... 
>>> import dis
>>> dis.dis(foo)
  2           0 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (conditional)
              3 CALL_FUNCTION            0
              6 POP_JUMP_IF_FALSE       25

  3           9 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (logger)
             12 LOAD_ATTR                2 (info)
             15 LOAD_CONST               1 ("<Conditional's meaning> happened, so we're not setting up the interface.")
             18 CALL_FUNCTION            1
             21 POP_TOP             
             22 JUMP_FORWARD             0 (to 25)
        >>   25 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             28 RETURN_VALUE        

Note the LOAD_CONST for line 3, the bytecode for the function contains one string, already concatenated.

If you were to add a + to the expression, two separate constants are created:

>>> def foo():
...     if conditional():
...         logger.info("<Conditional's meaning> happened, so we're not " + 
...                     "setting up the interface.")
... 
>>> dis.dis(foo)
  2           0 LOAD_GLOBAL              0 (conditional)
              3 CALL_FUNCTION            0
              6 POP_JUMP_IF_FALSE       29

  3           9 LOAD_GLOBAL              1 (logger)
             12 LOAD_ATTR                2 (info)
             15 LOAD_CONST               1 ("<Conditional's meaning> happened, so we're not ")

  4          18 LOAD_CONST               2 ('setting up the interface.')
             21 BINARY_ADD          
             22 CALL_FUNCTION            1
             25 POP_TOP             
             26 JUMP_FORWARD             0 (to 29)
        >>   29 LOAD_CONST               0 (None)
             32 RETURN_VALUE        

Python does fold binary operations on constants at compile time (so +, *, - etc.), in the peephole optimizations for the byte compiler. So for certain string concatenations the compiler may also replace + string concatenation of constants with the concatenated result. See peephole.c, for sequences (including strings) this optimization is only applied if the result is limited to 20 items (characters) or fewer.

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3  
@nightcracker: The compiler merges the strings. With + you move the concatenation to run-time. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 27 '13 at 16:32
1  
@nightcracker: Evidence added. Sorry, but you are wrong. With + there are two string constants, and they are added at run time. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 27 '13 at 16:34
1  
@MartijnPieters counter-evidence: gist.github.com/nightcracker/5255760 They're equally fast. –  nightcracker Mar 27 '13 at 16:34
1  
@nightcracker: It seems that for some strings the compiler optimizes the string concatenation. For this case, the compile-time concatenation does not happen. I added a counter-counter example to your gist. –  Martijn Pieters Mar 27 '13 at 16:37
1  
@MartijnPieters ah ok. Either way, the performance argument is irrelevant either way IMO - unless we're talking about a performance bottleneck here. But I strongly doubt that this logger entry is a performance bottleneck. –  nightcracker Mar 27 '13 at 16:40

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