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I'm looking for a way to reduce some print clutter in some of my scripts. I want some output to go to a file, some to the screen, and some to both. It's the "some to both" that is eluding me. Is there a way to open a FILEHANDLE that will go to both STDOUT and a file that is already opened?

Something like this:

open ($file_only, ">", "$logfile");
open ($file_and_term, .....);


print $file_and_term "Nice stuff for the user to see\n";
print $file "$some_command\n";
print $file `$some_command`;   
$debug && print $file "some debug info goes here, too\n";
print "Hey, good job! You're done!\n"

My goal is that the lines that get sent to $file_and_term will not be double lines, one going to $file and one going to STDOUT. And also to make it more dynamic, based on debug levels, perhaps using a select statement controlled by the debug level.


So, while writing the above, I did come up with a solution that fits my needs but not my desires. :) So I'll post this Question while I implement my differently elegant solution.


I ended up doing this.... it's no where near as nice as a regular print, but I could make it more robust later....

sub printit {
    my ($opt, $text) = @_;
    if ($opt == $FILE || $opt == $BOTH) {print $LOG $text}
    if ($opt == $TERM || $opt == $BOTH) {print $text}
}      
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I have Perl 5.8.8. I don not have IO::Tee, File::Tee, or PerlIO:Util. Also, my script needs to work on both Unix and Windows platforms. –  Stacey Robert Greenstein Apr 2 '13 at 22:38

1 Answer 1

As suggested by an answer to an earlier question, you can use IO::Tee and say

my ($file, $file_and_term);
open $file, '>', $logfile;
$file_and_term = IO::Tee->new( $file, \*STDOUT );
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1  
There is actually an even earlier answer that uses IO::Tee. –  Brad Gilbert Mar 28 '13 at 15:45
    
I have Perl 5.8.8. I don not have IO::Tee, File::Tee, or PerlIO:Util. Also, my script needs to work on both Unix and Windows platforms. –  Stacey Robert Greenstein Apr 4 '13 at 14:47
    
@Stacey Robert Greenstein - then install them. They run on practically every version and platform of Perl. –  mob Apr 4 '13 at 15:25
    
We don't have that option. We're on a closed system. We don't get to decide what gets installed. If it's there, we can use it. If it's not, then either we can't, or there's enough red tape to make getting it not worth it. –  Stacey Robert Greenstein Apr 5 '13 at 17:06
1  
Surely you can copy the source code as easily as you can copy an answer from StackOverflow. –  mob Apr 5 '13 at 17:27

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