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I have a large WPF application that uses the MVVM design pattern and asynchronous data access methods. It uses the old style asynchronous code with callback handlers and the IAsyncResult interface... here is a typical example:

function.BeginInvoke(callBackMethod, asyncState);

Then , in the view model, I have the following callback handler:

private void GotData(GetDataOperationResult<Genres> result)
{
    UiThreadManager.RunOnUiThread((Action)delegate
    {
        if (result.IsSuccess) DoSomething(result.ReturnValue);
        else FeedbackManager.Add(result);
    });
}

The RunOnUiThread method is basically the following:

public object RunOnUiThread(Delegate method)
{
    return Dispatcher.Invoke(DispatcherPriority.Normal, method);
}

This problem only affects one view model, the one that enables the users to edit the Release objects. On the related view, certain collections that populate ComboBoxes are requested from the database when it is first loaded. Let's simplify this saying that there is just one collection called Genres. After the data arrives in the view model, it is handled like so:

private void GotGenres(GetDataOperationResult<Genres> result)
{
    UiThreadManager.RunOnUiThread((Action)delegate
    {
        if (result.IsSuccess) Genres.AddEmptyItemBefore(result.ReturnValue);
        else FeedbackManager.Add(result);
    });
}

When the collection is present and a Release object has been selected in the UI, I have the following code selects the current Release.Genre value from the collection:

if (!Release.Genre.IsEmpty && Genres.ContainsItemWithId(Release.Genre.Id)) 
    Release.Genre = Genres.GetItemWithId(Release.Genre);

At this point, I should note that this all works fine and that this is the only line that references the Release.Genre property from the view model.

My particular problem is that sometimes the Release.Genre property is set to null and I can't work out how or from where. >> Edit >> When I put a break point on the property setter, << Edit << the Call Stack provides no real clues as to what is setting the null value, as there is only a [Native to Managed Transition] line. On selecting the Show External Code option from the Call Stack window, I can see basic asynchronous code calls:

Call Stack

Now I can confirm the following facts that I have discovered while attempting to fix this problem:

  1. The one line that references the Release.Genre property is not setting it to null.
  2. The call to Genres.AddEmptyItemBefore(result.ReturnValue) is not setting it to null... this just adds the result collection into the Genres collection after adding an 'empty' Genre.
  3. The Release.Genre property is sometimes set to null in or after the call to Genres.AddEmptyItemBefore(result.ReturnValue), but not because of it... when stepping through it on a few occasions, execution has jumped (in an unrelated manner) to the break point I set on the Release.Genre property setter where the value input parameter is null, but this does not happen each time.
  4. It generally happens when coming from a related view model to the Release view model, but not every time.
  5. The related view model has no references to the Release.Genre property.

To be clear, I am not asking anyone to debug my problem from the sparse information that I have provided. Neither am I asking for advice on making asynchronous data calls. Instead, I am really trying to find out new ways of proceeding that I have not yet thought of. I understand that some code (almost certainly my code) somewhere is setting the property to null... my question is how can I detect where this code is? It does not appear to be in the Release view model. How can I continue to debug this problem with no more clues?

share|improve this question
    
Maybe flat file logging or database logging can help you? Usually I use those 2 logging if cannot debug using VS, especially in WPF since binding less likely debugable. – Fendy Mar 27 '13 at 16:54
    
I don't think that is caused by any code. You must have a binding to that property somewhere, which should be changed to OneWay. – HighCore Mar 27 '13 at 16:59
    
@Fendy, could you please explain your idea further? @HighCore, I thought you were onto something then because my the Binding to the Genres collection on the ComboBox did not have OneWay=True. Unfortunately, after I added it, I still have exactly the same problem. – Sheridan Mar 27 '13 at 17:15
    
@Sheridan See my answer below – Fendy Mar 27 '13 at 17:34
    
Instead of trying to step through the code, could you put a conditional break point on the Release.Genre setter for when value == null? And then check the call stack or step through from there to find the culprit? – Metro Smurf Mar 27 '13 at 21:17

I usually use Flat File, XML or Database logging for debugging purpose. I created those Log classes for logging purpose, so that I can call it from every applications I develop.

For database logging, you can do it as simple as:

void WriteLog(string log){
  // Your database insert here
}

Maybe you need datetime and other supporting information, but it's up to the developer. For simple flat file logging is:

void WriteLog(string log){
  using(TextWriter tx = new StreamWriter("./Log/" + DateTime.Now.ToString() + ".txt", false)){
    tx.WriteLine(log);
  }
}

You can use the logging in your application in both ways:

1: Method call

WriteLog((Release.Genre == null).ToString());
if (!Release.Genre.IsEmpty && Genres.ContainsItemWithId(Release.Genre.Id)) 
    Release.Genre = Genres.GetItemWithId(Release.Genre);

2: Add it in your Release.Genre set (or get) property

public class Release{
  private Genre _genre=null;
  public Genre Genre{
    get{
      WriteLog((_genre == null).ToString());
      return _genre;
    }
    set{
      WriteLog((_genre == null).ToString());
      _genre = value;      
    }
  }
}

With this, you can try to get the call sequence, whether the Release.Genre is being set in other places before, during call, etc.

Please note I just giving the general image of building logging. Please expect errors. However, it is developer's responsibility to develop the Logging acitivities to meet requirement.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for expanding your idea @Fendy. While interesting, I'm not sure how this can help me in this situation. As far as I can tell, this method won't help me to discover what is setting the property to null. In fact correct me if I'm wrong, but it doesn't seem as if it could help any more than putting a break point on the setter. – Sheridan Mar 28 '13 at 9:04
    
@Sheridan It is not as easy as breakpoint but this way can do the work. You can log the DateTime and additional information such as method name or variables, in replacement for breakpoint. Do the log at where you will likely put the breakpoint. – Fendy Mar 28 '13 at 15:19

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