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I've written a routine in C++ that solves the system of equations Ax = b using Gauss-Seidel method. However, I want to use this code for specific "A" matrices that are sparse (most of the elements are zero). This way, most of the time that this solver takes is busy multiplying some elements by zero.

For example, for the following system of equations:

| 4 -1  0  0  0 | | x1 |   | b1 |
|-1  4 -1  0  0 | | x2 |   | b2 |
| 0 -1  4 -1  0 | | x3 | = | b3 |
| 0  0 -1  4 -1 | | x4 |   | b4 |
| 0  0  0 -1  4 | | x5 |   | b5 |

Using Gauss-Seidel method, we will have the following iteration formula for x1:

x1 = [b1 - (-1 * x2 + 0 * x3 + 0 * x4 + 0 * x5)] / 4

As you see, the solver is wasting time by multiplying zero elements. Since I work with big matrices (for example, 10^5 by 10^5), this will influence the total CPU time in a negative way. I wonder if there is a way to optimize the solver so that it omits those part of calculations related to zero element multiplications.

Note that the the form of the "A" matrix in the example above is arbitrary and the solver must be able to work with any "A" matrix.

Here is the code:

void GaussSeidel(double **A, double *b, double *x, int arraySize)
{   
const double tol = 0.001 * arraySize;
double error = tol + 1;

for (int i = 1; i <= arraySize; ++i)
    x[i] = 0;

double *xOld;
xOld = new double [arraySize];
for (int i = 1; i <= arraySize; ++i)
    xOld[i] = 101;

while (abs(error) > tol)
{

    for (int i = 1; i <= arraySize; ++i)
    {
        sum = 0;
        for (int j = 1; j <= arraySize; ++j)
        {
            if (j == i)
                continue;
            sum = sum + A[i][j] * x[j];
        }
        x[i] = 1 / A[i][i] * (b[i] - sum);
    }

    //cout << endl << "Answers:" << endl << endl;
    error = errorCalc(xOld, x, arraySize);

    for (int i = 1; i <= arraySize; ++i)
        xOld[i] = x[i];

cout << "Solution converged!" << endl << endl;
}
share|improve this question
1  
I don't think it's possible unless you change the data structure. Are you sure beforehand that the matrix will be tridiagonal and not just "sparse"? – lezebulon Mar 27 '13 at 17:31
    
The matrix is just sparse and not necessarily tridiagonal. – Amin Sadeghi Mar 28 '13 at 2:22
up vote 2 down vote accepted

How sparse do you mean?

Here's a crappy sparse implementation that should work well for solving systems of linear equasions. It's probably a naive implementation, I know very little about the data structures typically used in industrial strength sparse matrices.

The code, and an example, is here.

Here's the class that does most of the work:

template <typename T>
class SparseMatrix
{
private:
    SparseMatrix();

public:
    SparseMatrix(int row, int col);

    T Get(int row, int col) const;
    void Put(int row, int col, T value);

    int GetRowCount() const;
    int GetColCount() const;

    static void GaussSeidelLinearSolve(const SparseMatrix<T>& A, const SparseMatrix<T>& B, SparseMatrix<T>& X);

private:
    int dim_row;
    int dim_col;

    vector<map<int, T> > values_by_row;
    vector<map<int, T> > values_by_col;
};

The other method definitions are included in the ideone. I don't test for convergence, but rather simply loop an arbitrary number of times.

The sparse representation stores, by row and column, the positions of all of the values, using STL maps. I'm able to solve a system of 10000 equasions in just 1/4 seconds for a very sparse matrix like the one you provided (density < .001).

My implementation should be generic enough to support any integral or user defined type that supports comparison, the 4 arithmetic operators (+, -, *, /), and that can be explicitly cast from 0 (empty nodes are given the value (T) 0).

share|improve this answer
    
In addition, I suspect that there are additional restrictions on the behavior of the templated type (specifically, some behaviors may cause the system to fail to converge). In general, any type whose domain is isomorphic to the real numbers should work. – Wug Mar 27 '13 at 19:04
    
Thanks a lot, that helped :) – Amin Sadeghi Mar 28 '13 at 3:44
    
I didn't think to mention this before, but you should be careful - this implementation will perform very poorly for non-sparse matrices. – Wug Apr 5 '13 at 5:02

Writing a sparse linear system solver is hard. VERY HARD.

I would just pick one of the exisiting implementations. Any reasonable LP solver has a sparse linear system solver inside, see for example lp_solve, GLPK, etc.

If the licence is acceptable for you, I recommend the Harwell Subroutine library. Interfacing C++ and Fortran is not fun though...

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Recently, I face the same problem. My solution is using vector array to save the sparse matrix. Here is my code:

#define PRECISION   0.01

inline bool checkPricision(float x[], float pre[], int n) {
    for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        if (fabs(x[i] - pre[i]) > PRECISION) return false;
    }
    return true;
}

/* mx = b */
void gaussIteration(std::vector< std::pair<int, float> >* m, float x[], float b[], int n) {
    float* pre = new float[n];
    int cnt = 0;
    while (true) {
        cnt++;
        memcpy(pre, x, sizeof(float)* n);
        for (int i = 0; i < n; i++) {
            x[i] = b[i];
            float mii = -1;
            for (int j = 0; j < m[i].size(); j++) {
                if (m[i][j].first != i) {
                    x[i] -= m[i][j].second * x[m[i][j].first];
                }
                else {
                    mii = m[i][j].second;
                }
            }
            if (mii == -1) {
                puts("Error: No Solution");
                return;
            }
            x[i] /= mii;
        }
        if (checkPricision(x, pre, n)) {
            break;
        }
    }
    delete[] pre;
}
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Try PETSC. You need CRS (Compressed row storage) format for this.

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