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A project I'm working on requires the use of jQuery on customers' Web pages. Customers will insert a chunk of code that we'll supply which includes a few <script> elements that build a widget in a <script>-created <iframe>. If they aren't already using the latest version of jQuery, this will also include (most likely) a <script> for Google's hosted version of jQuery.

The problem is that some customers may already have an older version of jQuery installed. While this may work if it's at least a fairly recent version, our code does rely on some recently introduced functionality in the jQuery library, so there are bound to be instances when a customer's jQuery version is just too old. We can't require that they upgrade to the latest version of jQuery.

Is there any way to load a newer version of jQuery to use only within the context of our code, that will not interfere with, or affect, any code on the customer's page? Ideally, maybe we could check for the presence of jQuery, detect the version, and if it's too old, then somehow load the most recent version just to use for our code.

I had the idea of loading jQuery in an <iframe> in the customer's domain that also includes our <script>, which seems like it might be feasible, but I'm hoping there's a more elegant way to do it (not to mention without the performance and complexity penalties of extra <iframe>s).

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6 Answers 6

up vote 252 down vote accepted

Yes, it's doable due to jQuery's noconflict mode. http://blog.nemikor.com/2009/10/03/using-multiple-versions-of-jquery/

<!-- load jQuery 1.1.3 -->
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://example.com/jquery-1.1.3.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
var jQuery_1_1_3 = $.noConflict(true);
</script>

<!-- load jQuery 1.3.2 -->
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://example.com/jquery-1.3.2.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
var jQuery_1_3_2 = $.noConflict(true);
</script>

Then, instead of $('#selector').function();, you'd do jQuery_1_3_2('#selector').function(); or jQuery_1_1_3('#selector').function();.

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5  
Thanks very much, ceejayoz! That looks like a viable solution - the only potential problem is that I don't have any control over the first part of your code solution (assigning the older version of jQuery to a different alias). How the customer is using jQuery will vary and is outside of my control. Can I safely just use the latter half, or do both libraries need to call noConflict()? –  Bungle Oct 14 '09 at 15:05
5  
Yes, you should be able to just use the second half. –  ceejayoz Oct 14 '09 at 16:24
6  
Is this really transparent to the original page? If they use $ or jQuery after this piece of code, would this refer to their own jQuery version or the newer one (which possibly has fewer plugins installed)? –  Wim Jan 17 '11 at 23:18
    
One important caveat to this answer is that you need to make sure you older version plugins are loaded before the new jQuery and thats still assuming the plugins are written correctly (passing jQuery object as an argument for $) –  Adam Gent Jun 3 '11 at 20:19
14  
@blachawk No, just alias it. (function($) { /*your code here*/ }(jquery_x_x_x)); –  Fabrício Matté May 9 '13 at 22:58

After looking at this and trying it out I found it actually didn't allow more than one instance of jquery to run at a time. After searching around I found that this did just the trick and was a whole lot less code.

    <script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.2/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    <script src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.9.1/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
    <script>var $j = jQuery.noConflict(true);</script>
    <script>
      $(document).ready(function(){
       console.log($().jquery); // This prints v1.4.2
       console.log($j().jquery); // This prints v1.9.1
      });
   </script>

So then adding the "j" after the "$" was all I needed to do.

$j(function () {
        $j('.button-pro').on('click', function () {
            var el = $('#cnt' + this.id.replace('btn', ''));
            $j('#contentnew > div').not(el).animate({
                height: "toggle",
                opacity: "toggle"
            }, 100).hide();
            el.toggle();
        });
    });
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  • Original page loads his "jquery.versionX.js" -- $ and jQuery belong to versionX.
  • You call your "jquery.versionY.js" -- now $ and jQuery belong to versionY, plus _$ and _jQuery belong to versionX.
  • my_jQuery = jQuery.noConflict(true); -- now $ and jQuery belong to versionX, _$ and _jQuery are probably null, and my_jQuery is versionY.

http://forum.jquery.com/topic/multiple-versions-of-jquery-on-the-same-page

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6  
I didn't understand until i went to the link. "When you load your jQuery.x.x.js, it will overwrite the existing $ and jQuery vars... BUT it keeps a backup copy of them (in _$ and _jQuery). Calling noConflict(true) you restore the situation as it was before your js inclusion" –  Colin Feb 21 '12 at 12:14
2  

It is possible to load second version of the jQuery use it and then restore to the original or keep second version if there was no jQuery loaded before. Here is an example:

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.8.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.6.4/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script type="text/javascript">
    var jQueryTemp = jQuery.noConflict(true);
    var jQueryOriginal = jQuery || jQueryTemp;
    if (window.jQuery){
        console.log('Original jQuery: ', jQuery.fn.jquery);
        console.log('Second jQuery: ', jQueryTemp.fn.jquery);
    }
    window.jQuery = window.$ = jQueryTemp;
</script>
<script type="text/javascript">
    console.log('Script using second: ', jQuery.fn.jquery);
</script>
<script type="text/javascript">
    // Restore original jQuery:
    window.jQuery = window.$ = jQueryOriginal;
    console.log('Script using original or the only version: ', jQuery.fn.jquery);
</script>
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You can have as many different jQuery versions on your page as you want.

Use jQuery.noConflict():

<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.8.3/jquery.min.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
<script>
    var $i = jQuery.noConflict();
    alert($i.fn.jquery);
</script> 

<script src="https://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.9.1/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script>
    var $j = jQuery.noConflict();
    alert($j.fn.jquery);
</script> 

<script type="text/javascript" src="http://ajax.googleapis.com/ajax/libs/jquery/1.4.2/jquery.min.js"></script>
<script>
    var $k = jQuery.noConflict();
    alert($k.fn.jquery);
</script> 

DEMO | Source

share|improve this answer
  • original page loads his "jquery.versionX.js"
  • $ and jQuery belong to versionX
  • you call your "jquery.versionY.js"
  • now $ and jQuery belong to versionY, plus _$ and _jQuery that belongs to versionX
  • var my_jQuery = jQuery.noConflict(true);
  • now $ and jQuery belong to versionX, _$ and _jQuery are probably null, and my_jQuery is versionY
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protected by ThiefMaster Apr 27 '11 at 11:33

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