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I'm sure this has bothered you - it has bothered me for some time now. What are the differences between AngularJS module's Service, Provider and Factory?

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27  
I found that all the Angular terms were intimidating for beginners. We started off with this cheatsheet that was a little easier for our programmers to understand while learning Angular demisx.github.io/angularjs/2014/09/14/…. Hope this helps your team too. –  demisx Sep 16 at 17:07

13 Answers 13

up vote 1159 down vote accepted

From the Angular mailing list I got an amazing thread that explains service vs factory vs provider and their injection usage. Compiling the answers:

Services

Syntax: module.service( 'serviceName', function );
Result: When declaring serviceName as an injectable argument you will be provided with an instance of the function. In other words new FunctionYouPassedToService().

Factories

Syntax: module.factory( 'factoryName', function );
Result: When declaring factoryName as an injectable argument you will be provided with the value that is returned by invoking the function reference passed to module.factory.

Providers

Syntax: module.provider( 'providerName', function );
Result: When declaring providerName as an injectable argument you will be provided with ProviderFunction().$get(). The constructor function is instantiated before the $get method is called - ProviderFunction is the function reference passed to module.provider.

Providers have the advantage that they can be configured during the module configuration phase.

See here for the provided code: http://jsbin.com/ohamub/1/edit

Here's a great further explanation by Misko:

provide.value('a', 123);

function Controller(a) {
  expect(a).toEqual(123);
}

In this case the injector simply returns the value as is. But what if you want to compute the value? Then use a factory

provide.factory('b', function(a) {
  return a*2;
});

function Controller(b) {
  expect(b).toEqual(246);
}

So factory is a function which is responsible for creating the value. Notice that the factory function can ask for other dependencies.

But what if you want to be more OO and have a class called Greeter?

function Greeter(a) {
  this.greet = function() {
    return 'Hello ' + a;
  }
}

Then to instantiate you would have to write

provide.factory('greeter', function(a) {
  return new Greeter(a);
});

Then we could ask for 'greeter' in controller like this

function Controller(greeter) {
  expect(greeter instanceof Greeter).toBe(true);
  expect(greeter.greet()).toEqual('Hello 123');
}    

But that is way too wordy. A shorter way to write this would be provider.service('greeter', Greeter);

But what if we wanted to configure the Greeter class before the injection? Then we could write

provide.provider('greeter2', function() {
  var salutation = 'Hello';
  this.setSalutation = function(s) {
    salutation = s;
  }

  function Greeter(a) {
    this.greet = function() {
      return salutation + ' ' + a;
    }
  }

  this.$get = function(a) {
    return new Greeter(a);
  };
});

We can then do this:

angular.module('abc', []).config(function(greeter2Provider) {
  greeter2Provider.setSalutation('Halo');
});

function Controller(greeter2) {
  expect(greeter2.greet()).toEqual('Halo 123');
}

As a side note, service, factory, and value are all derived from provider.

provider.service = function(name, Class) {
  provider.provide(name, function() {
    this.$get = function($injector) {
      return $injector.instantiate(Class);
    };
  });
}

provider.factory = function(name, factory) {
  provider.provide(name, function() {
    this.$get = function($injector) {
      return $injector.invoke(factory);
    };
  });
}

provider.value = function(name, value) {
  provider.factory(name, function() {
    return value;
  });
};
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18  
See also stackoverflow.com/a/13763886/215945 which discusses the differences between service and factory. –  Mark Rajcok Mar 27 '13 at 18:10
4  
Would be helpful if you reformat your codeblock so we dont have all the scrollbars –  dynamo Mar 31 '13 at 17:50
6  
In the factory example I think there's an error: expect(a).toEqual(246); I guess that should be b? –  WickyNilliams Jun 5 '13 at 9:44
4  
I think there is another mistake in the provider example. greeter.greet() returns 'Halo'. '123' is a parameter. –  roland Aug 14 '13 at 12:16
5  
Although a service is called by creating an instance of the function. It is actually created only once per injector which makes it like singleton.docs.angularjs.org/guide/dev_guide.services.creating_services –  angelokh Dec 15 '13 at 6:17

live example

" hello world " example

with factory / service / provider :

var myApp = angular.module('myApp', []);

//service style, probably the simplest one
myApp.service('helloWorldFromService', function() {
    this.sayHello = function() {
        return "Hello, World!"
    };
});

//factory style, more involved but more sophisticated
myApp.factory('helloWorldFromFactory', function() {
    return {
        sayHello: function() {
            return "Hello, World!"
        }
    };
});

//provider style, full blown, configurable version     
myApp.provider('helloWorld', function() {
    // In the provider function, you cannot inject any
    // service or factory. This can only be done at the
    // "$get" method.

    this.name = 'Default';

    this.$get = function() {
        var name = this.name;
        return {
            sayHello: function() {
                return "Hello, " + name + "!"
            }
        }
    };

    this.setName = function(name) {
        this.name = name;
    };
});

//hey, we can configure a provider!            
myApp.config(function(helloWorldProvider){
    helloWorldProvider.setName('World');
});


function MyCtrl($scope, helloWorld, helloWorldFromFactory, helloWorldFromService) {

    $scope.hellos = [
        helloWorld.sayHello(),
        helloWorldFromFactory.sayHello(),
        helloWorldFromService.sayHello()];
}​
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6  
See it live here: jsfiddle.net/pkozlowski_opensource/PxdSP/14 –  smets.kevin Aug 30 '13 at 8:00
1  
Doesn't this change context in the $get function? - you no longer refer to the instantiated provider in that function. –  Nate Oct 23 '13 at 19:17
1  
@Nate: this doesn't change context, actually, because what's being called is new Provider().$get(), where Provider is the function being passed to app.provider. That is to say that $get() is being called as a method on the constructed Provider, so this will refer to Provider as the example suggests. –  Brandon Oct 28 '13 at 15:50
    
@Brandon Ohh ok that's kindof neat then. Confusing at first glance - thanks for the clarification! –  Nate Oct 28 '13 at 16:03
    
Can you please explain $get use in provider ? –  Arham Ali Qureshi Nov 2 '13 at 21:24

All Services are singletons, they get instantiated once per app. They can be of any type, whether it be a primitive, object literal, function, or even an instance of a custom type.

The value, factory, service, constant, and provider methods are all providers. They teach the Injector how to instantiate the Services.

The most verbose, but also the most comprehensive one is a Provider recipe. The remaining four recipe types — Value, Factory, Service and Constant — are just syntactic sugar on top of a provider recipe.

  • the Value Recipe is the simplest case, where you instantiate the Service yourself and provide the instantiated value to the injector.
  • The Factory recipe gives the Injector a factory function that it calls when it needs to instantiate the service. When called, the factory function creates and returns the service instance. The dependencies of the Service are injected as the functions's arguments. So using this recipe adds the following abilities:
    • ability to use other services (have dependencies)
    • service initialization
    • delayed/lazy initialization
  • The Service recipe is almost the same as the Factory recipe, but here the Injector invokes a constructor with the new operator instead of a factory function.
  • The Provider recipe is usually overkill. It adds one more layer of indirection by allowing you to configure the creation of the factory.

    You should use the Provider recipe only when you want to expose an API for application-wide configuration that must be made before the application starts. This is usually interesting only for reusable services whose behavior might need to vary slightly between applications.

  • The Constant recipe is just like the Value recipe except it allows you to define services that are available in the config phase. Sooner than services created using the Value recipe. Unlike Values, they cannot be decorated using decorator.
See the provider docs.

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24  
By far the most succinct and useful answer here on the how and why these providers exist. Thank you! –  joshperry Jan 7 at 21:54
7  
The syntactic sugar explanation clears up so much... –  user2483724 Mar 16 at 1:57
1  
This might be the best explanation. Sometimes examples are just distracting when you want the real meaning! –  R Claven May 28 at 3:41
5  
Your description is far more clear than those 2 more upvoted answers, Thanks! –  Jani Jun 24 at 4:57

TL;DR

1) When you’re using a Factory you create an object, add properties to it, then return that same object. When you pass this factory into your controller, those properties on the object will now be available in that controller through your factory.

app.controller(‘myFactoryCtrl’, function($scope, myFactory){
  $scope.artist = myFactory.getArtist();
});

app.factory(‘myFactory’, function(){
  var _artist = ‘Shakira’;
  var service = {};

  service.getArtist = function(){
    return _artist;
  }

  return service;
});


2) When you’re using Service, Angular instantiates it behind the scenes with the ‘new’ keyword. Because of that, you’ll add properties to ‘this’ and the service will return ‘this’. When you pass the service into your controller, those properties on ‘this’ will now be available on that controller through your service.

app.controller(‘myServiceCtrl’, function($scope, myService){
  $scope.artist = myService.getArtist();
});

app.service(‘myService’, function(){
  var _artist = ‘Nelly’;
  this.getArtist = function(){
    return _artist;
  }
});



2) Providers are the only service you can pass into your .config() function. Use a provider when you want to provide module-wide configuration for your service object before making it available.

app.controller(‘myProvider’, function($scope, myProvider){
  $scope.artist = myProvider.getArtist();
  $scope.data.thingFromConfig = myProvider.thingOnConfig;
});

app.provider(‘myProvider’, function(){
 //Only the next two lines are available in the app.config()
 this._artist = ‘’;
 this.thingFromConfig = ‘’;
  this.$get = function(){
    var that = this;
    return {
      getArtist: function(){
        return that._artist;
      },
      thingOnConfig: that.thingFromConfig
    }
  }
});

app.config(function(myProviderProvider){
  myProviderProvider.thingFromConfig = ‘This was set in config’;
});



Non TL;DR

1) Factory
Factories are the most popular way to create and configure a service. There’s really not much more than what the TL;DR said. You just create an object, add properties to it, then return that same object. Then when you pass the factory into your controller, those properties on the object will now be available in that controller through your factory. A more extensive example is below.

app.factory(‘myFactory’, function(){
  var service = {};
  return service;
});

Now whatever properties we attach to ‘service’ will be available to us when we pass ‘myFactory’ into our controller.

Now let’s add some ‘private’ variables to our callback function. These won’t be directly accessible from the controller, but we will eventually set up some getter/setter methods on ‘service’ to be able to alter these ‘private’ variables when needed.

app.factory(‘myFactory’, function($http, $q){
  var service = {};
  var baseUrl = ‘https://itunes.apple.com/search?term=’;
  var _artist = ‘’;
  var _finalUrl = ‘’;

  var makeUrl = function(){
   _artist = _artist.split(‘ ‘).join(‘+’);
    _finalUrl = baseUrl + _artist + ‘&callback=JSON_CALLBACK’;
    return _finalUrl
  }

  return service;
});

Here you’ll notice we’re not attaching those variables/function to ‘service’. We’re simply creating them in order to either use or modify them later.

  • baseUrl is the base URL that the iTunes API requires
  • _artist is the artist we wish to lookup
  • _finalUrl is the final and fully built URL to which we’ll make the call to iTunes makeUrl is a function that will create and return our iTunes friendly URL.

Now that our helper/private variables and function are in place, let’s add some properties to the ‘service’ object. Whatever we put on ‘service’ we’ll be able to directly use in whichever controller we pass ‘myFactory’ into.

We are going to create setArtist and getArtist methods that simply return or set the artist. We are also going to create a method that will call the iTunes API with our created URL. This method is going to return a promise that will fulfill once the data has come back from the iTunes API. If you haven’t had much experience using promises in Angular, I highly recommend doing a deep dive on them.

Below setArtist accepts an artist and allows you to set the artist. getArtist returns the artist callItunes first calls makeUrl() in order to build the URL we’ll use with our $http request. Then it sets up a promise object, makes an $http request with our final url, then because $http returns a promise, we are able to call .success or .error after our request. We then resolve our promise with the iTunes data, or we reject it with a message saying ‘There was an error’.

app.factory('myFactory', function($http, $q){
  var service = {};
  var baseUrl = 'https://itunes.apple.com/search?term=';
  var _artist = '';
  var _finalUrl = '';

  var makeUrl = function(){
    _artist = _artist.split(' ').join('+');
    _finalUrl = baseUrl + _artist + '&callback=JSON_CALLBACK'
    return _finalUrl;
  }

  service.setArtist = function(artist){
    _artist = artist;
  }

  service.getArtist = function(){
    return _artist;
  }

  service.callItunes = function(){
    makeUrl();
    var deferred = $q.defer();
    $http({
      method: 'JSONP',
      url: _finalUrl
    }).success(function(data){
      deferred.resolve(data);
    }).error(function(){
      deferred.reject('There was an error')
    })
    return deferred.promise;
  }

  return service;
});

Now our factory is complete. We are now able to inject ‘myFactory’ into any controller and we’ll then be able to call our methods that we attached to our service object (setArtist, getArtist, and callItunes).

app.controller('myFactoryCtrl', function($scope, myFactory){
  $scope.data = {};
  $scope.updateArtist = function(){
    myFactory.setArtist($scope.data.artist);
  };

  $scope.submitArtist = function(){
    myFactory.callItunes()
      .then(function(data){
        $scope.data.artistData = data;
      }, function(data){
        alert(data);
      })
  }
});

In the controller above we’re injecting in the ‘myFactory’ service. We then set properties on our $scope object that are coming from data from ‘myFactory’. The only tricky code above is if you’ve never dealt with promises before. Because callItunes is returning a promise, we are able to use the .then() method and only set $scope.data.artistData once our promise is fulfilled with the iTunes data. You’ll notice our controller is very ‘thin’. All of our logic and persistent data is located in our service, not in our controller.

2) Service
Perhaps the biggest thing to know when dealing with creating a Service is that that it’s instantiated with the ‘new’ keyword. For you JavaScript gurus this should give you a big hint into the nature of the code. For those of you with a limited background in JavaScript or for those who aren’t too familiar with what the ‘new’ keyword actually does, let’s review some JavaScript fundamentals that will eventually help us in understanding the nature of a Service.

To really see the changes that occur when you invoke a function with the ‘new’ keyword, let’s create a function and invoke it with the ‘new’ keyword, then let’s show what the interpreter does when it sees the ‘new’ keyword. The end results will both be the same.

First let’s create our Constructor.

var Person = function(name, age){
  this.name = name;
  this.age = age;
}

This is a typical JavaScript constructor function. Now whenever we invoke the Person function using the ‘new’ keyword, ‘this’ will be bound to the newly created object.

Now let’s add a method onto our Person’s prototype so it will be available on every instance of our Person ‘class’.

Person.prototype.sayName = function(){
  alert(‘My name is ‘ + this.name);
}

Now, because we put the sayName function on the prototype, every instance of Person will be able to call the sayName function in order alert that instance’s name.

Now that we have our Person constructor function and our sayName function on its prototype, let’s actually create an instance of Person then call the sayName function.

var tyler = new Person(‘Tyler’, 23);
tyler.sayName(); //alerts ‘My name is Tyler’

So all together the code for creating a Person constructor, adding a function to it’s prototype, creating a Person instance, and then calling the function on its prototype looks like this.

var Person = function(name, age){
  this.name = name;
  this.age = age;
}
Person.prototype.sayName = function(){
  alert(‘My name is ‘ + this.name);
}
var tyler = new Person(‘Tyler’, 23);
tyler.sayName(); //alerts ‘My name is Tyler’

Now let’s look at what actually is happening when you use the ‘new’ keyword in JavaScript. First thing you should notice is that after using ‘new’ in our example, we’re able to call a method (sayName) on ‘tyler’ just as if it were an object - that’s because it is. So first, we know that our Person constructor is returning an object, whether we can see that in the code or not. Second, we know that because our sayName function is located on the prototype and not directly on the Person instance, the object that the Person function is returning must be delegating to its prototype on failed lookups. In more simple terms, when we call tyler.sayName() the interpreter says “OK, I’m going to look on the ‘tyler’ object we just created, locate the sayName function, then call it. Wait a minute, I don’t see it here - all I see is name and age, let me check the prototype. Yup, looks like it’s on the prototype, let me call it.”.

Below is code for how you can think about what the ‘new’ keyword is actually doing in JavaScript. It’s basically a code example of the above paragraph. I’ve put the ‘interpreter view’ or the way the interpreter sees the code inside of notes.

var Person = function(name, age){
  //The line below this creates an obj object that will delegate to the person’s prototype on failed lookups.
  //var obj = Object.create(Person.prototype);

  //The line directly below this sets ‘this’ to the newly created object
  //this = obj;

  this.name = name;
  this.age = age;

  //return this;
}

Now having this knowledge of what the ‘new’ keyword really does in JavaScript, creating a Service in Angular should be easier to understand.

The biggest thing to understand when creating a Service is knowing that Services are instantiated with the ‘new’ keyword. Combining that knowledge with our examples above, you should now recognize that you’ll be attaching your properties and methods directly to ‘this’ which will then be returned from the Service itself. Let’s take a look at this in action.

Unlike what we originally did with the Factory example, we don’t need to create an object then return that object because, like mentioned many times before, we used the ‘new’ keyword so the interpreter will create that object, have it delegate to it’s prototype, then return it for us without us having to do the work.

First things first, let’s create our ‘private’ and helper function. This should look very familiar since we did the exact same thing with our factory. I won’t explain what each line does here because I did that in the factory example, if you’re confused, re-read the factory example.

app.service('myService', function($http, $q){
  var baseUrl = 'https://itunes.apple.com/search?term=';
  var _artist = '';
  var _finalUrl = '';

  var makeUrl = function(){
    _artist = _artist.split(' ').join('+');
    _finalUrl = baseUrl + _artist + '&callback=JSON_CALLBACK'
    return _finalUrl;
  }
});

Now, we’ll attach all of our methods that will be available in our controller to ‘this’.

app.service('myService', function($http, $q){
  var baseUrl = 'https://itunes.apple.com/search?term=';
  var _artist = '';
  var _finalUrl = '';

  var makeUrl = function(){
    _artist = _artist.split(' ').join('+');
    _finalUrl = baseUrl + _artist + '&callback=JSON_CALLBACK'
    return _finalUrl;
  }

  this.setArtist = function(artist){
    _artist = artist;
  }

  this.getArtist = function(){
    return _artist;
  }

  this.callItunes = function(){
    makeUrl();
    var deferred = $q.defer();
    $http({
      method: 'JSONP',
      url: _finalUrl
    }).success(function(data){
      deferred.resolve(data);
    }).error(function(){
      deferred.reject('There was an error')
    })
    return deferred.promise;
  }

});

Now just like in our factory, setArtist, getArtist, and callItunes will be available in whichever controller we pass myService into. Here’s the myService controller (which is almost exactly the same as our factory controller).

app.controller('myServiceCtrl', function($scope, myService){
  $scope.data = {};
  $scope.updateArtist = function(){
    myService.setArtist($scope.data.artist);
  };

  $scope.submitArtist = function(){
    myService.callItunes()
      .then(function(data){
        $scope.data.artistData = data;
      }, function(data){
        alert(data);
      })
  }
});

Like I mentioned before, once you really understand what ‘new’ does, Services are almost identical to factories in Angular.

3) Provider

The biggest thing to remember about Providers is that they’re the only service that you can pass into the app.config portion of your application. This is of huge importance if you’re needing to alter some portion of your service object before it’s available everywhere else in your application. Although very similar to Services/Factories, there are a few differences which we’ll discuss.

First we set up our Provider in a similar way we did with our Service and Factory. The variables below are our ‘private’ and helper function.

app.provider('myProvider', function(){
   var baseUrl = 'https://itunes.apple.com/search?term=';
  var _artist = '';
  var _finalUrl = '';

  //Going to set this property on the config function below.
  this.thingFromConfig = ‘’;

  var makeUrl = function(){
    _artist = _artist.split(' ').join('+');
    _finalUrl = baseUrl + _artist + '&callback=JSON_CALLBACK'
    return _finalUrl;
  }
}

*Again if any portion of the above code is confusing, check out the Factory section where I explain what it all does it greater details.

You can think of Providers as having three sections. The first section is the ‘private’ variables/functions that will be modified/set later (shown above). The second section is the variables/functions that will be available in your app.config function and are therefore available to alter before they’re available anywhere else (also shown above). It’s important to note that those variables need to be attached to the ‘this’ keyword. In our example, only ‘thingFromConfig’ will be available to alter in the app.config. The third section (shown below) is all the variables/functions that will be available in your controller when you pass in the ‘myProvider’ service into that specific controller.

When creating a service with Provider, the only properties/methods that will be available in your controller are those properties/methods which are returned from the $get() function. The code below puts $get on ‘this’ (which we know will eventually be returned from that function). Now, that $get function returns all the methods/properties we want to be available in the controller. Here’s a code example.

this.$get = function($http, $q){
    return {
      callItunes: function(){
        makeUrl();
        var deferred = $q.defer();
        $http({
          method: 'JSONP',
          url: _finalUrl
        }).success(function(data){
          deferred.resolve(data);
        }).error(function(){
          deferred.reject('There was an error')
        })
        return deferred.promise;
      },
      setArtist: function(artist){
        _artist = artist;
      },
      getArtist: function(){
        return _artist;
      },
      thingOnConfig: this.thingFromConfig
    }
  }

Now the full Provider code looks like this

app.provider('myProvider', function(){
  var baseUrl = 'https://itunes.apple.com/search?term=';
  var _artist = '';
  var _finalUrl = '';

  //Going to set this property on the config function below
  this.thingFromConfig = '';

  var makeUrl = function(){
    _artist = _artist.split(' ').join('+');
    _finalUrl = baseUrl + _artist + '&callback=JSON_CALLBACK'
    return _finalUrl;
  }

  this.$get = function($http, $q){
    return {
      callItunes: function(){
        makeUrl();
        var deferred = $q.defer();
        $http({
          method: 'JSONP',
          url: _finalUrl
        }).success(function(data){
          deferred.resolve(data);
        }).error(function(){
          deferred.reject('There was an error')
        })
        return deferred.promise;
      },
      setArtist: function(artist){
        _artist = artist;
      },
      getArtist: function(){
        return _artist;
      },
      thingOnConfig: this.thingFromConfig
    }
  }
});

Now just like in our factory and Service, setArtist, getArtist, and callItunes will be available in whichever controller we pass myProvider into. Here’s the myProvider controller (which is almost exactly the same as our factory/Service controller).

app.controller('myProviderCtrl', function($scope, myProvider){
  $scope.data = {};
  $scope.updateArtist = function(){
    myProvider.setArtist($scope.data.artist);
  };

  $scope.submitArtist = function(){
    myProvider.callItunes()
      .then(function(data){
        $scope.data.artistData = data;
      }, function(data){
        alert(data);
      })
  }

  $scope.data.thingFromConfig = myProvider.thingOnConfig;
});

As mentioned before, the whole point of creating a service with Provider is to be able to alter some variables through the app.config function before the final object is passed to the rest of the application. Let’s see an example of that.

app.config(function(myProviderProvider){
  //Providers are the only service you can pass into app.config
  myProviderProvider.thingFromConfig = 'This sentence was set in app.config. Providers are the only service that can be passed into config. Check out the code to see how it works';
});

Now you can see how ‘thingFromConfig’ is as empty string in our provider, but when that shows up in the DOM, it will be ‘This sentence was set…’.

share|improve this answer
13  
This is the best answer ever. thank you so much. Know I get it. –  asumaran May 15 at 23:16
3  
I can't agree with @asumaran enough! I wish I could up vote this answer many, many times. A verbose answer, but extremely helpful and well written. The web is full of examples on how to create/use factories and services, but this is the first time that it was explained in a way that made it make sense! I actually can make a decision on what style to use in various places in my application and get back to work! –  timbrown Jul 11 at 3:54
1  
@Anticom, Here is a good resource for an explanation of TL;DR google.com/search?q=tldr –  Jeremy Moritz Aug 4 at 20:01
3  
Makes the most sense among all answers for people lacking the jargon. –  mostruash Aug 11 at 16:56
1  
This explanation is way better than the ProAngularJs book that I was following :) I got stuck in that chapters that was comparing Service, Factory & Provider but this post helped clear things out! Great work Tylor!! –  iNfinity Oct 8 at 4:18

Service vs provider vs factory: I am trying to keep it simple . Its all about basic JavaScript concept.

First of all lets talk about services in angularjs!

What is Service: In angularjs Service is nothing but a singleton javascript object which can store some useful methods or properties. This singleton object is created per ngApp(Angular app) basis and it is shared among all the controllers within current app. When Angularjs instantiate a service object, it register this service object with a unique service name. So each time when we need to get the service instance, Angular search the registry for this service name, and it returns the reference to service object.Now we can invoke method, access properties on service object. You may have question whether you can also put properties , methods on scope object of controllers! So why you need service object? Answers is: services are shared among multiple controller scope. If you put some properties/methods in a controller's scope object , it will be available to current controller scope only. But when you define methods,properties on service object, it will be available globally for every controller's scope for current angular app.

So If there are 3 controllers scope, Let it be controllerA, controllerB and controllerC , all will share same service instance.

<div ng-controller='controllerA'>
    <!-- controllerA scope -->
</div>
<div ng-controller='controllerB'>
    <!-- controllerB scope -->
</div>
<div ng-controller='controllerC'>
    <!-- controllerC scope -->
</div>

How to create a service?

Angularjs provide different methods to registering a service. Here we are going to focus on three methods factory(..),service(..),provide(..);

Use this link for code reference

Factory function:

we can define factory function as below.

factory('serviceName',function fnFactory(){ return serviceInstance;})

Angular provide factory() method which takes a JavaScript function as a parameter. Angular calls this passed function fnFactory() for creating service instance like below.

var serviceInstace = fnFactory(); 

The passed function can define a object and return that object , Angular simply store this object reference to a variable which is passed as first argument. Whatever we put on this object , will be available to service instance. Instead of returning object , we can also return function, values etc, Whatever we will return , will be available to service instance.

Example:

var app= angular.module('myApp', []);
//creating service using factory method
app.factory('factoryPattern',function(){  
  var data={
    'firstName':'Tom',
    'lastName':' Cruise',
    greet: function(){
      console.log('hello!' + this.firstName + this.lastName);
    }
  };
  //now all the properties and methods of data object will be available in our service object
  return data;  
});

Service Function:

service('serviceName',function fnServiceConstructor(){})

Its the another way, we can register a service. The only difference is the way Angular try to instantiate the service object. This time angular uses 'new' keyword and call the constructor function something like below.

var serviceInstance = new fnServiceConstructor();

In the constructor function we can use 'this' keyword for adding properties/methods to the service object. example:

//creating service using service method
var app= angular.module('myApp', []);
app.service('servicePattern',function(){
  this.firstName ='James';
  this.lastName =' Bond';
  this.greet = function(){
    console.log('My Name is '+ this.firstName + this.lastName);
  }; 
});

Provide function:

Provide() function is the another way for creating services. Let we are interested to create a service which just display some greeting message to the user. But we also want to provide a way so that user can set their own greeting message. In technical terms we want to create configurable services. How can we do this ? There must be a way, so that app could pass their custom greeting messages and Angularjs would make it available to factory/constructor function which create our services instance. In such a case provide() function do the job. using provide() function we can create configurable services.

We can create configurable services using provide syntax as given below.

/*step1:define a service */
app.provide('service',function serviceProviderConstructor(){});

/*step2:configure the service */
app.config(function configureService(serviceProvider){});

How does provider syntax internally work?

1.Provider object is created using constructor function we defined in our provide function.

var serviceProvider = new serviceProviderConstructor();

2.The function we passed in app.config(), get executed. This is called config phase, and here we have a chance to customize our service.

configureService(serviceProvider);

3.Finally service instance is created by calling $get method of serviceProvider.

serviceInstance = serviceProvider.$get()

Sample code for creating service using provide syntax:

var app= angular.module('myApp', []);
app.provider('providerPattern',function providerConstructor(){
  //this function works as constructor function for provider
  this.firstName = 'Arnold ';
  this.lastName = ' Schwarzenegger' ;
  this.greetMessage = ' Welcome, This is default Greeting Message' ;
  //adding some method which we can call in app.config() function
  this.setGreetMsg = function(msg){
    if(msg){
      this.greetMessage =  msg ;
    }  
  };
  //we can also add a method which can change firstName and lastName
  this.$get = function(){
    var firstName = this.firstName;
    var lastName = this.lastName ;
    var greetMessage = this.greetMessage;
    var data={
       greet: function(){
         console.log('hello, ' + firstName + lastName+'! '+ greetMessage);
       }      
    };
    return data ;
  }; 
});

app.config(
  function(providerPatternProvider){
    providerPatternProvider.setGreetMsg(' How do you do ?');
  }
);

Working Demo

Summary:


Factory use a factory function which return a service instance. serviceInstance = fnFactory();

Service use a constructor function and Angular invoke this constructor function using 'new' keyword for creating the service instance. serviceInstance = new fnServiceConstructor();

Provide defines a providerConstructor function, this providerConstructor function defines a factory function $get . Angular calls $get() to create the service object. Provide syntax has an added advantage of configuring the service object before it get instantiated. serviceInstance = $get();

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1  
Great explanation! –  Bram Oct 17 at 9:49

I noticed something interesting when playing around with providers. Visibility of injectables is different for providers than it is for services and factories. If you declare an angularjs "constant" (e.g. myApp.constant('a', 'Robert');), you can inject it into services, factories, and providers. But if you declare an angularjs "value" (e.g. myApp.value('b', {name: 'Jones'});), you can inject it into services and factories, but NOT into the provider-creating function. You can, however, inject it into the $get function that you define for your provider. This is mentioned in the Angular docs but it's easy to miss. You can find it on the %provide page in the sections on the value and constant methods.

http://jsfiddle.net/R2Frv/1/

<div ng-app="MyAppName">
    <div ng-controller="MyCtrl">
        <p>from Service: {{servGreet}}</p>
        <p>from Provider: {{provGreet}}</p>
    </div>
</div>

var myApp = angular.module('MyAppName', []);

myApp.constant('a', 'Robert');
myApp.value('b', {name: 'Jones'});

myApp.service('greetService', function(a,b) {
    this.greeter = 'Hi there, ' + a + ' ' + b.name;
});

myApp.provider('greetProvider', function(a) {
    this.firstName = a;
    this.$get = function(b) {
        this.lastName = b.name;
        this.fullName = this.firstName + ' ' + this.lastName;
        return this;
    };
});

function MyCtrl($scope, greetService, greetProvider) {
   $scope.servGreet = greetService.greeter;
    $scope.provGreet = greetProvider.fullName;
}
share|improve this answer
    
why this strange behavior? –  suzanshakya Oct 20 '13 at 19:14

Factory

You give angular a function, angular will cache and inject the return value when the factory is requested.

Example:

app.factory('factory', function() {
    var name = '';
    // Return value **is** the object that will be injected
    return {
        name: name;
    }
})

Usage:

app.controller('ctrl', function($scope, factory) {
     $scope.name = factory.name;
});

Service

You give angular a function, angular will call new to instantiate it. It is the instance that Angular creates that will be cached and injected when the service is requested. Since new was used to instantiate the service, the keyword this is valid and refers to the instance.

Example:

app.service('service', function() {
     var name = '';
     this.setName = function(newName) {
         name = newName;
     }
     this.getName = function() {
         return name;
     }
});

Usage:

app.controller('ctrl', function($scope, service) {
   $scope.name = service.getName();  
});

Provider

You give angular a function, angular will call its $get function. It is the return value from the $get function that will be cached and injected when the service is requested.

Providers allow you to configure the provider before angular calls the $get method to get the injectible.

Example:

app.provider('provider', function() {
     var name = '';
     this.setName = function(newName) {
          name = newName;
     }
     this.$get = function() {
         return { 
            name: name
         }
     }
})

Usage (as an injectable in a controller)

app.controller('ctrl', function($scope, provider) {
    $scope.name = provider.name;
});

Usage (configuring the provider before $get is called to create the injectable)

app.config(function(providerProvider) {
    providerProvider.setName('John');  
});
share|improve this answer

For me the best and the simplest way of understanding the difference:

var service, factory;
service = factory = function(injection) {}

How angular instantiates particular components (simplified):

// service
var angularService = new service(injection);

// factory
var angularFactory = factory(injection);

So, for the service, what becomes the angular component is the object instance of the class which is represented by service declaration function. For the factory, it is the result returned from factory declaration function. The factory may behave the same as the service:

var factoryAsService = function(injection) {
  return new function(injection) {
    // service content
  }
}

The simpliest way of thinking is the following one:

  • Service is an singleton object instance. Use services if you want to provide a singleton object for your code.
  • Factory is a class. Use factories if you want to provide custom classes for your code (can't be done with services because they are already instantiated).

The factory 'class' example is provided in the comments around, as well as provider difference.

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Please consider using this as a cheatsheet while learning Angular. http://demisx.github.io/angularjs/2014/09/14/angular-what-goes-where.html. This should provide a direction on what to place where in Angular.

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great work, thanks –  Allisone Sep 16 at 21:19

My understanding is very simple below.

Factory : you simply create a object inside of the factory and return it

Service :

you just have a standard function that uses this keyword to define function.

Provider :

There is a $get object that you define and it can be used to get the object that returns data

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Didn't you mixed up the Factory and Service ? Services creates where factory returns. –  Flavien Volken Nov 9 at 6:06
    
When you declaring service name as an injectable argument you will be provided with an instance of the function. In other words new FunctionYouPassedToService(). This object instance becomes the service object that AngularJS registers and injects later to other services / controllers if required. //factory When you declaring factoryname as an injectable argument you will be provided with the value that is returned by invoking the function reference passed to module.factory. –  sajan kumar Nov 23 at 4:31
    
Okay, so… in angular the factory is a singleton where the "service" is a actually a factory (in common design patterns terms) –  Flavien Volken Nov 23 at 8:24

For me the revelation came when I realized that they all work the same way: by running something once, storing the value they get, and then cough up that same stored value when referenced through Dependency Injection.

Say we have:

app.factory('a', fn);
app.service('b', fn);
app.provider('c', fn);

The difference between the three is that:

  1. a's stored value comes from running fn
  2. b’s stored value comes from newing fn
  3. c’s stored value comes from first getting an instance by newing fn, and then running a $get method of the instance

which means there’s something like a cache object inside Angular, whose value of each injection is only assigned once, when they've been injected the first time, and where:

cache.a = fn()
cache.b = new fn()
cache.c = (new fn()).$get()

This is why we use this in services, and define a this.$get in providers.

Hope this helps.

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An additional clarification is that factories can create functions/primitives, while services cannot. Check out this JSFiddle based on Epokk's: http://jsfiddle.net/skeller88/PxdSP/1351/.

The factory returns a function that can be invoked:

myApp.factory('helloWorldFromFactory', function() {
  return function() {
    return "Hello, World!";
  };
});

The factory can also return an object with a method that can be invoked:

myApp.factory('helloWorldFromFactory', function() {
  return {
    sayHello: function() {
      return "Hello, World!";
    }
  };
});

The service returns an object with a method that can be invoked:

myApp.service('helloWorldFromService', function() {
  this.sayHello = function() {
     return "Hello, World!";
  };
});

For more details, see a post I wrote on the difference: http://www.shanemkeller.com/tldr-services-vs-factories-in-angular/

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I see there are already a ton answers, some good and some better, still I think I could add my clarification in this matter.

Basically what all of the mentioned types (service, factory, provider etc.), are just creating and configuring global variables (that are of course global to the entire application) just as old fashioned global variables were.

While global variables are not recommended, the real usage of these global variables are to provide dependency injection, by passing the variable to the relevant controller.

There are many levels of complications in creating the values for the "global variables":

  1. Constant
    This defines an actual constant that should not be modified during the entire application, just like constants in other languages are (something that JavaScript lacks).
  2. Value
    This is a modifiable value or object, and it serves as some global variable, that can even be injected when creating other services or factories (see further on these), however it must be a "literal value", which means that one has to write out the actual value, and cannot use any computation or programming logic (in other words 39 or myText or {prop: "value"} are ok, but 2 +2 is not).
  3. Factory
    A more general value, that is possible to be computed right away, the way it works is by passing a function to angular with the logic needed to compute the value and angular executes it, and saves the return value in the named variable
    Note that it is possible to return a object (in which case it will function similar to a service) or a function (that will be saved in the variable as a callback function)
  4. Service
    A service is a more stripped down version of factory which is valid only when the value is an object, and allows for writing any logic directly in the function (as if it would be a constructor), as well as declaring and accessing the object properties using the this keyword.
  5. Provider
    Unlike a service which is a simplified version of factory, a provider is a more complex but more flexible way of initializing the "global" variables, with the biggest flexibility being the option to set values from the app.config.
    The way it works is like using a combination of service and provider, by passing to provider a function that has properties declared using the this keyword, which can be used from the app.config.
    Then it needs to have a separate $.get function which is executed by angular after setting the above properties via the app.config, and this $.get function behaves just as the factory above, in that it's return value is used to initialize the "global" variables.
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