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I'm new to groovy. I'm trying to figure out the basic syntax. The following code snippet:

def CRITICAL = 2;
def MAJOR = 3;
def MINOR = 9;
def GetPriorityFromString(String priorityStr) {
    switch (priorityStr){
        case "Critical" : return CRITICAL;
        case "Major" : return MAJOR;
        case "Minor" : return MINOR;
    }
    return 0;
}
GetPriorityFromString("Minor")

causes this error:

groovy.lang.MissingPropertyException: No such property: MINOR for class: Script21

What'm I doin wrong?

(And since I'm new to this language, feel free to suggest any "groovier" ways to translate a string into an enumerated value.)

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1  
Put it in a real class. –  Dave Newton Mar 27 '13 at 18:27

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Just use a map

def mapping =["CRITICAL": 2, "MAJOR" : 3, "MINOR": 9]
println mapping["MINOR"]

As for your original code: You have a problem with the scope of the variables. If you are in a script context you may not use "def" to declare global variables just leave it out and it will work.

CRITICAL = 2;
MAJOR = 3;
MINOR = 9;
def GetPriorityFromString(String priorityStr) {
    switch (priorityStr){
        case "Critical" : return CRITICAL;
        case "Major" : return MAJOR;
        case "Minor" : return MINOR;
    }
    return 0;
}
GetPriorityFromString("Minor")

If you put it into a normal class then you have to use the defs

class Test {
def CRITICAL = 2;
def MAJOR = 3;
def MINOR = 9;
def GetPriorityFromString(String priorityStr) {
    switch (priorityStr){
        case "Critical" : return CRITICAL;
        case "Major" : return MAJOR;
        case "Minor" : return MINOR;
    }
    return 0;
}
}
new Test().GetPriorityFromString("Minor")
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