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I have a Web API service that contains methods that all require security that is processed via logic implemented within a CustomAuthenticationHandler handler using the following:

protected override Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{
    //Security Logic

    //Return Task
}

However I have a method that I want publically exposed that does not require security. I'm trying to prevent having a separate service just for this one method that I do not require any security information. The following is how I've done this, and it works:

protected override Task<HttpResponseMessage> SendAsync(HttpRequestMessage request, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
{

  if (request.RequestUri.AbsolutePath == "/api/MyPublicNoSecurityNeededMethod")
       return base.SendAsync(request, cancellationToken).ContinueWith(task => task.Result);

    //Security Logic

    //Return Task
}

Thus I essentially return early and never go through the security logic. I'm wondering if there is anything wrong with this approach or if there is a more secure way of handling this need? If the answer is URLs can be spoofed, so doing that method of looking at the request could open up a backdoor, etc. that's what I'm trying to determine. I just don't want to expose my other methods to vulnerabilities if the way I've implemented this is not the correct way about solving this need.

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1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You use of HttpMessageHandler is incorrect. The handler should only authenticate the client and set the current principal in Thread.CurrentPrincipal and optionally in HttpContext.Current.User if the Web Api is hosted in ASP.NET. Then, the framework provides attributes that you can use to define authorization rules on the action such as the [AuthorizeAttribute] and [AllowAnonymous] attributes. Those attribute rely on the Current Principal to perform authorization.

public class HelloWorldController : ApiController
    {
        [Authorize]
        public string Get()
        {
            return "hello " + User.Identity.Name;
        }
    }

    public class HelloWorldAnonymousController : ApiController
    {
        [AllowAnonymous]
        public string Get()
        {
            return "hello anonymous";
        }
    }

Authorize specifies that the action requires an authenticated user. AllowAnonymous does not require any authenticated user. About your question, there is nothing wrong with having actions that does not require authentication.

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I actually did everything you state (I'm setting Thread.CurrentPrincipal with the IIdentity instance). However I added this to my Global.asax (GlobalConfiguration.Configuration.MessageHandlers.Add(new CustomAuthenticationHandler());) so the each API method did not require the [Authorize] attribute. Then I disallow access to the service early on if authentication is not valid. I din't want each Controller method to have to handle it's own authentication/authorization since the rules were the same for all methods (except this one that my OP is about). –  atconway Mar 27 '13 at 20:27
1  
So you can set the AuthorizeFilte globally so all the actions are secured by default, and override the actions that you want to have with anonymous access with the [AllowAnonymous] attribute –  Pablo Cibraro Mar 27 '13 at 20:36
    
Ok I see where you are going with this. So basically 1. my approach was incorrect. 2. If I move to using [Authorize] attributes, how do I intervene to provide more to the client than Authorization has been denied for this request, but rather something like: Authorization has been denied for this request. Your IP does not match the account credentials you provided? –  atconway Mar 27 '13 at 20:39
1  
You can derive the AuthorizeAttibute and add all the detail you want to the response. Does that make sense ? –  Pablo Cibraro Mar 27 '13 at 20:43
1  
Yes, your assumption is correct. The challenge must be sent only after executing base.SendAsync(..) when the HttpStatus code is unauthorized. base.SendAsync will try to execute the action, so if the framework finds an AllowAnonymous attribute, it will work. Otherwise, the framework will return a 401 that your handler can catch to optionally return a challenge. Makes sense ? Thanks –  Pablo Cibraro Apr 2 '13 at 14:35

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