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I am trying to identify the last letter within ID in a longitudinal data set.

Say my data looks like this,

dfL <- data.frame(ID = c(1L, 1L, 1L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 4L, 9L, 9L, 9L, 9L, 9L, 10L), week = c("BS", 4L, 6L, "BS", 6L, 9L, 9L, 12L, "BS", 4L, 6L, 9L, 12L, "BS"), outcome = c(14L, 28L, 42L, 14L, 46L, 64L, 71L, 85L, 14L, 28L, 51L, 66L, 84L, 0L), letter = c("a", "b", "a", "b", "a", "b", "a", "b", "a", "b", "a", "b", NA, NA)); dfL

Each ID have s string of letters (a and b's), I need to find the last letter within ID and put it up on the baseline.

   ID week outcome letter
1   1   BS      14      a
2   1    4      28      b
3   1    6      42      a
4   4   BS      14      b
5   4    6      46      a
6   4    9      64      b
7   4    9      71      a
8   4   12      85      b
9   9   BS      14      a
10  9    4      28      b
11  9    6      51      a
12  9    9      66      b
13  9   12      84   <NA>
14 10   BS       0   <NA>

I imagine the final result will look something like this,

   ID week outcome letter last_letter
1   1   BS      14      a      a
2   1    4      28      b   <NA>
3   1    6      42      a   <NA>
4   4   BS      14      b      b
5   4    6      46      a   <NA>   
6   4    9      64      b   <NA>
7   4    9      71      a   <NA>
8   4   12      85      b   <NA>
9   9   BS      14      a      b
10  9    4      28      b   <NA>
11  9    6      51      a   <NA>
12  9    9      66      b   <NA>
13  9   12      84   <NA>   <NA>
14 10   BS       0   <NA>   <NA>

I've fiddled around with which.max from the data.table package and with ave, but I'm still kinda stuck.

share|improve this question
    
In your example result, shouldn't row 4 have last_letter b? –  Matthew Plourde Mar 27 '13 at 18:59
    
@MatthewPlourde, you are right, I made a typo. Thanks for pointing it out. –  Eric Fail Mar 27 '13 at 22:00

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Using base R's ave I'd approach it with a custom function like this:

FUN <- function(x) {
    if (all(is.na(x))) return(NA)
    tail(na.omit(x), 1)
}

dfL$lastL <- with(dfL, ave(letter, ID, FUN=FUN))

##    ID week outcome letter lastL
## 1   1   BS      14      a     a
## 2   1    4      28      b     a
## 3   1    6      42      a     a
## 4   4   BS      14      b     b
## 5   4    6      46      a     b
## 6   4    9      64      b     b
## 7   4    9      71      a     b
## 8   4   12      85      b     b
## 9   9   BS      14      a     b
## 10  9    4      28      b     b
## 11  9    6      51      a     b
## 12  9    9      66      b     b
## 13  9   12      84   <NA>     b
## 14 10   BS       0   <NA>  <NA>

EDIT:

If you wanted it to look like yours with <NA> then this approach with tapply would work.

FUN <- function(x) {
    if (all(is.na(x))) {
        first <- NA
    } else {
        first <- tail(na.omit(x), 1)
    }
    out <- as.character(rep(NA, length(x)))
    out[1] <- as.character(first)
    out
}

dfL$lastL <- factor(unlist(with(dfL, tapply(letter, ID, FUN=FUN))))

##    ID week outcome letter lastL
## 1   1   BS      14      a     a
## 2   1    4      28      b  <NA>
## 3   1    6      42      a  <NA>
## 4   4   BS      14      b     b
## 5   4    6      46      a  <NA>
## 6   4    9      64      b  <NA>
## 7   4    9      71      a  <NA>
## 8   4   12      85      b  <NA>
## 9   9   BS      14      a     b
## 10  9    4      28      b  <NA>
## 11  9    6      51      a  <NA>
## 12  9    9      66      b  <NA>
## 13  9   12      84   <NA>  <NA>
## 14 10   BS       0   <NA>  <NA>
share|improve this answer
    
It's quite funny with those Split-Apply-Combine questions lately on SO, isn't it? In minutes, you get the triumvirate of possible solutions: base, data.table, plyr...Many roads lead to Rome, or to R happiness for that matter... +1 to your solutions. –  Christoph_J Mar 27 '13 at 19:07
    
+1 nice. You might even make this into a concise one-liner using if (all(is.na(x))) NA else tail(na.omit(x), 1) for your embedded function. –  Matthew Plourde Mar 27 '13 at 19:11
    
I'm adding that. I like it better but didn't think of it. –  Tyler Rinker Mar 27 '13 at 20:21

This is an approach with plyr: first omit NA, split by id and look at the last value. Then merge it back.

library(plyr)

last_letter <- ddply(na.omit(dfL), .(ID), function(x) tail(as.character(x$letter),1))
last_letter$week <- "BS"
names(last_letter)[2] <- "last_letter"
merge(dfL, last_letter, by = c("ID", "week"), all=TRUE)

   ID week outcome letter last_letter
1   1    4      28      b        <NA>
2   1    6      42      a        <NA>
3   1   BS      14      a           a
4   4   12      85      b        <NA>
5   4    6      46      a        <NA>
6   4    9      64      b        <NA>
7   4    9      71      a        <NA>
8   4   BS      14      b           b
9   9   12      84   <NA>        <NA>
10  9    4      28      b        <NA>
11  9    6      51      a        <NA>
12  9    9      66      b        <NA>
13  9   BS      14      a           b
14 10   BS       0   <NA>        <NA>
share|improve this answer

I hope I got your question right (I don't really know what the last letter is for each ID; I will assume it is the one with the highest outcome):

Here is then a data.table solution:

library(data.table)
dfL <- as.data.table(dfL)
setkey(dfL, ID, outcome)
intDT <- dfL[!is.na(letter), list(lastL = tail(letter, 1)), by=ID]
setkey(intDT, ID)
intDT[dfL]
    ID lastL week outcome letter
 1:  1     a   BS      14      a
 2:  1     a    4      28      b
 3:  1     a    6      42      a
 4:  4     b   BS      14      b
 5:  4     b    6      46      a
 6:  4     b    9      64      b
 7:  4     b    9      71      a
 8:  4     b   12      85      b
 9:  9     b   BS      14      a
10:  9     b    4      28      b
11:  9     b    6      51      a
12:  9     b    9      66      b
13:  9     b   12      84     NA
14: 10    NA   BS       0     NA

Just a short explanation of what I'm doing here: I sort dfL first and then I get for each ID (by=ID) the last value of letter (that is done with the function tail). After that, I have to merge the two data.tables again.

Even easier (thanks to Luciano`s comment):

dfL[!is.na(letter), lastL := tail(as.character(letter), 1), by=ID]
    ID week outcome letter lastL
 1:  1   BS      14      a     a
 2:  1    4      28      b     a
 3:  1    6      42      a     a
 4:  4   BS      14      b     b
 5:  4    6      46      a     b
 6:  4    9      64      b     b
 7:  4    9      71      a     b
 8:  4   12      85      b     b
 9:  9   BS      14      a     b
10:  9    4      28      b     b
11:  9    6      51      a     b
12:  9    9      66      b     b
13:  9   12      84     NA    NA
14: 10   BS       0     NA    NA

Here it's all done in one step. This, however, only works if you convert the column letter to character.

share|improve this answer
2  
I think this is because letter is actually a factor, so it's returning the underlieyng number –  Luciano Selzer Mar 27 '13 at 18:59
    
@LucianoSelzer Completely right, thanks a lot! I updated my answer accordingly. –  Christoph_J Mar 27 '13 at 19:02
    
Thank you for you response. I am sorry that my formulation of my question wasn't clear. There is an example of what I imagined the final result would look like in my question, there is a variable up there, that I generated, called last_letter. I am looking for the latter at the last week. –  Eric Fail Mar 27 '13 at 21:56

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