Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am creating my first MVC project, and was curious as to which is the correct way to expose my Code First Entity Classes to my view model. I have a entity class like so:

public class Product
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int CategoryId { get; set; }
    [StringLength(50)]
    public string ProductName { get; set; }
    public Nullable<System.DateTime> DateAdded { get; set; }
    [StringLength(50)]
    public string AddedBy { get; set; }
}

Is it better to pass in the object, or pass in the a new class of the properties?

public class ProductViewModel
{
    Product myProduct { get; set; }
}

public class ProductViewModel
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int CategoryId { get; set; }
    public string ProductName { get; set; }
    public DateTime DateAdded { get; set; }
    public string AddedBy { get; set; }
}
share|improve this question

closed as not constructive by Dan J, Joce, Steven Penny, drwelden, Mario Mar 27 '13 at 20:55

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
As the answers already given show, this is not a constructive question. One approach is not objectively better than the other. –  Dan J Mar 27 '13 at 19:36

3 Answers 3

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It's better to go with the second option. It's generally bad practice to use your database classes as models. What your first option essentially does is just that, except it wraps it inside another pointless class.

What I'd do though, is have them both implement an interface, that way if you ever want to change it, just change the interface, then both instances can be changed.

public class ProductViewModel : IProduct
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public int CategoryId { get; set; }
    [StringLength(50)]
    public string ProductName { get; set; }
    public DateTime DateAdded { get; set; }
    [StringLength(50)]
    public string AddedBy { get; set; }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
One advantage of Entity Framework is the ability to use plain objects as entities. These objects arguably make ideal models - providing a model layer on top of them also involves wrapping entities in "pointless" classes... –  Dan J Mar 27 '13 at 19:34
    
@DanJ Then there's no separation between the DTOs and the presentation layer. –  mattytommo Mar 27 '13 at 19:37
    
The View Model is the separation between the DTOs and the presentation layer. I think we may be defining "model" differently. –  Dan J Mar 27 '13 at 19:38
    
What if I wanted to have a ViewModel that was comprised of two different types of data. Say I wanted to use the IProduct interface, and I wanted to use an IComment Interface to return the product Information and comments. Would the correct way be to interface both of thee into a view model class then pass that to the view? –  ios85 Mar 27 '13 at 19:38
    
@DanJ Model != View Model. Not in the case of Entity Framework anyway. It's bad terminology. Database Classes and View Models would be better, it's not a good idea for them to be the same thing. –  mattytommo Mar 27 '13 at 19:39

It would be better to pass in the entity class as a whole. That way if the class ever changes, you will not have to update the properties in your ViewModel.

share|improve this answer

I'd definitely go with the second option. It provides a clear separation from your domain model (entity) and your view model. Separating these models is important because:

  • You have two very distinct types of concerns to address
    • Your domain deals with domain logic, actual business processes involved in managing your application's data.
    • Your view is focused on view logic, presenting a good user interface for interacting with that data.
  • You can separate the development efforts of your domain and interface layers. You want to minimize the impact that small changes in one layer have on your other layers.

Sure in this example it's kind of trivial, but it will be very important as you build more logic into your view.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.