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Maybe this could be very simple but I am confused about my little example.

public class Animal {
    public void eat() {
        System.out.println("Animal Eats");
    }

    public void shit() {
        System.out.println("Animal Shits");
    }
}

public class Cat extends Animal {
    @Override
    public void eat() {
        System.out.println("Cat Eats");
    }

    @Override
    public void shit() {
        System.out.println("Cat Shits");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Cat myCat = new Cat();
        myCat.eat();
        myCat.shit();

        Animal myAnimal = myCat;        
        myAnimal.eat();
        myAnimal.shit();

    }
}

Output that I am getting:

Cat Eats
Cat Shits
Cat Eats
Cat Shits

How can I call the eat and shit method of Animal class with myAnimal object in the code. Thanks.

So that I can get this output:

Cat Eats
Cat Shits
Animal Eats
Animal Shits
share|improve this question
1  
You want to call the animal implementation without the cat implementation? –  mthmulders Mar 27 '13 at 19:47
1  
myAnimal is a Cat, so it will use the overridden methods. Other than explicitly calling new Animal.eat(); etc, you can also create static versions of the eat and shit methods (although I would be careful calling a static shit...) and then call Animal.eat() and Animal.shit(). –  Jack Maney Mar 27 '13 at 19:50
1  
Unless you have a method in Cat witch calls super.eat(); you cannot do it directly from Cat –  A4L Mar 27 '13 at 19:51
3  
Hahaha! This example is awesome! –  user3139831 Aug 5 '14 at 22:18

8 Answers 8

up vote 13 down vote accepted

You cannot do what you want. The way polymorphism works is by doing what you are seeing.

Basically a cat always knows it is a cat and will always behave like a cat regardless of if you treat is as a Cat, Felis, Felinae, Felidae, Feliformia, Carnivora, Theria, Mammalia, Vertebrata, Chordata, Eumetazoa, Animalia, Animal, Object, or anything else :-)

share|improve this answer
    
Are you sure about it. –  Hisham Muneer Mar 27 '13 at 19:54
    
100% sure given the code you want to write. I will post another answer that will let you do what you are trying to do, but it won't be what you want to do... –  TofuBeer Mar 27 '13 at 19:55
    
I cast Reflection to this thread –  Funtik Mar 27 '13 at 19:56
9  
@Funtik - Don't start reflecting your shit()... :P –  Jack Maney Mar 27 '13 at 19:57
    
Thanks TofuBeer for the confirmation, I also searched it alot and didn't find any to do it. –  Hisham Muneer Mar 27 '13 at 20:00

Here you will have an option to choose which method do you want to invoke:

public class Cat extends Animal {

    public void superEat() {
        super.eat();
    }

    public void superShit() {
        super.shit();
    }

    @Override
    public void eat() {
        System.out.println("Cat Eats");
    }

    @Override
    public void shit() {
        System.out.println("Cat Shits");
    }
}
share|improve this answer

This line:

Animal myAnimal = myCat;

assigns the variable myAnimal to the object myCat, which you've created before. So when you call myAnimal.eat() after that, you're actually calling the method of the original myCat object, which outputs Cat Eats.

If you want to output Animal Eats, you'll have to assign an Animal instance to a variable. So if you would do this instead:

Animal myAnimal = new Animal()

the variable myAnimal will be an instance of Animal, and thus will overwrite the previous assignment to Cat.

If you will call myAnimal.eat() after this, you're actually calling the eat() method of the Animal instance you've created, which will output Animal Eats.

Concluding: your code should read:

public class Cat extends Animal {

@Override
public void eat() {
    System.out.println("Cat Eats");
}

@Override
public void shit() {
    System.out.println("Cat Shits");
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Cat myCat = new Cat();
    myCat.eat();
    myCat.shit();

    Animal myAnimal = new Animal();        
    myAnimal.eat();
    myAnimal.shit();

}
}
share|improve this answer

nice example.

As Animal class is not abstract, you can call its methods by creating a new instance of animal.

new Animal().shit();
share|improve this answer
1  
Well that is obvious but can I do this with myAnimal object in any way....thanks for replying. –  Hisham Muneer Mar 27 '13 at 19:49
1  
i think he wants to call Animal's method from a Cat instance –  A4L Mar 27 '13 at 19:49
4  
from inside Cat instance you can call super.shit() :D –  Funtik Mar 27 '13 at 19:50
1  
If you take a public super.shit(), then you'll be added to a very special List... –  Jack Maney Mar 27 '13 at 19:55

Please don't vote on this answer... you can vote on the other one :-) This is a bad answer, but shows how you would do what you are trying to do... poorly.

public class Main
{
    public static void main(final String[] argv) 
    {        
        Child  child;
        Parent parent;

        child  = new Child();
        parent = child;

        child.a();
        parent.a();
        child.otherA();
        parent.otherA();
    }
}

class Parent
{
    public void a()
    {
        System.out.println("Parent.a()");
    }

    public void otherA()
    {
        // doesn't matter what goes here... really should be abstract
    }
}

class Child
    extends Parent
{
    @Override
    public void a()
    {
        System.out.println("Child.a()");
    }

    @Override
    public void otherA()
    {
        super.a();
    }
}
share|improve this answer

Cat can't stop being a cat, even if it is an animal. Cat will eat and cat will poop in a cat's way. It might be similar to what an Animal does, which is why it overrides the method. If you want it to do what the animal does by default, don't override. You could probably do some weird crap with reflection and make separate methods that access the parent methods such as:

public void superShit() {
   Animal.class.getMethod("shit").invoke();
}

but that might be overkill don't you think?

Of course that probably wouldn't work since it's not static.

share|improve this answer

If you make methods in the each class static, that should work.

public class Animal {

    public static void eat() {
        System.out.println("Animal Eats");
    }

    public static void shit() {
        System.out.println("Animal Shits");
    }
}


public class Cat extends Animal {
@Override
public static void eat() {
    System.out.println("Cat Eats");
}

@Override
public static void shit() {
    System.out.println("Cat Shits");
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    Cat myCat = new Cat();
    myCat.eat();
    myCat.shit();

    Animal myAnimal = myCat;        
    myAnimal.eat();
    myAnimal.shit();

}
}

This should give following output -

Cat Eats
Cat Shits
Animal Eats
Animal Shits
share|improve this answer
1  
I don't think that's what the OP is asking for, he wants to be able to access the overridden method in an instantiated Object, I would go for something else like redesigning the objects if that is what he is requiring. –  Goodwine May 15 '14 at 0:02

You can create constructor for class Animal, that takes another Animas as parameter, and creates new instance based on provided one.

public class Animal {
    //some common animal's properties
    private int weight;
    private int age;

    public Animal() {
        // empty.
    }

    public Animal(final Animal otherAnimal) {
        this.weight = otherAnimal.getWeight();
        this.age = otherAnimal.getAge();
    }

    public void eat() {
        System.out.println("Animal Eats");
    }

    public void shit() {
        System.out.println("Animal Shits");
    }

    // setters and getters.
}



public class Cat extends Animal {
    @Override
    public void eat() {
        System.out.println("Cat Eats");
    }

    @Override
    public void shit() {
        System.out.println("Cat Shits");
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Cat myCat = new Cat();
        myCat.eat();
        myCat.shit();

        // note: myAnimal is not a Cat, it's just an Animal.
        Animal myAnimal = new Animal(myCat);         
        myAnimal.eat();
        myAnimal.shit();

    }
}
share|improve this answer

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