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I've struggled long enough on my own to find an answer. I promise I'll try to learn from the solutions. For the sake of learning, I would like to understand how to do it with explicit loops, but if you want to share a vectorized approach as a bonus that is also greatly appreciated.

Say I'm going to play a game once each day and I know the probability of victory each day. I want a function which takes that vector of probabilities and returns the cumulative probability of success on at least one day. So if I play for 3 days in a row and the probability of victory was 0.5 each day then my function should return "0.875, 0.75, 0.5"

Here is my most recent failed attempt at writing this function:

prob_cum <- function(prob_today) {
  p_cum <- rep(0, length(prob_today))
  for (i in 1:length(prob_today)) {
    for (j in i:length(prob_today)) {
      p_cum[j] <- p_cum[j-1] - ((1 - p_cum[j-1]) * prob_today[j])
    }
  }
  p_cum
}

prob_daily <- c(.5,.5,.5)
prob_cum(prob_daily)
share|improve this question
    
Standard-Statistical-Trick:: If the task is for probability on any day prior to day X then you can subtract the probability of non-success to day X from 1. (I also do not understand why the order should not be: .5, .75, .875?) –  BondedDust Mar 27 '13 at 20:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Working though each problem at a time:

You have a loop over i which doesn't do anything; it just performs the same calculations multiple times and each time overwrites the results (with the same results). Drop that.

prob_cum <- function(prob_today) {
  p_cum <- rep(0, length(prob_today))
  for (j in i:length(prob_today)) {
    p_cum[j] <- p_cum[j-1] - ((1 - p_cum[j-1]) * prob_today[j])
  }
  p_cum
}

This still has problems. For j=1, you try to access p_cum[0] which is a zero-length vector and your calculation assumes a one-length vector. That is why you get the error message

Error in p_cum[j] <- p_cum[j - 1] - ((1 - p_cum[j - 1]) * prob_today[j]) : 
  replacement has length zero

Initialize p_cum[1] and then loop over the rest.

prob_cum <- function(prob_today) {
  p_cum <- rep(0, length(prob_today))
  p_cum[1] <- prob_today[1]
  for (j in 2:length(prob_today)) {
    p_cum[j] <- p_cum[j-1] - ((1 - p_cum[j-1]) * prob_today[j])
  }
  p_cum
}

This looping construct is potentially dangerous. It works so long as prob_today is at least length 2 but will behave unexpectedly if the length is 1. Better is

prob_cum <- function(prob_today) {
  p_cum <- rep(0, length(prob_today))
  p_cum[1] <- prob_today[1]
  for (j in seq_along(prob_today)[-1]) {
    p_cum[j] <- p_cum[j-1] - ((1 - p_cum[j-1]) * prob_today[j])
  }
  p_cum
}

Now we get to a real problem: your algorithm is wrong. The probability of getting at least one win by day j is the probability of getting at least one by day j-1 PLUS the probability of getting a win on day j given that there hasn't been a win to that point. You have a minus.

prob_cum <- function(prob_today) {
  p_cum <- rep(0, length(prob_today))
  p_cum[1] <- prob_today[1]
  for (j in seq_along(prob_today)[-1]) {
    p_cum[j] <- p_cum[j-1] + ((1 - p_cum[j-1]) * prob_today[j])
  }
  p_cum
}

Now you have a function that works:

> prob_cum(prob_daily)
[1] 0.500 0.750 0.875
> prob_cum(c(0.5, 0.01, 0.99))
[1] 0.50000 0.50500 0.99505

The fully vectorized solution follows from expressing the probability differently. The probability of getting at least one win is 1 minus the probability of getting all losses up to that day. Those are independent probabilities, so are just a product of getting a loss each day.

prob_cum <- function(prob_today) {
  1 - cumprod(1-prob_today)
}

which gives the same results

> prob_cum(prob_daily)
[1] 0.500 0.750 0.875
> prob_cum(c(0.5, 0.01, 0.99))
[1] 0.50000 0.50500 0.99505

and works for single values and empty vectors without any additional adjustments needed

> prob_cum(c(0.75))
[1] 0.75
> prob_cum(c())
numeric(0)
share|improve this answer
    
~60 times slower than the vectorized approach. –  BondedDust Mar 27 '13 at 22:30
    
@DWin I'm somewhat surprised it is even that fast. Although it does use pre-allocation rather than extending vectors which is where many loop-based solutions really slow down. But given that the question asked for a loop based solution, acknowledging that vectorization would be good to know too, I gave a loop based solution. –  Brian Diggs Mar 27 '13 at 22:41
    
I actually read it incorrectly. I thought it said 'without loops' but that was perhaps just my brain stuck in the "forward"-mode. –  BondedDust Mar 28 '13 at 0:41
>  1 - cumprod( 1- c(0.5,0.5,0.5) )
[1] 0.500 0.750 0.875
 # (1- prob_success) is the prob_non_success vector

Easily wrapped into a function if needed. Your intial test was not a good one because it did not disclose my original error in not subtracting the success vector from 1 within the cumprod argument.

 vec<-runif(100)
 prob_cum <- function(prob_today) {
   p_cum <- rep(0, length(prob_today))
   p_cum[1] <- prob_today[1]
   for (j in seq_along(prob_today)[-1]) {
     p_cum[j] <- p_cum[j-1] + ((1 - p_cum[j-1]) * prob_today[j])
   }
   p_cum
 }
 Prob_vec <- function(vec) 1 - cumprod( 1- vec) 
 require(rbenchmark)
 benchmark( prob_cum(vec) , Prob_vec(vec) ,replications=1000)
#           test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
#1 prob_cum(vec)         1000   0.538   59.778     0.532    0.008          0         0
#2 Prob_vec(vec)         1000   0.009    1.000     0.008    0.002          0         0
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