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I am trying out try-catch blocks for the first time, and I want to make my catch{} block so if it catches an exception, it will go back to the original try{} block until the value passed in by the user is valid.

Say I have the following code:

try{
    number=keyboard.nextInt();
    }
catch(InputMismatchException e){
     System.out.println("That is not an integer!");
     }

Edit:

I added a while loop around the whole thing as adviced, so now I have the following:

boolean check=true;
    while(check){
        try{
            System.out.println("hey");
            number=keyboard.nextInt();
            check=false;
            }
        catch(InputMismatchException e){
            System.out.println("That is not an integer!");
            }
    }

I am now getting an infinite loop for some reason when I pass in a wrong value for the scanner keyboard. It is getting into the try every time, but it is not calling the nextInt() method every time. Anyone knows why?

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closed as not a real question by DarkAjax, Derek 朕會功夫, Sindre Sorhus, Steven Penny, Iswanto San Mar 28 '13 at 0:06

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
okay... say you have the following code... and then? –  Daedalus Mar 27 '13 at 20:13
    
What's your question? Please specify your question! –  boomz Mar 27 '13 at 20:15

5 Answers 5

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Reason for infinite loop:

The reason why it was causing an infinite loop was that the Scanner.nextInt() will not advance the scanner if there is an exception happening.

On the execution of method keyboard.nextInt(), the InputMismatchException happens if user enters a non-integer and it directly goes to the catch block where it print some message. The while loop executes again since the flag is still true. Since the scanner was not advanced in the previous loop, the same exception happens again and it goes to catch block. This repeats and causes an infinite loop

Fix:

The scanner needs to be advanced if the InputMismatchException happens. Based on the program requirement, it can discard the current line in scanner if it is non-integer and wait for the next input from user. Call Scanner.nextLine() or any method in such a scenario (from the catch block).

See the modified code below and it works.

while (check)
    {
        try
        {
            System.out.println("hey");
            int number = keyboard.nextInt();
            check = false;
            System.out.println("Number accepted !");
        } catch (Exception e)
        {
            System.out.println("That is not an integer! - " + keyboard.nextLine());
        }
    }
share|improve this answer

Do like this.

boolean flag = true;
int number= 0;
while(flag)
{
    try {
        number=keyboard.nextInt();
        flag = false;
    } 
    catch (InputMismatchException  e1) {
        System.out.println("That is not an integer!");                
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Hey, I tried your solution, yet it did not work, it somehow continues to iterate in the while without going to the scanner's nextInt() method call. See the edit above if you can. Thank you. –  Blessoul Mar 27 '13 at 20:39
    
@user2217183 Its might be because some error other than InputMismatchException that why you are getting into infinite loop. have you initialize the keyboard. –  TGMCians Mar 27 '13 at 20:44

Wrap the whole thing in a while (true) loop, and then break out of it if you reach the line after nextInt().

share|improve this answer
while(true)
{
    try
    {
        number = keyboard.nextInt();
    }
    catch(InputMismatchException e)
    {
         System.out.println("That is not an integer!");
         continue;
    }
    break;
}
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2  
because we really miss go-to? –  Dale Wilson Mar 27 '13 at 20:14
1  
Whilst functionally correct, while (true) is generally considered bad practice. See stackoverflow.com/questions/390481/… –  jazzbassrob Mar 27 '13 at 20:15

Put it inside a while loop.

boolean hasnum = false;
do {
    try{
        number=keyboard.nextInt();
        hasnum = true;
        }
    catch(InputMismatchException e){
        System.out.println("That is not an integer!");
        }
} while (!hasnum)
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