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This page talks about the Infamous Loop Problem:

function addLinks () {
    for (var i=0, link; i<5; i++) {
        link = document.createElement("a");
        link.innerHTML = "Link " + i;
        link.onclick = function () {
            alert(i);
        };
        document.body.appendChild(link);
    }
}
window.onload = addLinks;

And one solution:

function addLinks () {
    for (var i=0, link; i<5; i++) {
        link = document.createElement("a");
        link.innerHTML = "Link " + i;
        link.onclick = function (num) {
            return function () {
                alert(num);
            };
        }(i);
        document.body.appendChild(link);
    }
}
window.onload = addLinks;

Here's my question: Is the infamous loop problem still a problem if the function you are calling is outside of the parent function (in example, outside of addLinks)?

function addLinks () {
    for (var i=0, link; i<5; i++) {
        link = document.createElement("a");
        link.innerHTML = "Link " + i;
        link.onclick = Outside(i);
        document.body.appendChild(link);
    }
}
function Outside(i) {
    alert(i);
};
window.onload = addLinks;

I think it will because the problem is created because addLinks isn't created yet when onclick is being called as a function. So putting the function Outside of addLInks should alleviate the infamous loop problem, no?

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem in your code is that it doesn't work.

link.onclick = Outside(i);

doesn't bind a function, as Outside(i) returns undefined.

A similar, working solution would be to define Outside as

function Outside(i) {
    return function() {
       alert(i);
    }
};

it would work for the same reason your second code works : calling the function Outside creates a new scope for the variable i (it's called a closure).

Any solution you'll build from your loop will probably involve more than just a function call : it'll need the declaration of a variable, either with the var keyword or as an argument of that function.

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link.onclick = Outside(i);

That will actually call Outside(i) rather than set the listener equal to that function with that default value. Various toolkits like Ext provide a way to create delegates similar to what dystroy showed. For example, in Ext 3.X you could do this:

link.onclick = Outside.createDelegate(link, [i]) to create a delegate that has link as the this context and i as the default parameter to Outside.

To make your example work, you'd need to do this:

function Outside(i) {
    return function() { alert(i); }
};
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The code you have written will not run I believe.

Outside does not return anything. So calling Outside(i) will return undefined. Which means you are setting link.onclick=undefined.

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