Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm brushing up on my JS, and I don't know how to ask this, exactly.

I have this:

text_area.onkeyup = function() {
  var text_length    = this.value.length;
  var text_remaining = text_max - text_length;

  feed_back.innerHTML = "<strong>" + text_remaining + "</strong> charactres remaining";
} 

It works. However, should I be able to take the function and pull it out to something like this?

function countDown() {
  var text_length    = this.value.length;
  var text_remaining = text_max - text_length;

  feed_back.innerHTML = "<strong>" + text_remaining + "</strong> charactres remaining";
}

and just call the function by its name?

text_area.onkeyup = countDown();

This has never worked for me, across multiple projects.

Should it? Why doesn't it?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is that you're executing the function during the assignment, so the return value from the function becomes attached to the event. Instead you should attach a reference:

text_area.onkeyup = countDown

Or if countdown has parameters you want to pass with it then you can use a function to make sure they don't get lost. Something like this:

text_area.onkeyup = function(){ countDown(paremeter1, paremeter2); }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for pointing out the function() {...} part. That's really useful. –  nobrandheroes Mar 29 '13 at 2:03

You'll have to use:

text_area.onkeyup = countDown;

Without the parenthesis.

countDown is a reference to the actual function object countDown. It's simply a reference, and the function won't be called or executed.

countDown() actually calls the function, and evaluates to whatever it returns.

share|improve this answer

It doesn't work because () actually calls the function -- effectively setting text_area.onkeyup to the return value of countDown rather than the function itself.

Try this instead:

text_area.onkeyup = countDown;
share|improve this answer

It shouldn't because you're assigning the result of a function call instead of a function reference. Should be:

text_area.onkeyup = countDown;
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.