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I'm developing an application using Java Opencv-2.4.4 and swing GUI. Problem is that I'm unable to find any solution, that shows efficient way how to print processed image (saved in Mat object) to java swing GUI. For this moment I'm using this clumsy solution:

javax.swing.JLabel outputImage;
outputImage.setIcon(new javax.swing.ImageIcon("/home/username/Output.png"));

private void sliderStateChanged(javax.swing.event.ChangeEvent evt) { 
       .
       .
  Mat canny; // Here is saved what I want to plot
  String filename = "/home/username/Output.png";
  Highgui.imwrite(filename, canny);  // write to disk
  outputImage.setIcon(new ImageIcon(ImageIO.read(new File(filename)))); //update Icon
       .
       .
}

When user changes some values, inputs etc ., in GUI I have to overwrite Output.png on disk and update jLabel with new image from disk.

Is there any more elegant / efficient solution to this ? Is it posible to plot or convert Mat object directly to Canvas or Image or anything that is printable as image in swing ?

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up vote 8 down vote accepted

jpeg encoding is interesting, but there are a couple problems:

  • it is not a lossless format, you will lose image data when compressing
  • it takes quite a while (around 6 to 10 times longer than the suggested one below)
public Image toBufferedImage(Mat m){
      int type = BufferedImage.TYPE_BYTE_GRAY;
      if ( m.channels() > 1 ) {
          type = BufferedImage.TYPE_3BYTE_BGR;
      }
      int bufferSize = m.channels()*m.cols()*m.rows();
      byte [] b = new byte[bufferSize];
      m.get(0,0,b); // get all the pixels
      BufferedImage image = new BufferedImage(m.cols(),m.rows(), type);
      final byte[] targetPixels = ((DataBufferByte) image.getRaster().getDataBuffer()).getData();
      System.arraycopy(b, 0, targetPixels, 0, b.length);  
      return image;

  }
share|improve this answer
    
just one note: in imencode() function you can set ".png" as well. It depends of programmer needs, so there is no loss of information – andriy Dec 31 '13 at 14:11
    
I see. The problem is that it takes too long. The above procedure is close to the fastest possible. I believe that only pointing to native memory would be faster. – dannyxyz22 Jan 15 '14 at 4:29
    
The solution that I've proposed will load image to GUI fast enough, but anyway, I found your answer very helpful. I use this technique(transform Mat into BufferedImage) when first processing image in OpenCV and than in ImageJ and doing it with thousands of images. And here the speed is really matters – andriy Jan 15 '14 at 9:04

Yes there is more elegant way to do it. You can concert Mat to BufferedImage type and then just Load it with swing. The code to convert it to Buffered image is:

    Mat image_tmp = your image

    MatOfByte matOfByte = new MatOfByte();

    Highgui.imencode(".jpg", image_tmp, matOfByte); 

    byte[] byteArray = matOfByte.toArray();
    BufferedImage bufImage = null;

    try {

        InputStream in = new ByteArrayInputStream(byteArray);
        bufImage = ImageIO.read(in);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }

And then you just can paint it in your GUI object:

g.drawImage(bufImage , 0, 0, null);

where g is of type Graphics

Hope this helps.

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This is a readymade solution for Imshow() equivalent in Java OpenCV Its simple to use. API will look like:

Imshow im = new Imshow("Title");
im.showImage(matimage);

Visit here https://github.com/master-atul/ImShow-Java-OpenCV

This is a better solution as you don't store the image into disk and read again. Hence it reduces the overhead of reading from a disk and thus is faster.

share|improve this answer
    
Hi MMD, I like the idea of wrapping up every Swing GUI to make a more concise Imshow class. I just think you should use my approach in the showImage(Mat img) method, because it's around 5 times faster. Thanks for the class =) – dannyxyz22 Apr 6 '14 at 3:32
    
Thanks for the comment .. i ll incorporate it ... – Atul Apr 14 '14 at 2:48

Using @andriy's anwser. I came up with this solution. I used JFrame instead of Graphics. Hope this helps.

public void imshow(Mat src){
    BufferedImage bufImage = null;
    try {
        MatOfByte matOfByte = new MatOfByte();
        Highgui.imencode(".jpg", src, matOfByte); 
        byte[] byteArray = matOfByte.toArray();
        InputStream in = new ByteArrayInputStream(byteArray);
        bufImage = ImageIO.read(in);

        JFrame frame = new JFrame("Image");
        frame.getContentPane().setLayout(new FlowLayout());
        frame.getContentPane().add(new JLabel(new ImageIcon(bufImage)));
        frame.pack();
        frame.setVisible(true);
        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(JFrame.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
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