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This is my first post here, but I've been using stackoverflow as a supplement for my coding for as long as I can remember! So thanks to those fine folks who answer questions so wonderfully!

I have a little, probably trivial c++ problem. Recently started c++ after a longish history in Java.

Hope you can help!

I am implementing a doubly linked list class of sorts which stores 'buckets' (the nodes), which each contain a predefined number of characters. Each bucket stores a pointer to the next and previous bucket, and the list class (BucketString) stores a pointer to the head Bucket. I am compiling using g++ which throws the error

terminate called after throwing an instance of 'std::bad_alloc'
  what(): std::bad_alloc
make: *** [run] Aborted (core dumped)

whenever I run the code and add a string of characters to the list, using the following add method, which is contained within my bucket class, and is called from the list class's own methods whenever needed.

Code:

std::size_t bucketSizeB;
int filled;
char* str;
Bucket* next;
Bucket* prev;

Bucket::Bucket() : bucketSizeB(7), str(new char[7]), next(NULL), prev(NULL), filled(0)
{}

Bucket::Bucket(std::size_t bucketSizeB_) : bucketSizeB(bucketSizeB_), str(new char[bucketSizeB]), next(NULL), prev (NULL), filled(0)
{}

Bucket::Bucket(const Bucket& rhs) : bucketSizeB(rhs.bucketSizeB), next(rhs.next), prev(rhs.prev), filled(rhs.filled)
{
    for (int i = 0 ; i < (int) bucketSizeB ; i++)
    {
        str[i] = rhs.str[i];
    }
}

void Bucket::add(std::string line)
{

    int diff = bucketSizeB - filled;    //if the bucket is already partially filled


    std::string tmp = line.substr(0, diff);

    for (std::size_t i = 0 ; i < tmp.length() ; i++)
    {

        str[filled] = line[i];
        ++filled;
    }

    if (line.length() > bucketSizeB)
    {

        next = new Bucket(bucketSizeB);

        next->prev = this;
        next->add(line.substr(diff, line.length()-diff));
    }
}
Bucket::~Bucket()
{
    if (prev)
    {
        if (next)
        {
            prev->next = next;
        }
        else
        {
            prev->next = NULL;
        }
    }
    if (next)
    {
        if (prev)
        {
            next->prev = prev;
        }
        else
        {
            next->prev = NULL;
        }
    }
    delete [] Bucket::str;
}

When the error is thrown, the add method is being called from the 'list' class member method append, which works as follows:

void BucketString::append (std::string& line)
{
    length += line.length();    //Just a way to store the length of the string stored in this BucketString object

    if (!head)   //If the head node pointer is currently null, create a new head pointer
    {

        head = new Bucket(bucketSize);
    }

    Bucket* tmp = head;

    while (tmp->next)   //Finds the tail node
    {
        tmp = tmp->next;
    }
    tmp->add(line);   //Calls the Bucket add function on the tail node
}

The header file for the bucket class is:

#include <cstddef>
#include <string>
#include <iostream>

#ifndef BUCKET_H_
#define BUCKET_H_

namespace RBNWES001
{
class Bucket
{

    public:
        //Special members and overloaded constructor
        Bucket(void);
        Bucket(std::size_t);
        Bucket(const Bucket&);
        ~Bucket();
        //Copy Assignment not included because it's not needed, I'm the only one who is gonna use this code! :)

        //Add method
        void add(std::string);

        int filled;
        char* str;
        Bucket* next;
        Bucket* prev;
        std::size_t bucketSizeB;
};
}

#endif

Hopefully I've included enough of the code here for you to be able to see the error of my ways!

share|improve this question
    
Welcome to SO, but let me ask you: What have you tried? Have you added print-statements to see where the error comes from? Have you used a debugger? (And no, the code you showed is not enough) –  Daniel Frey Mar 27 '13 at 23:09
    
I have added said print statements, which is how I know it's being thrown when this method is called. Strange thing is that the method seems to work properly for the first 70 or so characters added, but then the message is thrown. What more would you like? Unfortunately the 'list' class is pretty long, I'll include the method in the 'list' class (called BucketString) that calls this method, if that helps somewhat. –  wesrobin Mar 27 '13 at 23:13
    
bad_alloc is thrown by operator new when it's out of memory. Since add uses recursion, perhaps you are recursion-ing yourself out of memory. –  CaptainMurphy Mar 27 '13 at 23:13
    
Add a print-statement before next = new Bucket(bucketSizeB); and print bucketSizeB, see if it becomes too large. –  Daniel Frey Mar 27 '13 at 23:16
    
Sorry, I see the need now to add more code. Certainly not as local-an error as I thought. But it seems like it's just a memory issue, so I'll print out a whole lot of stuff and see if it finds the problem. Thanks! –  wesrobin Mar 27 '13 at 23:25

2 Answers 2

1) You can prevent termination with a try/catch block.

2) It sounds like this is occurring when you execute the program. It also sounds like "make" executes the program automatically. Correct?

3) If so, you want to look in a debugger and identify the exact line where it's crashing.

4) I suspect if you trace through the code you'll see that one or more of "diff", "bucketSizeB" and/or "filled" become very large (or negative). Which would be a bug :) Which you can easily fix - once you find it.

5) Here's are good tutorials on GDB, if that happens to be a convenient debugger for you:

http://dirac.org/linux/gdb/

http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~gilpin/tutorial/

http://www.cprogramming.com/gdbtutorial.html

share|improve this answer
    
1) hides the error and makes things worse, it won't solve the problem. 2) is irrelevant. 3) should be (already is) a comment. –  Daniel Frey Mar 27 '13 at 23:12
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Oh my. Found the error. I've no idea why, but apparently in my Bucket(std::size_t bucketSizeB) constructor the initialiser for str should change from str(new char[bucketSizeB] to str(new char[bucketSizeB_]) (ie. use the argument passed to the cosntructor instead of using the bucketSizeB variable).

Ugh.

share|improve this answer
    
Because members are initialized in the order they are declared. You should get a warning for this if your compiler settings are high enough. –  GManNickG Mar 28 '13 at 2:52
    
@GManNickG, I don't see why you'd get a warning for his specific error. The bucketSizeB variable was defined earlier as a global... –  Alexis Wilke Oct 13 '14 at 0:04

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