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I'm trying to import an image file, such as file.bmp, read the RGB values of each pixel in the image, and then output the highest RGB valued pixel (the brightest pixel) for each row to the screen. Any suggestions on how to do it using Python?

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2 Answers

You can make a lot of use of the power of numpy here. Note that the code below outputs "brightness" in the range [0, 255].

#!/bin/env python

import numpy as np
from scipy.misc import imread

#Read in the image
img = imread('/users/solbrig/smooth_test5.png')

#Sum the colors to get brightness
brightness = img.sum(axis=2) / img.shape[2]

#Find the maximum brightness in each row
row_max = np.amax(brightness, axis=1)
print row_max

If you think your image might have an alpha layer, you can do this:

#!/bin/env python

import numpy as np
from scipy.misc import imread

#Read in the image
img = imread('/users/solbrig/smooth_test5.png')

#Pull off alpha layer
if img.shape[2] == 4:
    alph = img[:,:,3]/255.0
    img = img[:,:,0:3]
else:
    alph = np.ones(img.shape[0:1])

#Sum the colors to get brightness
brightness = img.sum(axis=2) / img.shape[2]
brightness *= alph

#Find the maximum brightness in each row
row_max = np.amax(brightness, axis=1)
print row_max
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I wasn't aware of the axis argument for sum() in numpy. Nice solution. –  kobejohn Mar 28 '13 at 3:33
1  
Most of the element-wise mathematical functions allow the axis keyword. It's amazingly useful. –  Vorticity Mar 28 '13 at 18:53
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Well, you could use scipy.misc.imread to read the image and manipulate it like so:

import scipy.misc
file_array = scipy.misc.imread("file.bmp")

def get_brightness(pixel_tuple):
   return sum([component*component for component in pixel_tuple])**.5 # distance from (0, 0, 0)

row_maxima = {}
height, width = len(file_array), len(file_array[0])
for y in range(height):
  for x in range(width):
    pixel = tuple(file_array[y][x]) # casting it to a tuple so it can be stored in the dict
    if y in row_maxima and get_brightness(pixel) > row_maxima[y]:
      row_maxima[y] = pixel
    if y not in row_maxima:
      row_maxima[y] = pixel
print row_maxima
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When I tried running this code, it said that "image" was not defined: line 11, in <module> pixel = tuple(image[y][x]) # casting it to a tuple so it can be stored in the dict NameError: name 'image' is not defined What would you define image as? I'm new at python, sorry. –  Samantha Suzanne Tabor Mar 28 '13 at 2:46
    
Oh, sorry, it was a typo on my part. Image should have been file_array. I've updated it. –  Marc Laugharn Mar 28 '13 at 3:19
1  
I haven't seen the rgb distance from (0,0,0) method for calculating brightness. I think a standard method would use 30% of the red value + 60% of the green value + 10% of the blue value to match human visual sensitivity. See sandbox.mc.edu/friendly_python/lab4.html –  BBrown May 9 '13 at 21:28
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