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I have a FLOAT field for a date which looks like this:

+-----------+
| FloatDate |
+-----------+
| 1012013   | -- Jan 1
| 3262013   | -- Mar 26
| 11072013  | -- Nov 7
| 10012013  | -- Oct 1
+-----------+

and I want to insert this data to another table, and the datatype of its dateField is DATETIME.

So, I'm trying to convert FloatDate values to DATETIME but I'm just keeping failing..

I've tried

INSERT INTO NEWTABLE 
(DateTimeDate)
SELECT CONVERT(DATETIME, CAST(CAST(FloatDate AS INTEGER) AS CHAR), 112)
FROM OLDTABLE

but this gives me an error that says

Conversion failed when converting datetime from character string

It seems that it works if the date format of FloatDate is YYYYMMDD. So, if I do this, it works.

DECLARE @test FLOAT
SET @test = 2132013                                                                                                                            
SELECT @test,  CONVERT(DATETIME, CAST(RIGHT(CAST(@test AS INTEGER), 4) AS CHAR(4)) + 
CASE WHEN LEN(CAST(@test AS INTEGER)) = 7 THEN '0' + CAST(LEFT(CAST(@test AS INTEGER), 3) AS CHAR(3))
     WHEN LEN(CAST(@test AS INTEGER)) = 8 THEN CAST(LEFT(CAST(@test AS INTEGER), 4) AS CHAR(4)) END, 1)

But, I'm wondering if I'm making this too complicated and just missing the simpler solution, or is this the only way I can achieve??

share|improve this question
3  
Is 3262013 March 26, 2013? If so, can you show us what March 9th might look like, and October 5th, and January 11th? – Aaron Bertrand Mar 28 '13 at 0:29
5  
Why in the world are you abusing the poor floating point datatype to perform such unholy rites? – Jake Heidt Mar 28 '13 at 0:32
    
My point exactly... – Aaron Bertrand Mar 28 '13 at 20:59
1  
@JakeHeidt, this is the downloaded data from another system, so I have no control over their database design. I wish it was stored as datetime:( – kabichan Mar 28 '13 at 20:59
up vote 7 down vote accepted

Assuming you have other values like:

 3092013 -- March 9th
10052013 -- October 5th
 1112013 -- January 11th
11012013 -- November 1st

Then you can do this:

DECLARE @x TABLE(FloatDate FLOAT);

INSERT @x VALUES
( 3092013),-- -- March 9th
(10052013),-- -- October 5th
( 1112013),-- -- January 11th
(11012013);-- -- November 1st

;WITH s(d) AS (SELECT RIGHT('0' + CONVERT(VARCHAR(32), 
  CONVERT(INT, FloatDate)), 8) FROM @x),
d(d) AS (SELECT CONVERT(DATETIME, 
  RIGHT(d,4) + LEFT(d,2) + SUBSTRING(d,3,2)) FROM s)
SELECT d FROM d;

Results:

d
-----------------------
2013-03-09 00:00:00.000
2013-10-05 00:00:00.000
2013-01-11 00:00:00.000
2013-11-01 00:00:00.000

In your example it would be:

;WITH s(d) AS (SELECT RIGHT('0' + CONVERT(VARCHAR(32), 
  CONVERT(INT, FloatDate)), 8) FROM dbo.OLDTABLE),
d(d) AS (SELECT CONVERT(DATETIME, 
  RIGHT(d,4) + LEFT(d,2) + SUBSTRING(d,3,2)) FROM s)
INSERT dbo.NEWTABLE
SELECT d FROM d;

Of course, you might have some bad data in there, even once you get the syntax right for valid values. Since you used FLOAT you don't get any inherent validation, so that column could contain -999 or 45671213 etc.

Do you find this painful? GOOD! It should be painful. You should go back to whoever decided to store dates in a FLOAT column and kick them in the shin. Ask them if they store salaries using a geography data type. I'm glad you are fixing this but those people should not be allowed anywhere near database design.

Finally, please don't do this:

CAST(anything AS CHAR)

Always specify a length. Here's why:

http://sqlblog.com/blogs/aaron_bertrand/archive/2009/10/09/bad-habits-to-kick-declaring-varchar-without-length.aspx

share|improve this answer
2  
I generally keep all of my XML data in byte encoded bigint columns, also i recommend packing up to 32 BIT columns into a INT value (saves time and space!) – Jake Heidt Mar 28 '13 at 0:50

if you have an eight digit number (float) you can just do this

select cast(cast(cast([invoice date] as int) as varchar(8)) as datetime)

share|improve this answer
    
I had the same issue with a client sending an 8-digit float for their Date. I did your suggestion, which was the easiest I've found, and it worked perfectly. Thank you. – Ronny Nov 30 '15 at 15:49
print (convert(float, CAST('1900-01-01 03:30' AS DATETIME)))--days 0,145833333333333
print (convert(float, CAST('1900-01-01 03:30' AS DATETIME))*24)--hours 3,5
print (convert(float, CAST('1900-01-01 03:30' AS DATETIME))*24*60)--minutes 210
print (convert(float, CAST('1900-01-01 03:30' AS DATETIME))*24*60*60)--seconds 12600

this second method is more clean

print (CAST(CAST('1900-01-01 03:30' AS DATETIME) AS FLOAT))--days 0,145833333333333
print (CAST(CAST('1900-01-01 03:30' AS DATETIME) AS FLOAT)*24)--hours 3,5
print (CAST(CAST('1900-01-01 03:30' AS DATETIME) AS FLOAT)*24*60)--minutes 210
print (CAST(CAST('1900-01-01 03:30' AS DATETIME) AS FLOAT)*24*60*60)--seconds 12600
share|improve this answer
    
Please consider editing your post to add more explanation about what your code does and why it will solve the problem. An answer that mostly just contains code (even if it's working) usually wont help the OP to understand their problem. – SuperBiasedMan Dec 2 '15 at 14:34

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