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So say I have the following:

[1,5,1,1,6,3,3,4,5,5,5,2,5]

Counts: {1:3, 2:1, 3:2, 4:1, 5:5, 6:1}

Now, I wanted to print a plot like a histogram that is sorted on the x axis, as in:

A traditional histogram is:

        X  
        X
X       X  
X   X   X
X X X X X X
1 2 3 4 5 6

What I would want is:

        X  
        X
      X X  
    X X X
X X X X X 
2 4 3 1 5 

My current plotting code is:

plt.clf()
plt.cla()
plt.xlim(0,1)
plt.axvline(x=.85, color='r',linewidth=0.1)
plt.hist(correlation,2000,(0.0,1.0))
plt.xlabel(index[thecolumn]+' histogram')
plt.ylabel('X Data')

savefig(histogramsave,format='pdf')

Please help me out about how I can do this... I understand I posted a similar question before, but I believe I was unclear about it....

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Histogram is not the graph you are looking for. Use the bar chart.

import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt

data = [1, 5, 1, 1, 6, 3, 3, 4, 5, 5, 5, 2, 5]
correlation = [(i, data.count(i)) for i in set(data)]
correlation.sort(key=lambda x: x[1])

labels, values = zip(*correlation)

indexes = np.arange(len(correlation))
width = 1

plt.bar(indexes, values, width)
plt.xticks(indexes + width * 0.5, labels)
plt.show()

bar chart

EDIT: For large set of data better use collections.Counter instead of the list comprehension with count.


And here is the way to archive same result much faster (without neither bar chart nor hist):

from collections import Counter
import numpy as np
import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
data = np.random.random_integers(0, 10**4, 10**5)
correlation = Counter(data).items()
correlation.sort(key=lambda x: x[1])
labels, values = zip(*correlation)
indexes = np.arange(len(correlation))

plt.plot(indexes, values)
plt.fill_between(indexes, values, 0)
plt.show()
share|improve this answer
    
Inefficient to use count here for a large list since it iterates over the list for each unique element. –  Jared Mar 28 '13 at 1:45
    
@Jared agreed. Edited the answer. Thanks for pointing that out. –  Igonato Mar 28 '13 at 2:01
    
Would this work for float values as well? –  gran_profaci Mar 28 '13 at 3:01
    
@gran_profaci yes, sure. Why it shouldn't? –  Igonato Mar 28 '13 at 3:04
    
Thing is... I have a large list of about 9000 values of correlations, hence 0<x<1.0... Now, it seems that it doesn't work for it. Is it possibly because of the width that you have given? Could you explain that please? –  gran_profaci Mar 28 '13 at 3:11

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