Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to loop through the diagonal+1 (i.e. the values 1 column to the right of the diagonal) and write the value to a column in a dataframe:

write.csv(data.frame(matrix[1,2], matrix[2,3], matrix[3,4])

How can I do this using a function, rather than just listing all the positions of the values?

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

You can index using a matrix.

eg

m <- matrix(1:25, ncol = 5)

The off diagonals can be accessed using

offd <- cbind(1:4,2:5)


m[offd]

## [1]  6 12 18 24

You could create a function that does this

offdiag <- function(m, offset){
  i <- seq_len(nrow(m)-offset)
  j <- i + offset
  m[cbind(i,j)]

}


offdiag(m, 1)
## [1]  6 12 18 24
offdiag(m, 2)
[1] 11 17 23
offdiag(m, 3)
## [1] 16 22
offdiag(m, 4)
## [1] 21
share|improve this answer
1  
This is probably faster, and should work well with sparse matrices. I think your code is clearer, but this is the code in diag for the case where its first argument is a matrix: y <- c(x)[1 + 0L:(m - 1L) * (dim(x)[1L] + 1)] –  BondedDust Mar 28 '13 at 15:03
add comment

A fast way of doing this without the head-scratching of working out the indices programatically is to use the oft-overlooked row() and col() functions. These return for each element of a matrix the row or column that element belongs to respectively.

The diagonal is where the row index of an element equals the column index. The first subdiagonal is where the row index equals the column index plus 1 whilst the first superdiagonal is where the row index equals the column index minus 1.

Here are some examples:

m <- matrix(1:25, ncol = 5)
m

> m
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5]
[1,]    1    6   11   16   21
[2,]    2    7   12   17   22
[3,]    3    8   13   18   23
[4,]    4    9   14   19   24
[5,]    5   10   15   20   25

The diagonal

m[row(m) == col(m)]
diag(m)

> m[row(m) == col(m)]
[1]  1  7 13 19 25
> diag(m) ## just to show this is correct
[1]  1  7 13 19 25

First subdiagonal

m[row(m) == col(m) + 1

> m[row(m) == col(m) + 1]
[1]  2  8 14 20

First superdiagonal

m[row(m) == col(m) -1]

> m[row(m) == col(m) -1]
[1]  6 12 18 24

Higher-order super- and subdiagonals can be extracted by increasing the value added to the column index.

Creating the data frame and writing out

Essentially you already have this, but

write.csv(data.frame(m[row(m) == col(m) + 1), file = "subdiag.csv")

A general function for sub- or superdiagonals

diags <- function(m, type = c("sub", "super"), offset = 1) {
  type <- match.arg(type)
  FUN <-
  if(isTRUE(all.equal(type, "sub")))
    `+`
  else
    `-`
  m[row(m) == FUN(col(m), offset)] 
}

In use we have:

> diags(m)
[1]  2  8 14 20
> diags(m, type = "super")
[1]  6 12 18 24
> diags(m, offset = 2)
[1]  3  9 15
share|improve this answer
    
Upvoted, `cuz that's the way I wudda dun it plus its got that kewl match.arg call, but actually think @mnel's solution is better. –  BondedDust Mar 28 '13 at 14:57
    
Thanks; would you elaborate on why you think @mnels' solution is better? –  Gavin Simpson Mar 28 '13 at 15:02
    
The use of row and col requires construction of 2 full logical matrices of the same size as the input matrix. His just builds two vectors and extracts. –  BondedDust Mar 28 '13 at 15:05
    
Right, I see what you mean - two length nrow(m) vectors vs two length prod(nrow(m), ncol(m)) vectors. So in terms of memory efficiency especially, @mnel's solution wins hands down. –  Gavin Simpson Mar 28 '13 at 15:10
    
This approach wins in flexibility. The same function can select a sub- or super-diagonal, simply by changing sign of the argument. –  Matthew Lundberg Mar 30 '13 at 2:07
add comment

Take the submatrix, then the diagonal of that.

Using mnel's m:

diag(m[, -1])
[1]  6 12 18 24

As a function with variable offset (but in this form, it is not any cleaner than mnel's solution):

offdiag <- function(m, offset) {
  s <- seq(offset)
  diag(m[,-s, drop=FALSE])
}

offdiag(m, 1)
## [1]  6 12 18 24
offdiag(m, 2)
## [1] 11 17 23
offdiag(m, 3)
## [1] 16 22
offdiag(m, 4)
## [1] 21
share|improve this answer
    
+1 Good idea, though for non-square matrices diag(m[,-1]) might be better. –  Josh O'Brien Mar 28 '13 at 4:07
    
@JoshO'Brien Yes, that is better. –  Matthew Lundberg Mar 28 '13 at 14:18
1  
Really elegant. Didn't know that about diag's capability. –  BondedDust Mar 28 '13 at 15:07
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.