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I have a code:

List<int> list = new List<int>();
for (int i = 1; i <= n; i++)
    list.Add(i);

Can I create this List<int> in one line with Linq?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted
List<int> list = Enumerable.Range(1, n).ToList();
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+1 - I see you beat Adam by 24 seconds –  JustLoren Oct 14 '09 at 16:10
List<int> list = Enumerable.Range(1, n).ToList();
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If you need a lot of those lists, you might find the following extension method useful:

public static class Helper
{
    public static List<int> To(this int start, int stop)
    {
        List<int> list = new List<int>();
        for (int i = start; i <= stop; i++) {
            list.Add(i);
        }
        return list;
    }
}

Use it like this:

var list = 1.To(5);

Of course, for the general case, the Enumerable.Range thing the others posted may be more what you want, but I thought I'd share this ;) You can use this next time your Ruby-loving co-worker says how verbose C# is with that Enumerable.Range.

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If you're defining a general-purpose extension method like this, why not make it return IEnumerable<int> rather than List<int>? The established convention for ranges pretty much everywhere is that they're lazy. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 14 '09 at 16:19
    
Because it was asked for a List<int>, not for an IEnumerable<int>. I just wrote this for this question as a general sample how this could be shortened. And to show off to your Ruby co-worker, you would want to avoid the extra ToList call ;) Now of course, if you think this method is worth being a general-purpose method, go ahead and let it return IEnumerable<int>. This should even allow you to make it into an iterator block, instead of manually creating the list. –  OregonGhost Oct 14 '09 at 16:26
    
@Pavel: Because that's exactly what Enumerable.Range does. –  Adam Robinson Oct 14 '09 at 16:46
    
@Adam: I think the point here is mainly that 1.To(10) looks cuter than Enumerable.Range(1, 10). In Ruby, IIRC, to also returns a lazy sequence rather than eagerly filled collection. –  Pavel Minaev Oct 14 '09 at 20:24

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