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In this example, I have two separate for loops. Is the running time O(num1 + num2)?

for(int i=0; i< num1 ; i++)     
{
   print i;
}

for(int i=0 ; i<num2 ; i++)
{
    print i;
}

And for this example, there is a nested for loop. Would the running time be O(num1*num2) because for each number in 0 to num1, you have to iterate from 0 to num2?

 for(int i=0 ; i<num1 ; i++)
 {
     for(int i=0 ; i<num2 ; i++)
     {  
         print i;
     }
}
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Instead of worrying about big O right away, why don't you first calculate how many numbers will be printed by each of those snippets for a couple of values for num1, num2? That should give you some intuition. –  delnan Mar 28 '13 at 2:57
    
The first example is O(n) and the second is O(n^2). Big-O notation indicates how the run time increases with the size of the input, you don't put the actual numbers in. –  Blorgbeard Mar 28 '13 at 2:59
    
First Case is Num1+Num2 Big-O =O(n) and Second Case Num1*Num2 Big-O = O(N^2) –  dekdev Mar 28 '13 at 3:24
    
You should realize that the index variable in the second example shouldn't be i in both loops.. –  Miky Dinescu Mar 28 '13 at 12:32
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1 Answer 1

You can be more general. Big-O notation isn't about finding exact values given your actual parameters. It is about determining asymptotic runtime. In this case, we can just replace num1 and num2 with n, where n is the upper bound of some interval starting at 0. Using this method, we would find the runtime of your first example to be O(n), and the second example would have a runtime O(n^2). The first example runs in linear time, and the second example is quadratic. You rarely need to go into more detail than this to categorize algorithmic runtime.

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Care to explain the down vote/improve the answer? –  kronion Mar 7 at 22:33
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