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EDIT : Okay , I think that I now get it :

Case 1:

#include <stdio.h>
#define function(_a) ((_a)*2)

int main () {
    int (*func)(int) = function(0); // function(0) = 0
    func(7);
...
}

syntax is okay , however , during run-time , main will try to access the address NULL , which will result in a software crash in windows / segmentation error in a unix environment.

Case 2:

#include <stdio.h>
#define function(_a) ((_a)*2)

int main () {
    int (*func)(int) = function;
    func(7);
...
}

compilation error , since "function" is in fact a macro , and not an actual function , therefor, a pointer to function cannot point to it , so to speak.

Case 3 (correct code ):

    #include <stdio.h>

    int function(int _a){return ((_a)*2);};

    int main () {
        int (*func)(int) = function;
        func(7);
    ...

}

Have I gotten it right this time ?

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1  
It's a function pointer that's initialized to NULL. –  Mysticial Mar 28 '13 at 3:35
    
cdecl.org –  Ed S. Mar 28 '13 at 3:44
    
okay , but what happens when calling the function , e.g , func(7) ? –  Caesar23 Mar 28 '13 at 4:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

int (*func)(int) = 0; means func is a function pointer i.e. pointer to a function and hence (*func) returning an integer i.e. first int in the statement and which takes an integer as an argument i.e. (int). Assigning int (*func)(int) to 0 means that the function pointer is assigned to point to NULL.

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Thanks for the reply , please see my comments on the first answer :) –  Caesar23 Mar 28 '13 at 4:03

This line is not what you think it is.

 int (*func)(int) = 0;

It is a variable (called func) to a pointer to a function that has the signature int somename(int) and you are setting it to 0.

For a better understanding consider this:

int myfunction(int a) { return 5;}

Then this would work

 int (*func)(int) = myfunction;
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1  
Also worth noting that after that last line of code, the function can be called using func(10); –  torak Mar 28 '13 at 3:43
    
@torak +1 for a good point. –  Ed Heal Mar 28 '13 at 3:49
    
I see ! , I was completely mistaken ! , actually , the original code was : int (*func)(int) = function (0); and function was defined thusly : #define function(_a) ((_a)*2) –  Caesar23 Mar 28 '13 at 3:58
    
but still it doesn't make sense , because function(0) returns NULL ! –  Caesar23 Mar 28 '13 at 4:01
1  
function(0) is equivalent to 0 * 2 which is 0. Isn't this your expected answer? For example, if int (*func)(int) = function where function is defined as int function(int num) { return num * 2;} and if you perform (*func)(10) you should be getting 20 –  Ganesh Mar 28 '13 at 4:09

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