Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Heres the code I've made up so far. Its fully functional and the only gripe I have with it is that my output for Weekly and Annual pay is always weekly...I'm at a loss as to how to get this from within either toString method.

public class PolyEmployees {
    public static void main(String[] args) {

    	Employee [] myEmployees = {
    		new Hourly("Joan Rivers", "Human Resources", 12.45, 34.3),
    		new Hourly("Jason Nezbit", "Accounting", 15.25, 46.0),
    		new Hourly("Ingrid Homes", "Secretary", 10.11, 38.7),
    		new Salaried("Amy Liberman", "Human Resources Executive", 32.50),
    		new Salaried("Xander Xavar", "Resource Processing", 29.20),
    		new Salaried("Milly Rockhome", "PR Executive", 65.28)
    	};

    	// Output all employee types
    	for (int i = 0; i < myEmployees.length; i++)	{
    		System.out.println("\n" + myEmployees[i].toString());
    	}		          
    }

}

/*
 * Employee abstract class
 */

abstract public class Employee {
    private String mName;
    private String mDepartment;
    protected Double mRate;

    // Constructor
    public Employee(String mName, String mDepartment, Double mRate)	{
    	this.mName = mName;
    	this.mDepartment = mDepartment;
    	this.mRate = mRate;
    }

    // Annual Pay
    public Double pay()	{	// 40 Hours a Week, 52 weeks in a year
    	return ((this.mRate * 40) * 52);
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
    	return "Employee: " + this.mName + "\nDepartment: " + this.mDepartment + "\nAnnual Pay: " + this.pay();
    }
}

/*
 * Hourly employee class
 */

public class Hourly extends Employee {
    private Double mHours;

    public Hourly(String mName, String mDepartment, Double mRate, Double mHours) {
    	super(mName, mDepartment, mRate);
    	this.mHours = mHours;
    }

    @Override
    public Double pay() {	// Weekly Pay, deals with overtime for hourly employee

    	if (this.mHours > 40.0)	{
    		return ((40 * this.mRate) + ((this.mHours-40) * (this.mRate * 1.5)));
    	}
    	else	{
    		return (this.mHours * this.mRate);
    	}		
    }

    public String toString() {
    	return super.toString() + "\tWeekly Pay: " + pay();
    }

}

/*
 * Salaried Employee Class
 */

public class Salaried extends Employee{

    public Salaried(String mName, String mDepartment, Double mRate) {
    	super(mName, mDepartment, mRate);
    }

    @Override
    public Double pay()	{	// Weekly Pay
    	return (this.mRate * 40);
    }

    @Override
    public String toString() {
    	return super.toString() + "\tWeekly Pay: " + this.pay();
    }
}

I get all the output I want except for annual pay. Stepping through the debugger it returns to the childs pay method even when calling from within the parent. Since it's overridden I am not really surprised by this, but part of my deliverable is to get weekly from the subclass and annual from the super.

So that begs my question, how can I get Annual pay from the parent? Do I have no choice but to cast it as an employee as part of my system output or is there something I am missing?

And on a side note, I love how fluid this site is. Not many places I've been to show your post live as you type it.

NOTE ON COMMENT: According to my deliverables, both the salaried and hourly employees toString must return weekly pay. The employee abstract class itself contains the method to return the annual pay.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You have the option of calling the super from the subclass. Your toString in Salaried, for example, could look like this:

return super.toString() + "\tWeekly Pay: " + this.pay()+ "\tAnnual Pay: " + super.pay());
share|improve this answer
    
Yep I feel silly for not thinking of that, this is the solution I was looking for, thank ya kindly :) –  Mohgeroth Oct 14 '09 at 16:39

Yes, calling pay() in Employee will indeed call Salaried.pay() in the context of a Salaried object. That's the point of polymorphism - that derived classes can override behaviour.

Now it strikes me that your classes would be a lot clearer if you had separate methods for getAnnualPay() and getWeeklyPay() - possibly only having getAnnualPay() in the base class, and introducing getWeeklyPay() in Salaried.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes I agree it would be clearer. Unfortuantely this is for a homework assignment, anytime I try to add more features my professor enjoys taking points away from me. Business rules for the loose :( –  Mohgeroth Oct 14 '09 at 16:41
1  
So how much was actually specified? To me, the important thing is that you understand why the overridden pay method was being called, which appeared to surprise you. –  Jon Skeet Oct 14 '09 at 16:43
    
Yes I understand it now, but initially I was surprised since I was calling pay from within the parent instead of the super. I guess that part of overriding I didn't understand until just now. Once someone posted super.pay as the way to get it from the parent, it sort of clicked. I've already been calling the super class toString from the child so I feel sort of silly for not thinking of using the same calls to get the pay. –  Mohgeroth Oct 14 '09 at 16:55

In your subclasses, you're overriding the pay() method. If you want the employees to have both an annual pay and a periodic pay, you should add abstract method periodicPay() for the subclasses to override and leave pay() as final.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.