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We are given n sets of integers of different sizes. Each set can contain duplicates also. I have to find the intersection of sets. If an element is present multiple times in all the sets, it should be added to the result.

For example, consider there are three sets {0,5,5,3,4} {5,2,3,5,6} {1,3,5,5,6}. The intersection of the given sets should be {3,5,5}

My approach is :

1.Sort the arrays.

2.Compare every element starting from the smallest array and update the count.

Is there a more efficient approach to find the intersection?

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That seems pretty close to optimal. –  Patashu Mar 28 '13 at 5:38
5  
Mathematically, sets don't contain duplicates; multisets or bags can contain duplicates. –  Jonathan Leffler Mar 28 '13 at 5:43
    
With multi-cores, perhaps a parallel insertion sort (of course your data must be sufficiently large for this to be worth it). –  kfmfe04 Mar 28 '13 at 6:05
    
{0,5,5,3,4}, {1,3,5,5,6}, and {3,5,5} aren't sets. If you're really dealing with sets, the most efficient implementation would be to use bit arrays. –  Jim Balter Mar 28 '13 at 8:06
    
"Is there a more efficient approach to find the intersection?" -- Yes indeed; see my answer. –  Jim Balter Mar 28 '13 at 8:18

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If your "sets" contain only small integers, then they can be represented by an array of counts ... e.g., {5,2,3,5,6} is

index 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
count 0 0 1 1 0 2 1

The intersection of such sets is the min of the counts:

      index 0 1 2 3 4 5 6
            -------------
{0,5,5,3,4} 1 0 0 1 1 2 0
{5,2,3,5,6} 0 0 1 1 0 2 1
{1,3,5,5,6} 0 1 0 1 0 2 1  
min         0 0 0 1 0 2 0 = {3,5,5}

If the values aren't small integers but there are few of them, just keep an array of the values -- that serves as a map between the values and the small integers, which are the indices of the array.

If there are so many values that having an array of counts for each set is too expensive, use a map from values to counts to represent each "set", together with the array of the values ... then iterate over the array to produce each value, iterating over the maps to get the counts and calculating their min. For this you would need a hash table or binary tree library to implement the maps ... or use any of the numerous more modern languages than C that provide such collection types as a matter of course.

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You can, for example, create a dictionary for each of the arrays, traverse each one adding to their counters, and adding to a "global" dictionary of if a new number is detected. Then, you select from "global" dictionary the next number (it's guaranteed to exist at least in ONE of the counter dictionaries) and then you get minimum of all the counters. Of course, if you encounter a null in a single dictionary, this number is not added to the result. Otherwise, add "minimum found" amount of "number" to the result array. With such dictionary structures, the complete complexity of the algorithm is about O(n*m) where M is maximum of your sets' sizes, and N is their quantity, while if you sort your sets, the complexity is O(n*m*log(m)) which is considerably bigger if your sets consist of more than 1000 elements each.

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I think it's not right to multiply number of the sets by the maximum set capacity, as you'll eventually add more than what is there, I'd say O(n) where n: number of elements in all sets –  Khaled A Khunaifer Mar 28 '13 at 5:41
    
@KhaledAKhunaifer We have to query each and every element in those sets in order to correctly form the result, and they are at most n*m, so we can't get O() function of less than this. M is not "set capacity", it's the maximum of what's given at the start of algorithm. A set capaciy can be as large as 2^32, with the sets themselves being of size 5 as in the example. –  Vesper Mar 28 '13 at 5:52

Here is my code, compile in C99 (don't forget to implement get,insert,remove functions first):

struct MyNode { MyNode * next; int value; int frequency; }

// returns MyNode pointer when value exist
MyNode * get(MyNode * head, int val);

// insert a new value, with frequency = 1
void insert(MyNode * head, int val);

// remove an element from the linked-list
bool remove(MyNode * head, int val);

int * intersection (int ** set, int w, int * h)
{
    MyNode * head = 0;
    MyNode * temp = 0;
    int finalSize = 0;
    int k = 0;

    for (int i=0; i<w; i++)
    {
        for (int j=0; j<h[i]; j++)
        {
            temp = get(head, set[i][j]);

            if (temp == 0)
            {
                insert(head, set[i][j]);
                finalSize++;
            }
            else
            {
                temp->frequency++;
            }
        }
    }

    temp = head;
    while (temp != 0)
    {
        if (temp->frequency != w)
        {
            temp = temp->next;
            remove(head, temp->value);
            finalSize--;
        }
        else
            temp = temp->next;
    }

    int * intersection = (int*)malloc(finalSize*sizeof(int));

    temp = head;
    while (temp != 0)
    {
        intersection[k++] = temp->data;
        temp = temp->next;
    }

    return intersection;
}
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The only optimization I would suggest to your solution would be to convert your arrays (they are not really sets because they have duplicates) to key-value dictionaries so that the key would be the element of an array and the value would be the number of occurences. For your test example: {0,5,5,3,4} {5,2,3,5,6} {1,3,5,5,6} the dictionaries would look like that

{0->1, 3-<1, 4->1, 5->2}
{2->1, 3->1, 5->2, 6->1}
{1->1, 3->1, 5->2, 6->1}

Then you compare pairs of dictionaries starting from the smallest dictionary and if the element occurs in both - you take the smaller number of occurences. This optimization will save time required to deal with duplicates.

The resulting dictionary would be: {3->1, 5->2} - you could convert it back to an array.

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