Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

So my function integrates a polynomial in decreasing order.

For example, 3X^3-2x+1 = [3 0 2 1]

There are limitations, of course but this is just for practice.

My integral keeps on coming back as -1, or incorrect, unless I input a 0 array.

This brings me to another problem, when entering the first few numbers, if I type a non-number, it gets stuck in my goto loop. I know I should not use these, please show me how to not use it.

Here is my code:

#include <iostream>
#include "eval.h"
int main ()
{
        using namespace std;              // yes i know using std:: is better... but I got lazy


        cout<<"This program takes the coefficients of a polinomial in decreasing \n "
                "degree. For example, x^2-1 = [1 0 -1] \n";
                                          // explains to the user what the function does, and         how to use it

        int columns;
            cout<<"Enter The highest degree plus one \n ";  // in other words, how many elements     the array will have
            cin>> columns;
            cout<<"Enter Your Coefficients\n ";

        float myMatrix[columns];                            //This was a code for practice, so I     decided to use for loops to get user input

                for (int i = 1; i<columns+1; ++i)
                {
                    cin>>myMatrix[i];
                }
                                                            //Im well aware i could have used other things
        float skeletonMatrix[columns+1];

                for (int ii = 1; ii< columns+8;++ii)        //for loop that injects user array into a skeleton matrix which is one element bigger beacuse of +C
                {
                    skeletonMatrix[ii] = (myMatrix[ii]/(columns+1-ii));
                }

            cout<<"The Integral is"<<endl;
                for (int iii = 1; iii<columns+1; ++iii)
                {
                        if (skeletonMatrix[iii] == 0 )
                        {
                            continue;
                        }
                    cout<<skeletonMatrix[iii]<<"x^"<<columns+1-iii<<" + ";
                }
            cout<<"C"<<endl;                                // Obviously I have not added the +C element because I will do that at another point, for a different purpose

            cout<<"Do you wish to Evaluate the Integral??? \n ";
            cout<<"Y of yes, N for no";
        char chYorN;
tryagain:
            cin>>chYorN;
        double dScalara;
        double dScalarb;
        double integral;
                switch(chYorN)
                {

                    case 'y':
                        {
                            cout<<"Enter where you want the integral \n to be evaluated"<<endl;
                            cout<<"e.g. from a to b would be a, then b"<<endl;
                            cin>>dScalara;
                            cin>>dScalarb;
                            integral = (eval(columns , dScalarb , myMatrix) - eval(columns , dScalara , myMatrix));
                            cout<<"The integral is"<< integral <<endl;
                        break;
                        }


                    case 'n':
                        {
                            cout<<"Thank you for using my program"<<endl;
                        break;
                        }

                    default:                                // At the matrix input, input a non number, and the program will go to this for some reason
                        {
                            cout<<"Try again Brah";
                        goto tryagain;                      // <-----im afraid it has to do with this, please show me how to replace this
                        }
                }

    return 0;
}

My Eval.h is as follows:

#ifndef EVAL_H
#define EVAL_H
#include <math.h>

double eval(int columns, double dScalar, float myMatrix[])
{
    double dSum;
            for (int i=0; i<columns ; ++i)
            {
                myMatrix[columns-i]= myMatrix[columns-i]*(pow(dScalar,(double)i)); //evaluates a     function at dScalar
            }

            for (int ii=1; ii<columns+1;++ii)                                      // sums up the different parts
            {
                dSum+=myMatrix[ii];
            }

    return dSum;
}
#endif

If there is another way of showing my array please let me know. I wish I could show it in a row, and not a column.

Also a 2d array as well. I would like for it to show up like this:

1 0 2 2 0

0 1 2 3 0

0 0 0 0 1

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by user93353, Shai, Frank van Puffelen, eandersson, Firoze Lafeer Apr 7 '13 at 12:12

This question is unlikely to help any future visitors; it is only relevant to a small geographic area, a specific moment in time, or an extraordinarily narrow situation that is not generally applicable to the worldwide audience of the internet. For help making this question more broadly applicable, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

2  
Instead of a goto, use a while() loop. Have you tried debugging your code, comparing it to what you expect should happen at each step and figuring out where the algorithm in your head and the algorithm you've written diverge? –  Patashu Mar 28 '13 at 5:48
    
have you tried debugging? pow may not be the right function... –  V-X Mar 28 '13 at 5:52
    
There seems to be about 3 questions here. Please limit your posts to one specific problem. If you have more problems, make more posts. –  Benjamin Lindley Mar 28 '13 at 5:53

2 Answers 2

One possible reason for the error might be that your goto statement puts the control before a variable declaration. Instead of this :

tryagain:
    cin>>chYorN;
    double dScalara;
    double dScalarb;
    double integral;
            switch(chYorN)
            {

Try this one :

double dScalara;
double dScalarb;
double integral;
tryagain:
    cin>>chYorN;
    switch(chYorN)
     {

And also, please take into consideration that array indices start from zero. If you have int a[3], it will be stored as a[0], a[1], a[2] and not as a[1], a[2], a[3]. (There's an answer about this one by @Ed Heal as I'm typing this. So, I'll not elaborate much).

Hope this helped.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes they start at 0, but I accounted for that everywhere, so it all starts at 1. I'll fix it later and do a shift by one –  user2218412 Mar 28 '13 at 16:25

You access to the various arrays are incorrect.

For example this code:

    float myMatrix[columns];
    for (int i = 1; i<columns+1; ++i)
            {
                cin>>myMatrix[i];
            }

Should be

    float myMatrix[columns];

            for (int i = 0; i<columns; ++i)
            {
                cin>>myMatrix[i];
            }

As the index into arrays start at 0 so the final index will be columns-1.

You have similar problems in the various other arrays.

This error will lead to undefined errors.

share|improve this answer
    
I remember at first I had it like this, but somewhere inside the loop I was dividing by 0. I'll look into it again when I get home. –  user2218412 Mar 28 '13 at 16:28

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.