Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

This question already has an answer here:

I just wanted to know the reasoning for the line for(;;) in the following code.

//
// blocking_tcp_echo_server.cpp
// ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
//
// Copyright (c) 2003-2012 Christopher M. Kohlhoff (chris at kohlhoff dot com)
//
// Distributed under the Boost Software License, Version 1.0. (See accompanying
// file LICENSE_1_0.txt or copy at http://www.boost.org/LICENSE_1_0.txt)
//

#include <cstdlib>
#include <iostream>
#include <boost/bind.hpp>
#include <boost/smart_ptr.hpp>
#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <boost/thread/thread.hpp>

using boost::asio::ip::tcp;

const int max_length = 1024;

typedef boost::shared_ptr<tcp::socket> socket_ptr;

void session(socket_ptr sock)
{
  try
  {
    for (;;)
    {
      char data[max_length];

      boost::system::error_code error;
      size_t length = sock->read_some(boost::asio::buffer(data), error);
      if (error == boost::asio::error::eof)
        break; // Connection closed cleanly by peer.
      else if (error)
        throw boost::system::system_error(error); // Some other error.

      boost::asio::write(*sock, boost::asio::buffer(data, length));
    }
  }
  catch (std::exception& e)
  {
    std::cerr << "Exception in thread: " << e.what() << "\n";
  }
}

void server(boost::asio::io_service& io_service, short port)
{
  tcp::acceptor a(io_service, tcp::endpoint(tcp::v4(), port));
  for (;;)
  {
    socket_ptr sock(new tcp::socket(io_service));
    a.accept(*sock);
    boost::thread t(boost::bind(session, sock));
  }
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
  try
  {
    if (argc != 2)
    {
      std::cerr << "Usage: blocking_tcp_echo_server <port>\n";
      return 1;
    }

    boost::asio::io_service io_service;

    using namespace std; // For atoi.
    server(io_service, atoi(argv[1]));
  }
  catch (std::exception& e)
  {
    std::cerr << "Exception: " << e.what() << "\n";
  }

  return 0;
}
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by DarenW, Ja͢ck, M M., Blastfurnace, EdChum Mar 28 '13 at 9:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

2  
It's the for-ever loop. –  Mysticial Mar 28 '13 at 6:30
    
Because your program wants to continuously and infintely(unless an error occurs) accept the requests/connections available on socket and process them. The infinite loop is provided by for(;;;) while the condition to break from this loop is if error occurs during socket communication. –  Alok Save Mar 28 '13 at 6:33
    
Relevant question on different ways to express forever loops: stackoverflow.com/q/224138/10468 –  DarenW Mar 28 '13 at 6:36
    
@DarenW I tried using Google for for(;;) and it didn't show up, neither was it a suggestion when I made the thread. –  lost_with_coding Mar 28 '13 at 7:14

5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The for loop in question,

for (;;)
{
  char data[max_length];
  boost::system::error_code error;
  size_t length = sock->read_some(boost::asio::buffer(data), error);
  if (error == boost::asio::error::eof)
    break; // Connection closed cleanly by peer.
  else if (error)
    throw boost::system::system_error(error); // Some other error.
  boost::asio::write(*sock, boost::asio::buffer(data, length));
}

implements a loop with normal exit in the middle.

This is known as a loop-and-a-half.

Using for(;;) instead of while(true) one avoids silly-warnings with a least one compiler, namely Visual C++. It's also more idiomatic. If the while loop was meant to play such a role, then it would have a default condition (as the for loop has).

One way to rewrite such a loop to avoid the exit in the middle is to make the second part of the loop body conditional, like this:

for ( bool finished = false; !finished;)
{
  char data[max_length];
  boost::system::error_code error;
  size_t length = sock->read_some(boost::asio::buffer(data), error);
  if (error == boost::asio::error::eof)
    finished = true; // Connection closed cleanly by peer.
  else
  {
    if (error)
      throw boost::system::system_error(error); // Some other error.
    boost::asio::write(*sock, boost::asio::buffer(data, length));
  }
}

Another way to express it, but with rather ungood code redundancy, is to repeat the upper half of the loop before the loop, half unrolling the loop, like this:

char data[max_length];
boost::system::error_code error;
size_t length = sock->read_some(boost::asio::buffer(data), error);
for (; error != boost::asio::error::eof; )
{
  if (error)
    throw boost::system::system_error(error); // Some other error.

  boost::asio::write(*sock, boost::asio::buffer(data, length));
  size_t length = sock->read_some(boost::asio::buffer(data), error);
}

With respect to expressing the loop, I prefer the code as originally expressed, with exit in the middle.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for solution without for(;;). Every endless loop with exit statement can be converted to normal loop. –  Spook Mar 28 '13 at 6:52

It's like a for loop with nothing for all 3 expressions. It is equivalent to:

while(true) { ... }

I just wanted to know the reasoning

In this case, the code author wanted a specified block of code to run "forever" until he told it not to run (by explicitly exiting using break, return, throw, etc.)

share|improve this answer

Loop forever , so you need to have break or return to exit the loop.

share|improve this answer

The purpose of for (;;) it to run forever. It's equivalent to while (true). It will need one of the following condition to break:

  • the use of break, specifically intended to to break a loop's execution
  • the use of return in a function context
  • the use of throw to throw an exception
  • the use of goto
share|improve this answer
    
-1 the equivalent code would not compile, and if fixed to compile, would not be equivalent. –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Mar 28 '13 at 6:37
    
@Cheersandhth.-Alf, you are right: the last statement would be executed in my case even if the condition is met. Deleted. –  Jefffrey Mar 28 '13 at 6:40
    
ok, fixed, removed dowvote –  Cheers and hth. - Alf Mar 28 '13 at 7:10

ISO/IEC 14882:2003 states the structure of a for loop in section 6.5.3 paragraph 1:

for ( for-init-statement condition_opt ; expression_opt ) statement

And in paragraph 2 it says:

Either or both of the condition and the expression can be omitted. A missing condition makes the implied while clause equivalent to while(true).

share|improve this answer
    
also note that there are many many possible duplicates on stackoverflow stackoverflow.com/questions/8285228/what-does-for-mean?lq=1 –  nurettin Mar 28 '13 at 7:01

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.