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Also using assertion libraries with methods devoted to comparing list, I'm unable to match this two results in unit tests:

var list1 = new List<Tuple<string, IEnumerable<string>>>
{
  Tuple.Create<string,IEnumerable<string>>("string", new[] { "value" })
};

var list2 = new List<Tuple<string, IEnumerable<string>>>
{
  Tuple.Create<string,IEnumerable<string>>("string", new[] { "value" })
};


var result = list1.All(a => list2.Any(a.Equals)); // result false

The only way to get a positive match is decomposing the tuple and matching Item2 with a method that supports comparison of lists.

There's a way without doing it?

share|improve this question
    
You can create your own class with overriden equals, then you could use result = list1.SequenceEqual(list2); – Dmitry Dovgopoly Mar 28 '13 at 6:52
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can use SequenceEqual extension method:

var result = list1.All(a => list2.Any(x => x.Item1 == a.Item1 && x.Item2.SequenceEqual(a.Item2)));

Returns true for your sample input.

The reason why you have to do it explicitly and it's not working by default when two Tuple<string, IEnumerable<string>> instances are compared is the second Tuple item. According to MSDN both components are checked agains each other to decide if Tuples are equal. Because the second one is an Array standard reference equality comparer is used. And because your Tuples are not pointing to the same Array in memory it returns false.

Stardard .Any(a.Equals) would work if only your Tuple objects were pointing to the same array:

var array = new[] { "value" };

var list1 = new List<Tuple<string, IEnumerable<string>>>
{
    Tuple.Create<string,IEnumerable<string>>("string", array)
};

var list2 = new List<Tuple<string, IEnumerable<string>>>
{
    Tuple.Create<string,IEnumerable<string>>("string", array)
};

var result = list1.All(a => list2.Any(a.Equals));

Returns true as well.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 this works and allow a terse syntax. Also if it decompose tuples, it's ok for me; because it enough synthetic to fit in an Assert.True. – jay Mar 28 '13 at 6:53
    
yes I'm agree: this is the reason. I was just wondering if someone wrote some unit test method that cover the case... – jay Mar 28 '13 at 6:56

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