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I'm using the webapp2 micro framework as described in the webapp2 guide (http://webapp-improved.appspot.com/guide/handlers.html):

import webapp2

class WSGIApplication(webapp2.WSGIApplication):
    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(WSGIApplication, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.router.set_dispatcher(self.__class__.custom_dispatcher)

    @staticmethod
    def custom_dispatcher(router, request, response):
        rv = router.default_dispatcher(request, response)
        if isinstance(rv, basestring):
            rv = webapp2.Response(rv)
        elif isinstance(rv, tuple):
            rv = webapp2.Response(*rv)
        return rv

    def route(self, *args, **kwargs):
        def wrapper(func):
            self.router.add(webapp2.Route(handler=func, *args, **kwargs))
            return func
        return wrapper

And I then define my view functions:

import micro_webapp2

app = micro_webapp2.WSGIApplication()

@app.route('/')
def hello_handler(request, *args, **kwargs):
    return 'Hello, world!'

Instead I want to render templates, invoke redirects and work with the webapp2 sessions extension.

How should I do that when using the webapp2 micro framework?

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3 Answers 3

RE: Templates

It looks as if webapp2 doesn't come with a built-in templating engine. However, there are plenty of very high quality templating systems for Python. Some of the most popular include jinja2, django-templates, and Pystache.

If you're planning on deploying to google app engine, you may want to choose Django templates or Jinja2, as they are both supported out of the box:

I recommend jinja2, as it's simple to get going, has really good documentation, and works really well (although I've used django and Pystache before, both are great).

Jinja2 has a getting started guide which should help you get going quickly. Once you have Jinja2 installed, using it should simply be a matter of making an appropriate 'templates' dir with a template in it. Say 'hello.html':

<!doctype html>
<html><head><title>Hello {{ who }}</title></head>
<body><h1>Hello {{ who }}</h1></body>
</html>

and making your views look something like:

import micro_webapp2
from jinja2 import Environment, PackageLoader

app = micro_webapp2.WSGIApplication()
env = Environment(loader=PackageLoader('my_application_name', 'templates'))

@app.route('/')
def hello_handler(request, *args, **kwargs):
    template = env.get_template('hello.html')
    return template.render(who='world')

I hope this is helpful,

Dan

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I'm now using this micro framework:

import webapp2

from webapp2_extras import jinja2, routes, sessions

class WSGIApplication(webapp2.WSGIApplication):

    def __init__(self, *args, **kwargs):
        super(WSGIApplication, self).__init__(*args, **kwargs)
        self.router.set_dispatcher(self.__class__.custom_dispatcher)

    @staticmethod
    def custom_dispatcher(router, request, response):
        rv = router.default_dispatcher(request, response)
        router.session_store = sessions.get_store(request=request)
        if isinstance(rv, basestring):
            rv = webapp2.Response(rv)
        elif isinstance(rv, tuple):
            rv = webapp2.Response(*rv)
        router.session_store.save_sessions(rv)
        return rv

    def route(self, *args, **kwargs):
        def wrapper(func):
            self.router.add(routes.RedirectRoute(handler=func, strict_slash=True, *args, **kwargs))
            return func
        return wrapper

    def jinja2_factory(self, app):
        j = jinja2.Jinja2(app)
        j.environment.globals.update({
            'config': app.config,
            'uri_for': webapp2.uri_for
        })
        return j

    @webapp2.cached_property
    def jinja2(self):
        return jinja2.get_jinja2(factory=self.jinja2_factory, app=self)

    def session_store(self):
        return sessions.get_store(request=self.request)

    def session(self):
        return self.session_store().get_session()

    def add_flash(self, value, level=None):
        self.session().add_flash(value, level=level)

    def redirect_to(self, _name, *args, **kwargs):
        return webapp2.redirect_to(_name, *args, **kwargs)

    def render_template(self, _filename, **context):
        session = self.session()
        ctx = {
            'flashes': session.get_flashes(),
            'session': session
        }
        ctx.update(context)
        rv = self.jinja2.render_template(_filename, **ctx)
        return rv

It adds convenient methods to the app instance. Which makes it possible to something like:

@app.route('/book/list', methods=['GET'], name='book_list')
def book_list(request):
    return app.render_template('book/list.html', books=[])

@app.route('/book/create', methods=['GET'], name='book_create')
def book_create(request):
    app.add_flash('Create book not yet implemented!', level='warning')
    return app.redirect_to('book_list')

It's based on code I found on https://github.com/commonsense/CommonConsensus/blob/master/server/webapp2_flask.py

Any comments on this approach are welcome!

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A redirect is the same as the normal webapp2 way:

@app.route('/')
def hello_handler(request, *args, **kwargs):
    return webapp2.redirect('/another_url')

As for templates, well you just return the string you get when you render a template as the result.

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