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I am new to programming, and was trying to solve this problem on Project Euler using basic Python.

Essentially, I tried to use recursion based on the largest value chosen at every stage, and using a list to maintain possible options for future choices.

The code is short and is given below:

def func(n,l):
    if n<0:
        return 0
    if l==[1] or n==0:
        return 1
    else:
        j=0
        while l != []:
            j=j+func(n-l[0],l) 
            del l[0]
        return j

print func(200,[200,100,50,20,10,5,2,1])

For instance, if we have

func(5,[5,2,1])

the recursion splits it into

func(0,[5,2,1]) + func(3,[2,1]) + func(4,[1])  

But the code never seems to go through. Either it says that there is a list-index-out-of-range error, or a maximum-recursion-depth error (even for very small toy instances). I am unable to find the mistake. Any help will be much appreciated.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In Python lists are passed into functions by reference, but not by value. The simplest fix for your program is changing recursive call to func(n - l[0], l[:]). In this way list will be passed by value.

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Thanks! That did set everything right. –  BharatRam Mar 28 '13 at 8:16

One thing you're failing to take into account is that the following:

j=j+func(n-l[0],l) 

doesn't make a copy of l.

Therefore all recursive invocations of func operate on the same list. When the innermost invocation deletes the last element of l and returns, its caller will attempt to del l[0] and will get an IndexError.

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I understand the problem now. Thanks! –  BharatRam Mar 28 '13 at 8:17

At each recursion, make the following 2 decisions:

  1. Take the first coin (say f) from available coin types, then check if we can made (n-f) from those coins. This results in a sub-problem func(n - f, l)
  2. Ignore the first coin type, and check if we can make n from the remaining coin types. This results in a sub-problem func(n, l[1:])

The total number of combinations should be the sum of the two sub-problems. So the code goes:

def func(n, l):
    if n == 0:
        return 1
    if n < 0 or len(l) == 0:
        return 0
    if l == [1] or n == 0:
        return 1

    return func(n - l[0], l) + func(n, l[1:])

Each recursion a copy of l is made by l[1:]. This can be omitted by pop element before next recursion and restore with append afterwards.

def func(n, l):
    if n == 0:
        return 1
    if n < 0 or len(l) == 0:
        return 0
    if l == [1] or n == 0:
        return 1

    full = func(n - l[-1], l)
    last = l.pop()
    partial = func(n, l)
    l.append(last)
    return full + partial
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I had used the same method as you suggested above, but the error arose from referring to the list, as was pointed out. The simple fix suggested in the previous answer (namely replacing j=j+func(n-l[0],l) with j=j+func(n-l[0],l[:]) resolved the problem. But thanks for your solution too! –  BharatRam Mar 28 '13 at 8:34

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