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I'm trying to move some code into a shared library (works fine when compiled stand-alone) but getting some issues with class inline functions. mingw/gcc v4.7.2.

Part of the problem appears to be because I prefer to define my inline functions outside the class declaration (it keeps the class declaration neater and easier to read). I always thought this was acceptable and equivalent to defining within the class declaration ... but that doesn't appear to always be the case. I've created a simple sample to demonstrate the problems. (Obviously the dllexport would normally be in a macro to switch between import/export.)

Header:

// Uncomment one at a time to see how it compiles with: -O2 -Winline
//#define INLINE_OPTION 1 // implicit - builds without inline warnings
#define INLINE_OPTION 2 // simple external inline - gives inline warnings
//#define INLINE_OPTION 3 // external forced inline - gives inline errors

class __attribute__((dllexport)) Dummy {
public:
    Dummy() : m_int{0} {}
    ~Dummy() {}
    #if INLINE_OPTION == 1
    int get_int() const { return m_int; }
    #else
    int get_int() const;
    #endif
    int do_something();
private:
    int m_int;
};

#if INLINE_OPTION == 2
inline int Dummy::get_int() const
{ return m_int; }
#endif

#if INLINE_OPTION == 3
inline __attribute__((always_inline)) int Dummy::get_int() const
{ return m_int; }
#endif

.cpp file:

int Dummy::do_something()
{
    int i = get_int();
    i *= 2;
    return i;
}

As noted above, with INLINE_OPTION == 1 (implicit, in-class inline definition) the code compiles with out warning.

With INLINE_OPTION == 2 (out-of-class inline definition) I get this warning: int Dummy::get_int() const' can never be inlined because it uses attributes conflicting with inlining [-Winline]

With INLINE_OPTION == 3 (trying to force inline), I get the same warning as above, AND I get this error: error: inlining failed in call to always_inline 'int Dummy::get_int() const': function not inlinable, with the information about it being called from the first line inside Dummy::do_something() in the .cpp file. Notice this is about trying to inline the function within the library itself! For simple accessor functions this could be very a very significant overhead.

Am I doing something wrong? Is it gcc right in treating the out-of-class-definition inline function differently to in-class function definitions? (Am I really forced to clutter the class declaration?)

Note: The problem doesn't just effect things that I declare inline. It also effects anything declared as constexpr and even destructors declared as "= default" when inheritance is involved.

Edit:

Just tried with mingw64 / gcc v4.8.0 with the same results. Note that this includes the fact that option 1 does NOT inline in do_something (I checked the assembler output), so apparently the only difference between option 1 and option 2 is that only option 2 will gives the -Winline warning.

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What does __attribute__((dllexport)) do? Is it really necessary? It seems that this attribute prevents inlining. Do you get the same problem on linux or OSX? –  Walter Mar 28 '13 at 11:45
    
That's part of creating a shared library (dll) under windows. It may have been less confusing if I'd used __declspec(dllexport) which is a synonym for that attribute - sorry. It is definitely the culprit, but then the whole point is that I'm trying to move the code to a shared library. I'm not currently set up to compile under Linux (and never have been for OSX). As I understand it the modern equivalent under Linux would __attribute__((visibility("default"))). –  GeoffW Mar 28 '13 at 12:02
    
Hmm. I create shared libraries under linux & OSX simply by g++ -shared -o library.so obj1.o obj2.o with obj1.o etc made w/o any __attribute__ settings in the sources. anything that is not in an anonymous namespace is visible, but typical user programs only use stuff declared in related headers. –  Walter Mar 28 '13 at 15:48
    
Though you can use visibility to change from the "default" if you want. Windows has always needed explicit export/import in its shared libraries (the alternative, manual .def file isn't very practical for C++). –  GeoffW Mar 29 '13 at 0:38
    
If this is so (windows sucks), then can you not simply use the attribute required for export only on the symbols to be exported, i.e. not on the whole class, but only on the members you want in the dll? One way would be to split the class into two: base and derived, where the derived has only inline members and is not exported. –  Walter Mar 29 '13 at 12:39

5 Answers 5

I don't know nothing about how to make shared libraries on Windows. In linux/OSX no special treatment is required in the source code, so that both shared (.so) and ordinary (.a) libraries can be made from the same sources without special treatment.

If you really do need a special attribute for symbols to be exported into shared libraries, then you may simply split the code, e.g.

namespace implementation_details {
  class __attribute__((dllexport)) DummyBase
  {
  protected:
    DummyBase() : m_int{0} {}
    ~DummyBase() {}
    int do_something();
    int m_int;
  };
}

struct Dummy: private implementation_details::DummyBase
{
  using implementation_details::DummyBase::do_something;
  int get_int() const noexcept;
};

inline __attribute__((always_inline)) int Dummy::get_int() const noexcept
{ return m_int; }
share|improve this answer
    
Interesting idea, Walter (and with appropriate adjustments compiles without warning or internal inlining problem), but it doesn't achieve the needed result. Dummy is the one that needs exporting - not the implementation_details::DummyBase - and that case we come back to the inline problem. So far the only solution/work-around is buried in the comments from @everclear - put the export only on the members I want to export (not the inlines). –  GeoffW Mar 29 '13 at 13:12
    
What is the reason that you must export Dummy? Is not all what matters the functionality? Btw, I also suggested to put the attribute on selected members only in my comments. (what adjustments were necessary?) –  Walter Mar 29 '13 at 13:45
    
Thinking this over again I think you're probably right, this probably would work ... though I don't fancy migrating all my code in this manner. And, yes, the attributes on selected members looks like a viable work around - not pretty (though prettier than the above ;) ), but workable. –  GeoffW Mar 29 '13 at 13:50

The compiler cannot inline a function which has to be exported in a dll. After all when called from executable linked with your dll the function should have an address. Most probably the call from do_something will be inlined but in the general case i think it's just impossible

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Take another look at the sample. Choosing option 1 (in-class inline definition) raises no complaints. So either it is not inlining in the internal code and not complaining about it, or it is managing to do what was expected there but not in option 2 (and I thought 1 and 2 should be identical in their effect). I have tried to play with -fkeep-inline-functions and also visibility attributes but none of them seem to help. –  GeoffW Mar 29 '13 at 0:29
    
I just checked this too. Option 1 may not be complaining but it is NOT inlining inside do_something either. The assembly definitely shows a call to get_int. Consider what this means for a supposedly optimised shared library - all those simple accessor functions we thought were being inlined have become function calls! –  GeoffW Mar 29 '13 at 1:36
    
Considering the number of other posts I see on here that make the same mistake about not inlining exported functions, it seems worth adding this link to show how MSVC does it. And gcc is also capable of having both the addressable function symbol and still be able to inline (see the -fkeep-inline-functions option), it also has an option -fvisibility-inlines-hidden so you can avoid the overheads of exporting function symbols that won't be directly used (which regrettably doesn't solve the problem above). –  GeoffW Mar 29 '13 at 4:52
    
I think you are mistaking what it means to call an inlined function. The references to MSVC and gcc options allow for the actual assembler definition of a function within a dll/so to be emitted, even though all calls within the dll/so itself have been inlined. In other words, even though the dll/so doesnt need the definition (due to inlining) the function is emitted anyway. Calls to that function originating outside the dll/so use that definition. –  Todd Freed Nov 30 '13 at 22:08

Ok maybe my answer was a little cryptic... let me give you a quick example of what I mean using your code snippets.

dummy.h:

#ifndef _DUMMY_H_
#define _DUMMY_H_

class __attribute__((dllexport)) Dummy {
public:
  Dummy() : m_int{0} {}
  ~Dummy() {}
  int get_int() const;
  int do_something();
private:
  int m_int;
};

// here goes the include of the implementation header file
#include "dummy.h.impl"
#endif // _DUMMY_H_

dummy.h.impl:

// there will be no symbol for Dummy::get_int() in the dll.
// Only its contents are copied to the places where it
// is used. Placing this in the header gives other binaries
// you build with this lib the chance to do the same.
inline int Dummy::get_int() const
{ return m_int; }

Of course you could place the inline definitions just below your class declaration in the same header file. However, I find this still violates the separation of declaration and definition.

dummy.cpp:

// this method will become a symbol in the library because 
// it is a C++ source file.
int Dummy::do_something()
{
  // i would if i knew what to do...
  return 0;
}

Hope I could be of help.

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This sounds like it could be interesting, but I don't understand exactly what you mean. Could you elaborate a bit more? (In my real code the out-of-class inline definitions are already in a separate header file - it's convenient when experimenting with the effects of inlining.) –  GeoffW Mar 29 '13 at 0:47
    
I just tried, and even when I only include the out-of-class definitions in the .cpp file (not in the class header), I still get the warnings about "can never be inlined". And yet this technique usually works when not using dllexport. –  GeoffW Mar 29 '13 at 1:10
    
Thanks for the clarification (and taking the time to answer). That is what my real code does (the OP sample kept the two header parts together to keep it simpler). But I don't see that it really anything. dummy.h.impl is still part of dummy.h. (Note that even moving the dummy.h.impl include to the .cpp file results in the warnings and problems I was describing.) –  GeoffW Mar 29 '13 at 7:32
    
Ok I just put this (including your do_something() implementation) into Dev-C++ MinGW (3.4.2). The code compiles just fine in all of your configurations and also for my example from above. I feel this is a problem of the class attribute (dllexport) being applied to all class members (including get_int()). In VC++ you can apply the __declspec(dllexport) to selected members. You must not export get_int() because by specifying it as inline you declare that you do not wish a symbol for that method. GCC also does not create a symbol for get_int() for any of the code configurations above. –  everclear Mar 29 '13 at 12:24
    
I was given the same advice over in the mingw64 support forum a while ago, and I was just confirming that both msvc and gcc will accept __declspec(dllexport) on specific member functions rather than the entire class. And they do. It's going to be horribly messy on real code. What's curious is that hiding the inline member from export didn't work (in gcc), whereas selecting selecting just do_something does work. Of course msvc is happy in either cas, but I want to use gcc for its c++11 support. –  GeoffW Mar 29 '13 at 12:42

Why don't you declare your function inline in class declaration (inline int get_int() const;)? Maybe error is there?

share|improve this answer
    
It makes no difference (but thanks for the thought). I've never bothered with inline in the class declaration because it doesn't seem to matter to any of the compilers I've used, and as far as I know it is not supposed to be necessary. –  GeoffW Mar 28 '13 at 10:57
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The edit I did on another post didn't seem to take, and anyway it seems some additional clarity may be appropriate, so I am posting details I've sent to another forum. In the code below class C is the work around to this problem - export only the non-inline members, not the whole class. As noted in the comments elsewhere, __declspec(dllexport) and __attribute__((dllexport)) are equivalent.

test.hpp

class __declspec(dllexport) A {
public:
    int fa() { return m; }
    int ga();
private:
    int m{0};
};

class __declspec(dllexport) B {
public:
    int fb();
    int gb();
private:
    int m{0};
};
inline int B::fb() { return m; }

class C {
public:
    int fc() { return m; }
    __declspec(dllexport) int gc();
private:
    int m{0};
};

test.cpp

#include "test.hpp"

int A::ga() { return (fa() + 1); }

int B::gb() { return (fb() + 1); }

int C::gc() { return (fc() + 1); }

If you compile this with options: -std=c++11 -O2 -S -Winline (using mingw/ming64 with gcc v4.7.2 or v4.8.0) you can see the assembler produced for the library functions ga, gb and gc look like this:

ga:

subq    $40, %rsp
.seh_stackalloc 40
.seh_endprologue
call    _ZN1A2faEv
addl    $1, %eax
addq    $40, %rsp
ret

gb:

subq    $40, %rsp
.seh_stackalloc 40
.seh_endprologue
call    _ZN1B2fbEv
addl    $1, %eax
addq    $40, %rsp
ret

gc:

.seh_endprologue
movl    (%rcx), %eax
addl    $1, %eax
ret

and you get the warnings:
warning: function 'int B::fb()' can never be inlined because it uses attributes conflicting with inlining [-Winline]
warning: inlining failed in call to 'int B::fb()': function not inlinable [-Winline] (called from B::gb())

Notice that there were no warnings about fa not inlining (which is, I think, expected). But also notice that ga, gb and gc are all library functions. Whatever you may think about whether the inline functions themselves should be exported, there is no good reason why the inlines cannot be inlined inside the library. Hence I consider this a bug in the compiler.

Take a look around at well regarded code and see how much you find that exports only explicit members. For example those few parts of boost that get compiled into a library (eg: regex), use the class A technique, which means the many accessor functions are not being inlined inside the library.

But, all that aside, the answer for now is the class C technique (obviously in real code this has to be enclosed in a macro to switch between export and import as you would normally at the class level).

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