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How I can rewrite this query without subquery??

select i.invoice_number, i.invoice_total 
  from invoices i 
 where i.invoice_total>(select avg(payment_total) 
                          from invoices);
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closed as not a real question by APC, joran, spajce, lschin, p.s.w.g Mar 29 '13 at 5:02

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

a variant for you..using only one select on 10g+ and without a cartesian self join :)

SQL> select avg(payment_total)
  2    from invoices;

AVG(PAYMENT_TOTAL)
------------------
               5.4

SQL> select invoice_number, invoice_total, payment_total
  2    from invoices
  3  model return updated rows
  4  dimension by (row_number() over (order by 1) rn,
  5                case when invoice_total > avg(payment_total) over () then 1 else 2 end a)
  6  measures (invoice_total, invoice_number, payment_total)
  7  rules  (
  8     invoice_number[any, 1] = invoice_number[cv(rn), 1]
  9  )
 10   order by 1;

INVOICE_NUMBER INVOICE_TOTAL PAYMENT_TOTAL
-------------- ------------- -------------
             6             6             1
             7             7             8
             8             8             4
             9             9             7
            10            10             6

"return updated rows" .. we only return rows that we touched. We mark each row as to whether it exceeded the average with case when invoice_total > avg(payment_total) over () then 1 else 2 end a. I.e. those rows over average have a set to 1. then we just tickle the rows with 1 by invoice_number[any, 1] = invoice_number[cv(rn), 1] (ie don't change any data..just update it to itself).

compared to your original query:

SQL> select i.invoice_number, i.invoice_total , i.payment_total
  2    from invoices i
  3   where i.invoice_total>(select avg(payment_total)
  4                            from invoices)
  5   order by 1;

INVOICE_NUMBER INVOICE_TOTAL PAYMENT_TOTAL
-------------- ------------- -------------
             6             6             1
             7             7             8
             8             8             4
             9             9             7
            10            10             6
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Thank you!! Its what i was looking for! –  Yuliya Sokhrannaya Mar 29 '13 at 8:56

Only one SELECT :-)

select i1.invoice_number, i1.invoice_total 
from invoices i1, invoices i2 
group by i1.invoice_number, i1.invoice_total 
having i1.invoice_total > avg(i2.payment_total)
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select
  invoice_number,
  invoice_total
from (
  select 
    invoice_number,
    invoice_total ,
    avg(payment_total) over () avg_payment_total
  from
    invoices)
where
  invoice_total>avg_payment_total;
share|improve this answer
    
But you still use subquery to slove this problem( –  Yuliya Sokhrannaya Mar 28 '13 at 8:59
1  
That's an in-line view. –  David Aldridge Mar 28 '13 at 9:00
    
Is it possible to slove this task without any view? Just join? –  Yuliya Sokhrannaya Mar 28 '13 at 9:04
    
How about with a common table expression? Does that count as a subquery? –  David Aldridge Mar 28 '13 at 9:05
    
Im not sure, It needs to use "Select" once! –  Yuliya Sokhrannaya Mar 28 '13 at 9:08

Here's a couple ways to do it. I don't guarantee your professor will accept them.

For our first alternative, you first create a function:

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION AVG_PAYMENT_TOTAL_FUNC RETURN NUMBER IS
  nAvg_payment_total  NUMBER;
BEGIN
  SELECT AVG(PAYMENT_TOTAL)
    INTO nAvg_payment_total
    FROM INVOICES;

  RETURN nAvg_payment_total;
END AVG_PAYMENT_TOTAL_FUNC;

then you use the function in a query:

select i.invoice_number, i.invoice_total 
  from invoices i 
  where i.invoice_total > AVG_PAYMENT_TOTAL_FUNC;

The second alternative would be to create a view:

CREATE OR REPLACE VIEW AVG_PAYMENT_TOTAL_VIEW AS
  SELECT AVG(PAYMENT_TOTAL) AS AVG_PAYMENT_TOTAL
    FROM INVOICES;

and then your query becomes

SELECT i.INVOICE_NUMBER,
       i.INVOICE_TOTAL,
       t.AVG_PAYMENT_TOTAL
  FROM INVOICES i
  CROSS JOIN AVG_PAYMENT_TOTAL_VIEW t;

Short of something like this I can't see a way to accomplish what you've been assigned. More to the point, I can't picture any reason WHY anyone would care whether there's one or two SELECT keywords in a query. Requiring that a developer come up with some quirky/geeky/nerdy way to accomplish all the above in a single query with only one SELECT keyword is a waste of time. There are perfectly reasonable ways to get this done quickly and sensibly; requiring someone to solve the problem otherwise is neither productive or efficient, and is therefore and IMO pointless.

Share and enjoy.

share|improve this answer
with average as (select avg(payment_total) avgtot
                 from invoices)
select i.invoice_number, i.invoice_total 
  from invoices i 
  ,    average a
 where i.invoice_total>a.avgtot;
share|improve this answer
    
a WITh clause is still a sub-query –  APC Mar 29 '13 at 0:57

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