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I have several dictionaries which I'd like to combine such that if a key is in multiple dictionaries the values are added together. For example:

d1 = {1: 10, 2: 20, 3: 30}
d2 = {1: 1, 2: 2, 3: 3}
d3 = {0: 0}

merged = {1: 11, 2: 22, 3: 33, 0: 0}

What is the best way to do this in Python? I was looking at defaultdict and trying to come up with something. I'm using Python 2.6.

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1  
None of these are really duplicates. –  sloth Mar 28 '13 at 9:12
    
@Bakuriu: I think both of those are different -- the first one doesn't do the Counter-like arithmetic, and the second one doesn't seem to mind the loss of the keys with zero values. (Which actually surprises me -- up until today I'd never known that Counter objects dropped the zero-valued keys when doing arithmetic.) –  DSM Mar 28 '13 at 9:13
    
Here's the relevant line. –  sloth Mar 28 '13 at 9:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

using a defaultdict:

>>> d = defaultdict(int)
>>> for di in [d1,d2,d3]:
...   for k,v in di.items():
...     d[k] += v
...
>>> dict(d)
{0: 0, 1: 11, 2: 22, 3: 33}
>>>
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With the very most python standard functions and libraries:

dlst = [d1, d2, d3]
for i in dlst:
    for x,y in i.items():
        n[x] = n.get(x, 0)+y

Instead of using if-else checks, using dict.get with default value 0 is simple and easy.

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+1. I always forget about get() –  sloth Mar 28 '13 at 9:32
    
That might be a bit faster that defaultdict usage, but iw would be so small and quite ignorable. –  FallenAngel Mar 28 '13 at 9:36

without importing anything. .

d4={}
for d in [d1,d2,d3]:
    for k,v in d.items():
        d4.setdefault(k,0)
        d4[k]+=v
print d4

output:

{0: 0, 1: 11, 2: 22, 3: 33}
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Doesn't work because OP has python 2.6 –  jamylak Mar 28 '13 at 9:11
    
Also Counter already implements __add__ the way the OP wants. –  Bakuriu Mar 28 '13 at 9:13
    
I can see the reason for this was to allow the 0:0 to exist, however since OP has python 2.6 it won't work –  jamylak Mar 28 '13 at 9:14
    
i have removed Counter and see the updated answer. .without importing anything. . –  namit Mar 28 '13 at 9:16

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