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var Foo = (function () {

    var cls = function () {
        this.prototype = {
            sayhi: function () {
                alert('hi');
            }
        };
    };

    cls.staticMethod = function () {};

    return cls;

})();

var f = new Foo();

Why can't i access my sayhi method? Doesn't this refer to the cls variable?

share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

You are attempting to set the prototype property on every instance of cls. What you actually want to do is set the prototype property of cls itself:

var Foo = (function () {

    var cls = function () {}; // Constructor function

    cls.prototype = { // Prototype of constructor is inherited by instances
        sayhi: function () {
            alert('hi');
        }
    };

    return cls;

})();
share|improve this answer
    
Good answer. Do you know what I'm missing here jsfiddle.net/6Wqsm/3? The output is cls {}, cls {sayhi: function}, but aren't both using the same prototype and should therefore share the sayhi function? – Matt Zeunert Mar 28 '13 at 9:45
    
No, because the prototype is overwritten with a new object each time you call cls. Setting the prototype inside the constructor will cause all sorts of problems. For example, try window.f instanceof foo in your example - it will return false. – James Allardice Mar 28 '13 at 9:58
    
Oh, I didn't think about the overwrite part. Thank you. – Matt Zeunert Mar 28 '13 at 10:01

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