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Well, that's pretty much what happens.

We've all seen this before: button becomes active and clickable only after we've put something in an input filed. I'm trying to implement that. I guess either I've gone the wrong way and I should've placed my jQuery selectors differently, or it's just something wrong with the code.

$('textarea').bind({'keyup' : function(){
    if ($(this).val().trim().length){
        $('.send-feedback').removeClass('inactive').click(function(){
            console.log('clicked');
        });
    } else {
        $('.send-feedback').addClass('inactive').off('click');
    }
}})

Basically, I see 'clicked' in the console multiple times, but if I add console.log('key pressed') before the if check, it's being shown once per keydown, as expected.

Any advice?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You may as well just set the button to disabled. This will prevent the click event from firing:

if($('textarea').val().trim().length > 0)
    $('.send-feedback').removeAttr('disabled');
else
    $('.send-feedback').attr('disabled','disabled');

Then separate your click function:

$('textarea').on('input', function(){ ... });
$('.send-feedback').on('click', function() { ... });

JSFiddle example.

thing is, it's not really a button, but an <a>

In that case you can use classes, which I suppose is sort of what you're currently doing:

HTML:

<a href="#" class="send-feedback disabled">Click</a>

JavaScript textarea length check:

if( $(this).val().trim().length > 0 )
    $('.send-feedback').removeClass('disabled');
else
    $('.send-feedback').addClass('disabled');

JavaScript click function:

$('.send-feedback').on('click', function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    if($(this).hasClass('disabled'))
        return;

    alert('Clicked!');
});

JSFiddle example.

share|improve this answer
    
thing is, it's not really a button, but an <a>. Also, wouldn't an IDE highlight the last line because of a duplicate jQuery selector? –  Loki Mar 28 '13 at 11:01
    
You should have specified that in your question. Let me just update my answer. –  James Donnelly Mar 28 '13 at 11:02
    
No need to, Richard has already aswered, I'm just waiting to accept his answer. On the other hand, attr and removeAttr will surely come in handy later. Thank you for helping me learn :) –  Loki Mar 28 '13 at 11:05
    
@Loki I've added a second JSFiddle example. –  James Donnelly Mar 28 '13 at 11:06
1  
Works :) Thanks for detailed explanation –  Loki Mar 28 '13 at 11:14

You are rebinding the click event on every keyup event.

Change the code to check that the button is inactive before binding the click by adding .inactive to the selector:

$('textarea').bind({'keyup' : function(){
    if ($(this).val().trim().length){
        $('.send-feedback.inactive').removeClass('inactive').click(function(){
            console.log('clicked');
        });
    } else {
        $('.send-feedback').addClass('inactive').off('click');
    }
}})

JSFiddle Example

share|improve this answer
    
that solves the problem perfectly, thank you, I'll accept the answer when I can. –  Loki Mar 28 '13 at 11:00

Every time you enter a letter (keyup), you add the event click to .send-feedback.

If you have many .send-feedback, you'll have

(nbr of chars in textarea) * (number of .send-feedback)

times the "clicked" text appear.

You should only add the click event if the .send-feedback has the class "inactive".

Here :

$('textarea').bind({'keyup' : function(){
    if ($(this).val().trim().length) {
        if ($('.send-feedback').hasClass('inactive')){
            $('.send-feedback').removeClass('inactive').click(function(){
                console.log('clicked');
            });
        }
    } else {
        $('.send-feedback').addClass('inactive').off('click');
    }
}})
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Thank you for the answer, sadly it repeats the previous one :) –  Loki Mar 28 '13 at 11:02
    
"It repeat the previous one" meaning the code is incorrect, or it repeat a previous answer (because if it's the former, I don't know where but I can fix it, for the later, well, too late for me ;)) –  Cyril N. Mar 28 '13 at 12:07
    
The one that I've accepted :) –  Loki Mar 28 '13 at 12:11

I've created this fiddle for you, I hope it will help:

It goes like this:

var el = $(this);
var btn = $("#btnDoStuff");

if(el.val().length > 0)
    btn.prop("disabled", false);
else
    btn.prop("disabled", true);

I hope I didn't misunderstood the issue.

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1  
unfortunately, that doesn't help. thank you for your time though –  Loki Mar 28 '13 at 11:17

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