Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Just for practice I'm trying to write a calculator program. To make it difficult I trying to use some of the advanced inheritance topics I've learned, but not really used. Lets say you have an interface named IMath with one method string DoMath(). Is it possible to have a variable written in the IMath interface that all classes implementing that interface would see new values? So for example my class Add : IMath would have the method DoMath() and in that DoMath() method would change the value of the variable double ITotal which all classes that implement the IMath interface would see the new value.

share|improve this question
    
Why string DoMath, and not double DoMath? –  Richard Everett Mar 28 '13 at 11:12
    
because the output on the calculator is a string. I send a string, I should get a string back. –  Craig Smith Mar 28 '13 at 11:13
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

It sounds like what you're looking for is an abstract base class.

One possible implementation of what you describe is shown below.

public abstract class MathBase
{
    public double Total { get; protected set; }

    public abstract string DoMath(double value);

    protected double ParseValue(string value)
    {
        double parsedValue;

        if (!double.TryParse(value, out parsedValue))
        {
            throw new ArgumentException(string.Format("The value '{0}' is not a number.", value), "value");
        }

        return parsedValue;
    }
}

public class Add : MathBase
{
    public override string DoMath(string value)
    {
        Total += ParseValue(value);

        return Convert.ToString(Total);
    }
}

If you wanted every instance of every class that inherits from MathBase to share the same Total value, you would declare it as static:

public abstract class MathBase
{
    public static double Total { get; protected set; }

    public abstract string DoMath(string value);
}

(although I'm not really sure why you would want this)

share|improve this answer
    
when you update protected double _total, will all classes implementing MathBase see the update? –  Craig Smith Mar 28 '13 at 11:11
    
cool, I think that's what I'm looking for. –  Craig Smith Mar 28 '13 at 11:13
    
I do want them to share the same value, for instance I call Subtract : MathBase, Subtract can use the number to be subtracted and the current total, then multiply, divide can all do that too –  Craig Smith Mar 28 '13 at 11:17
    
yes that's what I'm looking for. –  Craig Smith Mar 28 '13 at 11:26
    
I'm trying it out now, but it seems like this is what I'm looking for. I have a job interview tomorrow and wanted to show/(refresh my memory) that I can use some of these advanced methods. –  Craig Smith Mar 28 '13 at 11:33
add comment

You cannot specify variables or fields in interfaces, you can only specify:

  • Methods
  • Properties
  • Indexers
  • Events

See the C# documentation on interfaces for more information about this.

An interface dictates expected behavior, it does not dictate expected implementation. A property can be read as "the ability to retrieve the value of X" or "the ability to provide the value of X", where as a variable is "the ability to store X". This is not the same thing, and interfaces cannot make that guarantee.

If you absolutely need to enforce the presence of a variable, you should use a base class. I would probably look into combining these things, use interfaces for the external interface (ie. how should my calculator function) and base class and inheritance to avoid rewriting the same code over and over.

share|improve this answer
add comment

You could do something like this:

interface IMath
{
    string DoMath();
}

abstract class MathBase : IMath
{
    protected double Total { get; set; }

    public abstract string DoMath();
}

class Add : MathBase
{
    public override string DoMath()
    {
        this.Total = 2;

        return "2";
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
would all classes implementing MathBase see the new value? –  Craig Smith Mar 28 '13 at 11:12
    
Yes they would, as the Total property is protected, which means that only the base class itself or any classes inheriting from it can access it. –  Erik Schierboom Mar 28 '13 at 11:14
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.