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WCF 4.5 supports GZIP without third party libraries or handwritten extensions. I got it working via TCP Binding, but cannot find a way to get it working via HTTP Binding. my wcf - Service is self hosted in a windows service.

Addon: i am not allowed to use IIS; i can't switch to any WCF replacement.

this works with gzip:

binding="customBinding" bindingConfiguration="tcpCompressionBinding" name="tcp" 

and this is what i currently use for http:

binding="basicHttpBinding" bindingConfiguration="httpBinding" name="http"

The documentation does not really help me: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd456789.aspx.

But, according to this it should work:

Beginning with WCF 4.5 the WCF binary encoder adds support for compression. The type of compression is configured with the CompressionFormat property. Both the client and the service must configure the CompressionFormat property. Compression will work for HTTP, HTTPS, and TCP protocols. If a client specifies to use compression but the service does not support it a protocol exception is thrown indicating a protocol mismatch. For more information, see Choosing a Message Encoder

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Some time time ago I had the same problem with WCF 4.0 –  rekire Mar 28 '13 at 20:44
1  
dont think so. wcf 4.0 had no build in gzip support. it is a 4.5 feature. –  NickD Mar 28 '13 at 20:45
1  
I guess you already read this in the documentation but just in case you missed it: "Beginning with WCF 4.5 the WCF binary encoder adds support for compression. This enables you to use the gzip/deflate algorithm for sending compressed messages from a WCF client and also respond with compressed messages from a self-hosted WCF service. This feature enables compression on both the HTTP and TCP transports. An IIS hosted WCF service can always be enabled for sending compressed responses by configuring the IIS host server. The type of compression is configured with the CompressionFormat property." –  jpw Mar 30 '13 at 12:22
1  
"Since this property is only exposed on the binaryMessageEncodingBindingElement, you will need to create a custom binding like the following to use this feature: <customBinding> <binding name="BinaryCompressionBinding"> <binaryMessageEncoding compressionFormat ="GZip"/> <httpTransport /> </binding> </customBinding> Both the client and the service need to agree to send and receive compressed messages and therefore the compressionFormat property must be configured on the binaryMessageEncoding element on both client and service. " –  jpw Mar 30 '13 at 12:22
2  
Have you checked out IIS level compression? stackoverflow.com/questions/1735088/… –  lcryder Apr 1 '13 at 18:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

As per request I copied my comment as answer:

"Since this property is only exposed on the binaryMessageEncodingBindingElement, you will need to create a custom binding like the following to use this feature:

<customBinding>
  <binding name="BinaryCompressionBinding"> 
    <binaryMessageEncoding compressionFormat="GZip"/> 
    <httpTransport /> 
  </binding>
</customBinding> 

and receive compressed messages and therefore the compressionFormat property must be configured on the binaryMessageEncoding element on both client and service. "Both the client and the service need to agree to send

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We implemented protobuf-net for a client project and had very good results.

Obviously, if you already have a huge investment in WCF, this may not be an option.

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i am not able to change this, as it affects existing customers :-( –  NickD Apr 6 '13 at 7:47
    
-1 Question is not an answer. –  ta.speot.is Apr 7 '13 at 11:30

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