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In powershell i am writing a script using 'if' condition to check a folder for files received in last 2 hours. The code works fine and the output is written to the screen, instead i want it to write to a file which can be emailed. Request for kind help. Regards Abhijeet

EDIT: Code

$f = 'D:\usr\for_check' 
$files = ls $f 
Foreach ($file in $files) 
{ 
    $createtime = $file.CreationTime 
    $nowtime = get-date 
    if (($nowtime - $createtime).totalhours -le 2) 
    {
        "$file"
    } 
}
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code is way too complicated. Something like this would be more PoSh:

$src = "D:\usr\for_check"
$out = "C:\output.txt"

$append = $false

Get-ChildItem $src | ? {
  $_.CreationTime -ge (Get-Date).AddHours(-2)
} | % { $_.Name } | Out-File $out -Append:$append
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@ Ansgar the output.txt returns the ps file name which is check_last2_hrs1.ps1...instead of desired file name that were created in last 2 hours –  Abhijeet Bhujbbal Mar 28 '13 at 12:24
    
I just made some adjustments to the code and checked again, and it does produce the names of the files that were created in the last 2 hours in the directory $src. If you get different results: show the code you're using now. –  Ansgar Wiechers Mar 28 '13 at 12:33
    
my mistake i saved and ran the script from the folder which was to be searched....the script file was modified in last 2 hours thats the reason it was showing the script file name..realized and corrected it..Thnks a lot for kind support.. –  Abhijeet Bhujbbal Mar 28 '13 at 12:45
    
I suspected that might be the case. DAMHIKT. –  mjolinor Mar 28 '13 at 12:48

You can either use the redirection operator > or Out-File

Examples:

"abc" > c:\out.txt

"abc" | Out-File c:\out.txt
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@RB.thanks but the > and out-file does not give any output –  Abhijeet Bhujbbal Mar 28 '13 at 11:15
    
The code $f = 'D:\usr\for_check' $files = ls $f Foreach ($file in $files) { $createtime = $file.CreationTime $nowtime = get-date if (($nowtime - $createtime).totalhours -le 2) {"$file"} } Gives correct out put but on the screen..if i {"$file" | out-file d:\usr\aaa.out} this gives partial out put compared to that on screen –  Abhijeet Bhujbbal Mar 28 '13 at 11:22

You will want to use the >> operator instead of > or out-file operators as they will overwrite the file every time it's used. Whereas the >> operator will write to the file on the next line.

Example:

$file >> c:\out.txt

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>> is equivalent to | Out-File -Append. –  Ansgar Wiechers Mar 28 '13 at 12:06
    
+1. Did not know about >> in Powershell. –  Neolisk Mar 28 '13 at 12:28

Writing each line to the file inside the loop can cause a lot of disk I/O. You can wrap the loop in a script block, and then output all the lines to the file in one write operation.

$f = 'D:\usr\for_check' 
$files = ls $f 
&{Foreach ($file in $files) 
  { 
    $createtime = $file.CreationTime 
    $nowtime = get-date 
    if (($nowtime - $createtime).totalhours -le 2) 
    {
        "$file"
    } 
  }
 } | set-content c:\outfile.tx
share|improve this answer
    
@ mjolinor I tried the code you gave but the 'outfile.txt' contains this line check_last2_hrs1.ps1 –  Abhijeet Bhujbbal Mar 28 '13 at 12:23
    
Is that one of the files in the directory? –  mjolinor Mar 28 '13 at 12:36
    
@ mjolinor found the reason..had saved and ran the script file from the target folder and this was only the file modified in last 2 hours hence was showing the file name..thnks for the kind help though.. :) –  Abhijeet Bhujbbal Mar 28 '13 at 12:46

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