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An intern who works with me showed me an exam he had taken in computer science about endianness issues. There was a question that showed an ASCII string "My-Pizza", and the student had to show how that string would be represented in memory on a little endian computer. Of course, this sounds like a trick question because ASCII strings are not affected by endian issues.

But shockingly, the intern claims his professor insists that the string would be represented as:

P-yM azzi

I know this can't be right. There is no way an ASCII string would be represented like that on any machine. But apparently, the professor is insisting on this. So, I wrote up a small C program and told the intern to give it to his professor.

#include <string.h>
#include <stdio.h>

int main()
{
    const char* s = "My-Pizza";
    size_t length = strlen(s);
    for (const char* it = s; it < s + length; ++it) {
        printf("%p : %c\n", it, *it);
    }
}

This clearly demonstrates that the string is stored as "My-Pizza" in memory. A day later, the intern gets back to me and tells me the professor is now claiming that C is automagically converting the addresses to display the string in proper order.

I told him his professor is insane, and this is clearly wrong. But just to check my own sanity here, I decided to post this on stackoverflow so I could get others to confirm what I'm saying.

So, I ask : who is right here?

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4  
No need for a debugger: the OP's (well-played) use of the %p format specifier tells you all you really need to know. –  Chris Lutz Oct 14 '09 at 18:43
10  
Though that strlen() in a for() loop conditional makes me cringe. –  Chris Lutz Oct 14 '09 at 18:43
2  
I don't suppose you'd care to name this professor. –  Crashworks Oct 14 '09 at 22:07
1  
Although it doesn't matter in this question I removed the strlen call from the loop so that less people write like that when coming for an interview. –  sharptooth Oct 15 '09 at 5:14
5  
@Ross, you're conflating how the string can be represented in a certain format, versus how it is actually stored in memory, which is the issue here. By your logic, a Spanish translation of the string would also be a valid "representation" because it is one way a particular application may "interpret" the string. –  Charles Salvia Oct 15 '09 at 13:52
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12 Answers 12

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Without a doubt, you are correct.

ANSI C standard 6.1.4 specifies that string literals are stored in memory by "concatenating" the characters in the literal.

ANSI standard 6.3.6 also specifies the effect of addition on a pointer value:

When an expression that has integral type is added to or subtracted from a pointer, the result has the type of the pointer operand. If the pointer operand points to an element of an array object, and the array is large enough, the result points to an element offset from the original element such that the difference of the subscripts of the resulting and original array elements equals the integral expression.

If the idea attributed to this person were correct, then the compiler would also have to monkey around with integer math when the integers are used as array indices. Many other fallacies would also result which are left to the imagination.

The person may be confused, because (unlike a string initializer), multi-byte chacter constants such as 'ABCD' are stored in endian order.

There are many reasons a person might be confused about this. As others have suggested here, he may be misreading what he sees in a debugger window, where the contents have been byte-swapped for readability of int values.

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8  
It may be that the professor is looking at memory in his debugger in a 32-bit mode and is confused by the endianness? –  Carl Norum Oct 14 '09 at 18:56
    
This is all just a communication gap due to so few people having seen an actual dump and the fact that no one here recognizes that you have to print one thousand as 1,000, not 000,1. This totally wrong answer has 8 votes from equally confused readers... –  DigitalRoss Oct 15 '09 at 5:14
2  
"Totally wrong"? Be more specific? –  Heath Hunnicutt Oct 15 '09 at 7:52
    
@DigitalRoss. Listen, Ross, I don't appreciate your comment. I have been reading dumps for 29 years at this point. My answer is totally correct. Witness to this fact is your inability to explicate any specific to the contrary. Or: please do explain yourself. –  Heath Hunnicutt Jan 29 '13 at 1:56
    
The confusion lies in understanding the byte order within words of a little endian machine. ASCII characters will be stored in successive bytes, but bytes are physically ordered "backwards" in memory itself. Please see my answer for references and pictures stackoverflow.com/a/14570771/922168 –  nickaknudson Jan 29 '13 at 17:00
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The professor is confused. In order to see something like 'P-yM azzi' you need to take some memory inspection tool that displays memory in '4-byte integer' mode and at the same time gives you a "character interpretation" of each integer in higher-order byte to lower-order byte mode.

This, of course, has nothing to do with the string itself. And to say that the string itself is represented that way on a little-endian machine is utter nonsense.

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OK, @AndreyT, I think I need your help on this one. As usual, you are right, but could it be: that's exactly what the prof meant? I have a feeling the SO crowd has lurched in the wrong direction on this one... –  DigitalRoss Oct 15 '09 at 6:48
2  
Hmm... Maybe, but what would be the "correct" answer in this case? If one inspects little-endian memory as a sequence of bytes, one'd see 'My-Pizza' in there. If one interpret it as a sequence of 2-byte ints, it would be 'yM P- zi az'. In case of 4-byte ints it's 'P-yM azzi'. And finally a 8-byte int interpretation would give 'azziP-yM'. All these "interpretations" are just that - interpretations, ways to display data in memory. All of them are "correct", once one understands where they come from. Nothing gives the professor the basis to insist on just one of them as the "right" one. –  AndreyT Oct 15 '09 at 10:47
1  
It makes very little sense for a debugger to say "This integer, if stored on a machine with different endianness, would represent this different string in memory". –  caf Oct 15 '09 at 20:04
    
Agreed with @AndreyT's comment. The professor should have specified the size of each word. In this case, the professor assumed a 4-byte (32-bit) word. –  nickaknudson Jan 28 '13 at 20:46
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You can quite easily prove that the compiler is doing no such "magic" transformations, by doing the printing in a function that doesn't know it's been passed a string:

int foo(const void *mem, int n)
{
    const char *cptr, *end;
    for (cptr = mem, end = cptr + n; cptr < end; cptr++)
        printf("%p : %c\n", cptr, *cptr);
}

int main()
{
    const char* s = "My-Pizza";

    foo(s, strlen(s));
    foo(s + 1, strlen(s) - 1);
}

Hell, you can even compile to assembly with gcc -S and conclusively determine the absence of magic.

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5  
+1 for ASM. Also, you can write this routine IN assembly just to prove it. –  Paul Nathan Oct 14 '09 at 22:08
1  
+1 for assembly, I went back and linked to this answer from stackoverflow.com/questions/1565567/… –  sharptooth Oct 15 '09 at 5:20
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The professor is wrong if we're talking about a system that uses 8 bits per character.

I often work with embedded systems that actually use 16-bit characters, each word being little-endian. On such a system, the string "My-Pizza" would indeed be stored as "yMP-ziaz".

But as long as it's an 8-bit-per-character system, the string will always be stored as "My-Pizza" independent of the endian-ness of the higher-level architecture.

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1  
What system is that? –  Heath Hunnicutt Oct 14 '09 at 18:43
    
+1 Heath, I've done a lot of embedded work and never seen something weird like that. –  Carl Norum Oct 14 '09 at 18:52
2  
One product I've worked on uses a Texas Instruments DSP (2808, I think), whose smallest addressable unit of memory is 16 bits. –  Dmitry Brant Oct 14 '09 at 19:02
    
Aha, all bets are off when it comes to DSP. How would you write the OP's program with only 16-bit addressing? Do you have to decompose the 16-bit chunks into 8-bit pieces yourself? –  Carl Norum Oct 14 '09 at 19:04
1  
Please stop calling them bytes with more than 8 bits... What you're talking about is the word size of the processor not the byte size... ;) –  s1lence Feb 3 '12 at 3:03
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But shockingly, the intern claims his professor insists that the string would be represented as:

P-yM azzi

It would be represented as, represented as what? represented to user as 32bit integer dump? or represented/layout in computer's memory as P-yM azzi?

If the professor said "My-Pizza" would be represented/layout as "P-yM azzi" in computer's memory because the computer is of little endian architecture, somebody, please, got to teach that professor how to use a debugger! I think that's where all the professor's confusions stems from, I have an inkling that the professor is not a coder(not that I'm looking down upon the professor), I think he don't have a way to prove in code what he learned about endian-ness.

Maybe the professor learned the endian-ness stuff just about a week ago, then he just use a debugger incorrectly, quickly delighted about his newly unique insight on computers and then preach it to his students immediately.

If the professor said endian-ness of machine has a bearing on how ascii strings would be represented in memory, he need to clean up his act, somebody should correct him.

If the professor gave an example instead on how integers are represented/layout in machines differently depending on machine's endianness, his students could appreaciate what he is teaching all about.

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I assume the professor was trying to make a point by analogy about the endian/NUXI problem, but you're right when you apply it to actual strings. Don't let that derail from the fact that he was trying to teach students a point and how to think about a problem a certain way.

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5  
Teaching someone a "point" by telling lies isn't teaching anything. That's horrible, don't let him get away with it. –  Carl Norum Oct 14 '09 at 18:51
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You may be interested, it is possible to emulate a little-endian architecture on a big-endian machine, or vice-versa. The compiler has to emit code which auto-magically messes with the least significant bits of char* pointers whenever it dereferences them: on a 32bit machine you'd map 00 <-> 11 and 01 <-> 10.

So, if you write the number 0x01020304 on a big-endian machine, and read back the "first" byte of that with this address-munging, then you get the least significant byte, 0x04. The C implementation is little-endian even though the hardware is big-endian.

You need a similar trick for short accesses. Unaligned accesses (if supported) may not refer to adjacent bytes. You also can't use native stores for types bigger than a word because they'd appear word-swapped when read back one byte at a time.

Obviously however, little-endian machines do not do this all the time, it's a very specialist requirement and it prevents you using the native ABI. Sounds to me as though the professor thinks of actual numbers as being "in fact" big-endian, and is deeply confused what a little-endian architecture really is and/or how its memory is being represented.

It's true that the string is "represented as" P-yM azzi on 32bit l-e machines, but only if by "represented" you mean "reading the words of the representation in order of increasing address, but printing the bytes of each word big-endian". As others have said, this is what some debugger memory views might do, so it is indeed a representation of the contents of the memory. But if you're going to represent the individual bytes, then it is more usual to list them in order of increasing address, no matter whether words are stored b-e or l-e, rather than represent each word as a multi-char literal. Certainly there is no pointer-fiddling going on, and if the professor's chosen representation has led him to think that there is some, then it has misled him.

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1  
What!? Name me one such compiler that emits these automagic codes the munge the bottom two bits of every pointer access everywhere. –  Adam Rosenfield Oct 14 '09 at 21:56
    
I have specialized library functions for doing this on the 1 in 10 million case this is actually correct. –  Joshua Oct 15 '09 at 3:29
    
@Adam: not strictly the compiler, but the so-called "translator", which you can consider like a compiler back-end, for Tao Group's now sadly defunct "intent". The intent environment was always little-endian, even on big-endian hardware. This made implementing network drivers a little confusing, since intent code had one endianness, and inline native assembler the opposite. And as I specifically stated, it did not munge every pointer access, it only munged non word-size pointer access. Made it easier for writers of portable apps to test, because they didn't need a b-e platform to hand. –  Steve Jessop Oct 15 '09 at 10:43
    
The more important goal, though, was that intent had a virtual assembler language and byte code, which in order to be portable needed to have a consistent endian-ness, consistent sizes of builtin types, etc. It was then up to the translator to make this work on a given platform. –  Steve Jessop Oct 15 '09 at 11:00
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Also, (And I haven't played with this in a long time, so I might be wrong) He might be thinking of pascol, where strings are represented as "packed arrays" which, IIRC are characters packed into 4 byte integers?

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AFAIK, endianness only makes sense when you want to break a large value into small ones. Therefore I don't think that C-style string are affected with it. Because they are after all just arrays of characters. When you are reading only one byte, how could it matter if you read it from left or right?

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It's hard to read the prof's mind and certainly the compiler is not doing anything other than storing bytes to adjacent increasing addresses on both BE and LE systems, but it is normal to display memory in word-sized numbers, for whatever the word size is, and we write one thousand as 1,000. Not 000,1.

$ cat > /tmp/pizza
My-Pizza^D
$ od -X /tmp/pizza
0000000 502d794d 617a7a69
0000010
$

For the record, y == 79, M == 4d.

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Actually, such a format is pretty standard. A 32-bit dump with ASCII alongside in my ARM debugger shows me the 32-bit words in the right (logical) order, but the ASCII dump is in bytewise order. –  Carl Norum Oct 15 '09 at 4:14
3  
Probably because it's utterly ridiculous to use a ten-mile-long confusing explanation to justify a statement that is still completely wrong. The question was whether the bytes are in memory in that order, and they're not. The fact that they will appear backwards if you go out of your way to print them backwards proves nothing. –  hobbs Oct 15 '09 at 7:59
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No, this idea occurred to Carl Norum 5 hours before your post. The OP made a specific statement with: "A day later, the intern gets back to me and tells me the professor is now claiming that C is automagically converting the addresses to display the string in proper order." The OP seems to have faith in the intern who is passing the message for him, but that could surely be the problem. Also, the OP wants to know what is correct, and he seems to want some references. I agree with your psychoanalysis that this likely stemmed from a miscommunication, but does that answer the OP's question? –  Heath Hunnicutt Oct 15 '09 at 8:02
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When I'm sayng that the professor is confused, I mean that he's wrong to insist on one and only one representation method as The Only True One, while, as you yourself said above, they both are right. Moreover, there are more ways to interpret the memory contents in this case. Now, as an additional note, when one's talking about strings (sequences of bytes), trying to push a 4-byte int memory view as the only appropriate way to inspect the memory is what I'd call "unorthodox". –  AndreyT Oct 15 '09 at 10:55
2  
Look, assuming the intern I'm speaking with is giving me the facts accurately, the professor is simply wrong. Some here have argued that the professor is correct "from a certain point of view", i.e. the string can be "represented" as "P-yM azzi" if you use a debugger and interpret the memory as a 32-bit integer. Granted, this is true, but this is totally misleading and has no bearing on how the string is ACTUALLY stored in memory. And certainly, it is totally false that the C language does any kind of address "remapping" under the hood to compensate for endianness. –  Charles Salvia Oct 15 '09 at 13:41
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Does the professor's "C" code look anything like this? If so, he needs to update his compiler.

main() {
    extrn putchar;
    putchar('Hell');
    putchar('o, W');
    putchar('orld');
    putchar('!*n');
}
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I came across this and felt the need to clear it up. No one here seems to have addressed the concept of bytes and words or how to address them. A byte is 8-bits. A word is a collection of bytes.

If the computer is:

  • byte addressable
  • with 4-byte (32-bit) words
  • word aligned
  • the memory is viewed "physically" (not dumped and byte-swapped)

then indeed, the professor would be correct. His failure to indicate this proves he doesn't exactly know what he is talking about, but he did understand the basic concept.

Byte Order Within Words: (a) Big Endian, (b) Little Endian

Byte Order Within Words: (a) Big Endian, (b) Little Endian

Character and Integer Data in Words: (a) Big Endian, (b) Little Endian

Character and Integer Data in Words: (a) Big Endian, (b) Little Endian

References

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1  
you wrote, "then indeed, the professor would be correct." And that is absolutely false. OP presented professor (via intern) with some C code that you may want to study until you understand it. In the meanwhile, I see you are able to assist people who use JavaScript and stuff like that. –  Heath Hunnicutt Jan 29 '13 at 18:04
1  
@Heath - The C code would have the same result executed on Big Endian or Little Endian. The physical diagram above for little endian makes the data look backwards but when it is traversed from increasing byte address, one byte at a time it would print in the same order on either system and result in "My-Pizza". Architecture professor wanted to see it displayed like the 2nd diagram above for Little Endian. This is very common type of question in computer architecture classes. This is the correct answer and I will go with the Intel published document being correct on this one. –  axawire Jun 15 '13 at 22:07
    
@axawire - There is no question as to the intel document or other well-known representations in word address (such as a "DD" command in a debugger). The question would be: how do these correct representations relate to the incorrect representation given by OP? The answer is psychological: they are attempts to make sense of the nonsense presented in the question. On their own, they are axiomatic in their correctness. In terms of answering OP's question, they are wrong. To answer in these terms; wrong. To pretend I question the convention: straw man. Good day, axawire. –  Heath Hunnicutt Jun 16 '13 at 17:10
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