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I have to make an ajax request in Rails application. This ajax request has to make many other http requests to a few servers. There might be a lot of them (requests).

def ajax_request
  # request to the server1....
  # request to the server2....
  # request to the server3....
  # request to the server4....
  respond_to {|format| format.js }
end

The problem is, of course, it can take a lot of time. Note that each request returns an independent a part of a data which can be shown on a page and it doesn't depend on the other requests.

What I'd like to do is to return the data partially like this

def ajax_request
  # request to the server1....
  respond_to {|format| format.js }

  # request to the server2....
  respond_to {|format| format.js }


  # request to the server3....
  respond_to {|format| format.js }


  # request to the server4....
  respond_to {|format| format.js }
end

I know that it won't work, nevertheless I'm looking for a code that will work the way I mentioned. What would you recommend me?

Another option would be to send many ajax requests

def ajax_request1
  # request to the server1....
  respond_to {|format| format.js }
end

def ajax_request2
  # request to the server2....
  respond_to {|format| format.js }
end

def ajax_request3
  # request to the server3....
  respond_to {|format| format.js }
end

but it might hurt the performance of my server, isn't it?

Your thoughts?

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2 Answers 2

3 fast responses is better than 1 long one. This is one of the reasons for pagination.

You can only have one response per request. Rails 4 does support server sent events which would change that a little, but is not likely to be what you want.

It really ends up being a balance, if you have tons of requests instead of 1 then that would be bad, but if you are splitting up 1 request into 2 or 3 then that's great and may actually perform better.

In the case of tons of requests then instead of having several responses you would just need to store your data in ivars pass it on to your view to handle.

If you aren't doing blocking I/O here then you can also break these out into separate threads to improve response time... and if you are doing blocking I/O, and expect a lot of these types of requests then it maybe a good idea to look into using a Ruby implementation that does real threads (JRuby or Rubinius) instead of MRI.

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It's almost universally better to make one request for all data than three separate requests for the same data. This isn't true unless you actually need all the data; if you get all of it but only need a third of it, then you're wasting time. It's not black-and-white, but for small requests, the overhead (network, session processing, param parsing, resource loading) often exceeds the actual specific request processing time. This is particularly true on mobile where bandwidth is decent but latency is very high; get as much per request as possible there. –  Jim Stewart Mar 28 '13 at 12:24
    
It depends. If the user is depending on that information then the 3 short requests is better than the 1 long one. When speaking of performance there is more than just the hit on the servers, there is the perceived performance by the user. Holding back information from the user because other bits are still being processed is not generally good UX. –  cpuguy83 Mar 28 '13 at 12:59
    
3 fast responses is better than 1 long one. there might significantly more than 3. –  Marius Kavansky Mar 28 '13 at 13:05
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Here's an idea using a cache server and background processing workers. For example let's assume Redis for caching and Resque for background processing, but you could also use memcached and backburner (beanstalkd) or anything else that serves the function.

When the initial request comes in, create a unique id for the request, possibly a GUID, and return that to the client as a JSON response. Use the GUID as a cache key (probably with some expiration time) to hold the results, and create one background task for each server you need to request data from. These background tasks should include any request parameters plus the GUID of the cache key.

Your resque workers can pull these tasks from the queue, run the requests, and put the responses as JSON into the redis/memcached cache store. If you have enough workers it can all be parallel, if not they'll all get done eventually, FIFO. Meanwhile the initial client can use long polling to request new results every 1-2 seconds. It may find no results, 1 new result, or several. Just need to keep track of which results are already seen, and when you have all the results. This way the user will see progressively more information come back, and you could even show percentages or "4 / 20 complete" type information.

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