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I have a tree class that has move constructors and move assignment operators declared and defined.

Why would the compiler feel the need to synthesize a copy constructor and then complain that std::unique_ptr has private members?

This seems counterproductive. Should the compiler not be aware that hidden copy and assignment with no body or simply not defined are to prevent trying to copy a std::unique_ptr?

And, why does declaring and defining copy constructors and assignment operators with an empty body make the compiler happy?

Will this be cause for concern as I continue writing and building code utilizing this class?

Additions:

  1. There is no source code because there are no source code errors ... this is a question
    that does not require presence of source code.

  2. The compiler complained when the copy constructors were private so I made them public; will make private again and verify if compiler hick-ups.

  3. I am using Visual Studio 2012 Professional IDE and its' associated compilers.

Why is the compiler generating copy constructors in the presence of move constructors? Seems counter-intuitive especially if copy constructors are not defined in the fist place.

Additional Question:

Well, it seems Visual Studio 2012 does not support = delete declarations on constructors or assignment operators and hiding my declarations causes the compiler to cry all over my code. What do I do now? I agree (below) that declaring do-nothing copy constructors is bad idea so what other options do I have?

If truly desiring small example, here it is. My compiler does not support = delete

class Tree{
    class TreeNode{
         "declaration of unique_ptr, cstrs, move cstrs, hidden copy cstrs"
    };
public:
     "declaration of unique_ptrs, cstrs, move cstrs, copy cstrs <----- compiler 
      complains if hidden"
};

Using boost::variant with this

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4  
Please show your C++ source code (or a small example equivalent to it) –  Basile Starynkevitch Mar 28 '13 at 12:04
    
The compiler would only complain if you actually attempt to copy or copy assign, which is perfectly reasonable. –  juanchopanza Mar 28 '13 at 12:07
    
If you want to make sure no one is using copy constructors and assignment operators you can define them private or ( = delete in c++11 ) –  kalvis Mar 28 '13 at 12:10
    
Also include what compiler you are using. Creating an empty copy constructor that does nothing is almost certainly a bad idea (especially in C++11). –  Yakk Mar 28 '13 at 12:59

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

If there isn't a copy constructor, the compiler will attempt to generate one. The default copy constructor is pretty dumb, so it's not surprising it's tripping over bits of your class.

Defining an empty one gives you a copy constructor that doesn't do anything, and this replaces the one the compiler would otherwise have generated, thus avoiding the problem.

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2  
It's not exactly avoiding the problem if the copy constructor doesn't create a copy. You are just trading it in for an other problem. –  Bo Persson Mar 28 '13 at 12:07
3  
You do not want an empty copy constructor that can be called: this can result in rather surprising behavior. Hide or delete it... –  Yakk Mar 28 '13 at 12:14
    
@Yakk: Or just let the compiler implicitly delete it. That will happen if there's a move constructor or a non-copyable member, both of which seem to be the case here. –  Mike Seymour Mar 28 '13 at 12:29
    
@MikeSeymour yes, which is why creating an empty copy constructor is often the wrong thing to do. If the compiler is complaining about the lack of copy constructor, it is probably because you did something that tried to call it. And if you now make an empty one and it "solves the problem", now your code tried to copy it, it finds the empty copy constructor, it does the wrong thing (maybe even eliding the empty copy constructor, so not even nothing), and then silently continues. You solved nothing. –  Yakk Mar 28 '13 at 12:35
    
@Yakk: Indeed; I was just saying that there's no need to explicitly hide or delete it, as you seemed to be suggesting; just leave it deleted. –  Mike Seymour Mar 28 '13 at 12:36

Why would the compiler feel the need to synthesize a copy constructor and then complain that std::unique_ptr has private members?

It shouldn't, unless your standard library is non-compliant, and declares a private rather than deleted copy-constructor for unique_ptr; even then, it should only be synthesised if you haven't declared a move constructor.

If your class has unique_ptr members, or if you declare a move constructor, then it should complain that the copy constructor is deleted; and then only if you write code that attempts to copy it.

Should the compiler not be aware that hidden copy and assignment with no body or simply not defined are to prevent trying to copy a std::unique_ptr?

That's right; except that the synthesised copy constructor and assignment are deleted, rather than not defined.

And, why does declaring and defining copy constructors and assignment operators with an empty body make the compiler happy?

Because you are explicitly saying that you want it to use that (empty) code for copying, rather than whatever code it might (or might not) generate implicitly. It's a bad idea though; if your class is not copyable, then you want an attempt to copy it to generate an error, rather than incorrect runtime behaviour.

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Does the presence of a move constructor not inhibit the generation of the copy constructor automatically? –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Mar 28 '13 at 12:19
    
@DavidRodríguez-dribeas: Almost; it will be declared but deleted. I'll update my answer... –  Mike Seymour Mar 28 '13 at 12:23
    
@MikeSeymour Yes ... = delete and the syntax is, if I recall, MyCopyConstructor(const MyCopyCOnstructor &other) = delete. Is that right? –  Mushy Mar 28 '13 at 13:48
    
@Mushy: If you want to delete it yourself, then that is the syntax. But there's no need to, since it should be automatically deleted if you don't declare it yourself. –  Mike Seymour Mar 28 '13 at 14:05
    
@MikeSeymour Problem is, if I don't declare a deleted copy constructor, the compiler attempts to synthesize one itself that is not deleted and then barfs all over my code. –  Mushy Mar 28 '13 at 14:26

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