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I have following XML.

<Parts>
  <Part name="Part1" disabled="true"></Part>
  <Part name="Part2" disabled="false"></Part>
  <Part name="Part3" ></Part>
  <Part name="Part4" disabled="true"></Part>  
</Parts>

I want to remove the nodes for which disabled attribute is set to true. If 'disabled' attribute is not used for any 'Part' element, it means it's not disabled.

I wrote following code:

XmlNode root = xmlDoc.DocumentElement;
List<XmlNode> disabledNodes = new List<XmlNode>();
foreach(XmlNode node in root.ChildNodes)
{
    if(node.Attributes["disabled"] != null && 
        Convert.ToBoolean(node.Attributes["disabled"].Value))
    {
        disabledNodes.Add(node);
    }
}

foreach (XmlNode node in disabledNodes)
{
    root .RemoveChild(node);
}

This code removes 2 nodes from the XML as expected.

I then wrote following code to make code compact:

foreach (XmlNode node in root.ChildNodes.Cast<XmlNode>()
    .Where(child => child.Attributes["disabled"] != null && 
    Convert.ToBoolean(child.Attributes["disabled"].Value)))
{
    root.RemoveChild(node); // This line works fine without any exception.
}

I found that this loop iterate only once, removing only one node from the XML.


EDITED QUESTION:

Now when I change the foreach loop, this time I convert the result of LINQ expression to the List<T> using ToList() method (as suggested by @Toni Petrina in his answer). And this time it works fine !

 foreach (XmlNode node in root.ChildNodes.Cast<XmlNode>()
        .Where(child => child.Attributes["disabled"] != null && 
        Convert.ToBoolean(child.Attributes["disabled"].Value)).ToList())
    {
        root.RemoveChild(node); // This line works fine without any exception.
    }

Why the use of ToList() made LINQ expression work in foreach loop as expected? Any technical reason why result of LINQ behaves differently in two different situations?

I am using .NET 4.0.

share|improve this question
3  
I think the problem is that you are iterating through "root" and at the same time try to delete something from it which isn't allowed with the foreach loop –  Ivan Crojach Karačić Mar 28 '13 at 12:15
1  
@CSharpLearner Remove the RemoveChild() code from the body of the foreach and see how many times it iterates? –  LukeHennerley Mar 28 '13 at 12:23
2  
I tried this code here: ideone.com/7gyQfj and got the error we are expecting (but you are not). Interestingly I tried on VSExpress 2012 and it worked as expected (removed all expected nodes). –  George Duckett Mar 28 '13 at 12:33
1  
It is no longer the same query. When you iterate over an collection from LINQ, you are requesting one item at a time. And you change the collection from which you pull your items. If you didn't modify the collection, it would work fine. Just remember: don't change the collection while you are iterating over it. –  Toni Petrina Mar 28 '13 at 12:53
1  
I've posted a question regarding why you don't see the exception in some cases. stackoverflow.com/questions/15682613/… –  George Duckett Mar 28 '13 at 13:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Write:

foreach (XmlNode node in root.ChildNodes.Cast<XmlNode>()
    .Where(child => child.Attributes["disabled"] != null && 
    Convert.ToBoolean(child.Attributes["disabled"].Value)).ToList())
{
    root.RemoveChild(node);
}

I've added extra ToList() to force immediate execution of the LINQ expression.

When you create a LINQ query, you get an IEnumerable collection which doesn't actually hold any results. Even though you wrote all those Select and Where and many other clause, the complete query isn't executed before you start iterating over it. Only then is the actually query run.

In the original code, you created a query and started iterating over it. You received the first item that passes through all LINQ clauses and remove the first node. But since you were iterating over root collection which is now modified, the iteration stops.

You cannot change the collection you are iterating over in the body of foreach loop.

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2  
Iterating over an IEnumerable will execute it. The code the OP has written should iterate the same elements as the code you have written. –  LukeHennerley Mar 28 '13 at 12:15
    
This might actually fix the issue (but for another reason). See this comment –  George Duckett Mar 28 '13 at 12:16
    
@LukeHennerley That might not be entirely true. Since the collection that is being iterated actually changes in the foreach body, forcing execution before iterating will prevent this problem. –  Toni Petrina Mar 28 '13 at 12:18
    
@LukeHennerley So I went through the trouble of actually compiling the code and it works, who would have figured that :/ –  Toni Petrina Mar 28 '13 at 12:31
    
@Toni Petrina: When I am iterating the LINQ expression in foreach loop, am I not 'using' the returned collection? And why does it iterate even once if this is the case? I found that your suggestion to converting it to List<T> actually solved the issue. But i want to know why does it work like that. And so I edited my original question too. –  CSharpLearner Mar 28 '13 at 12:36

Your problem is that you change collection when enumerate it. It is wrong. You should use something like this:

var disabledNodes = root.ChildNodes.Cast<XmlNode>()
    .Where(child => child.Attributes["disabled"] != null && 
    Convert.ToBoolean(child.Attributes["disabled"].Value)).ToArray();

foreach (XmlNode node in disabledNodes)
{
    root.RemoveChild(node);
}

Update

It is due to deffered execution. If you do not use ToArray() or ToList(), IEnumerator returns value one by one when you need next element (i.e. when foreach go to next turn). And when foreach execute first turn, your source become changed and iteration stopped. But if you call ToArray(), you get new variable that contains array of disabledNodes and foreach will not change collection that it iterates.

share|improve this answer
    
I know this can be done. But my question is 'why does not it work when the LINQ expression is directly written in the code'? –  CSharpLearner Mar 28 '13 at 12:23
    
That as is currently written doesn't change anything. You need to add a .ToList or something otherwise you're still iterating the underlying list while removing. –  George Duckett Mar 28 '13 at 12:23
    
Because my answer is actually correct. Everything done with LINQ is executed when requested, not when the statement ends. –  Toni Petrina Mar 28 '13 at 12:26
1  
Cause after first execution your source is changed and iteration stopped –  Kirill Bestemyanov Mar 28 '13 at 12:46
1  
@George, you are right, ToArray() or ToList() should be called. –  Kirill Bestemyanov Mar 28 '13 at 12:48

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