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i was trying a code with two threads one thread increments a shared long variable the other thread decrements the var.

class Shared {
    private long a;
    public void incr() {
        a++;
    }
    public void dec() { a--; }
    public long getA(){return a;}
}

i am passing this shared object to two Threads. Nitems number of times to increment or decrement in each thread

Shared obj = new Shared();
Incrementer incrementer = new Incrementer(obj, nitems);
Decrementer decrementer = new Decrementer(obj , nitems);

The run method of decrement thread:-

public void run()
{
    for(int i=0; i<nitems; ++i)
    {
        s.dec();
    }
}

The run method of increment thread:-

public void run()
{
    for(int i=0; i<nitems; ++i)
    {
        s.incr();

    }
}

when i run it. I could clearly see the problem. The result is not zero after running whole code 20 times. Ok now the same run method when changed like this

//increment
    public void run()
    {
        for(int i=0; i<nitems; ++i)
        {
            s.incr();
            System.out.println("ghijk");

        }
    }

//decrement
    public void run()
{
    for(int i=0; i<nitems; ++i)
    {
        s.dec();
        System.out.println("abcdef");
    }
}

the result is zero for almost all the time except for one or two times where the value was not zero. My question is when this SOP is introduced what made this code to work properly??? I thought only after synchronizing the incr() and dec() method this would produce zero as output.

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This is basically a classic race condition setup. You'll need to synchronize them, yes. –  Evan Knowles Mar 28 '13 at 12:31
    
You should use AtomicInteger instead of int with synchronization. Makes life easier. –  Ioan Mar 28 '13 at 12:42

3 Answers 3

If more than one thread have access to a field, you need to synchronize it.

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As others have pointed out, your incr() and dec() methods are not thread-safe without synchronize.

Adding the System.out.println may be changing the behavior simply because it changes the timing. Also, buried in this call is a synchronization that acts as an ersatz synchronize. This works better than no synchronization at all. Here's a possible sequence of events:

  1. Thread-1 ncrements the counter by 1 (it starts first so it goes first)
  2. Thread-1 goes to print.
  3. While Thread-1 is busy printing, Thread-2 decrements the counter.
  4. Thread-2 completes the decrement (before Thread-1 finishes printing).
  5. Thread-2 goes to print, but it has to wait because Thread-1 has the output stream locked.
  6. While Thread-2 is busy printing, Thread-1 loops back to step 1.

So, because the printing has a synchronized block, it allows the two threads to alternate which one is changing the variable and which one is printing. Occasionally, the timing will miss, the race condition will occur and the count will get out of sync.

Another issue that you may encounter on multicore systems is that Java threads can maintain local versions of variable values, so each thread may see its own copy. To prevent this, you need to declare the variable volatile. Non-volatile variables will be synchronized across threads when a synchronize block is encountered, so volatile is not what you need here. (Another side-effect of the println may be to ensure that a is synchronized across your two threads.)

For simplicity, use AtomicLong from the concurrency package.

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"Adding the System.out.println may be changing the behavior simply because it changes the timing. Also, buried in this call is a synchronization that acts as an ersatz synchronize. This works better than no synchronization at all." Could u please explain it in more detail –  Aniket Dutta Mar 28 '13 at 16:15
    
@AniketDutta Please see edits to my answer. Let me know if you need further detail. –  Charles Forsythe Mar 28 '13 at 18:39
    
Thank you for the answer... –  Aniket Dutta Mar 29 '13 at 7:45

Synchronize access to the methods that alter a.

class Shared {
    private long a;
    public synchronized void incr() {
        a++;
    }
    public synchronized void dec() {
        a--;
    }
    public long getA(){return a;}
}
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