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I want to copy a 2-dimensional Array. I want to do this with for-loops and I have a idea how to do so, but I can't complete the rest.

def copy(bild:Array[Array[Int]]):Unit = {

    for(x <- 0 until bild.length)
    for(y <- 0 until bild(x).length) {
        bild(x)(y) = 
        //i don't know how to create the new array
    }

}
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3  
First of the for structure is a comprehension not a loop in scala. –  korefn Mar 28 '13 at 12:47
1  
There are only one-dimensional arrays in Scala, Java and the JVM. Arrays of arrays are not multi-dimensional arrays. If you want them, you'll need to create them from the available linear Arrays. –  Randall Schulz Mar 28 '13 at 14:11
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5 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted
def copy(bild: Array[Array[Int]]):Unit = {
  val result = Array.ofDim[Array[Int]](bild.length)
  for(x <- 0 until bild.length) {
    result(x) = Array.ofDim[Int](bild(x).length)
    for(y <- 0 until bild(x).length) {
      result(x)(y) = bild(x)(y)
    }
  }
}
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Thank you very much :) –  Joe Wash Mar 28 '13 at 14:23
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you can use clone method as well !!

def copy(bild: Array[Array[Int]]): Unit = {
    val copy = bild.clone
} 

Update :

since, Array[Int] is still mutable references, cloning will still not solve the problem.. as mentioned by Andriy Plokhotnyuk in his comment..

Problem :

val og = Array(Array(1, 2, 3), Array(4,5,6))      //> og  : Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(1, 2, 3), Array(4, 5, 6))
val copy = og.clone                               //> copy  : Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(1, 2, 3), Array(4, 5, 6))
copy(0)(0) = 7
og                                                //> res2: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(7, 2, 3), Array(4, 5, 6))
copy                                              //> res3: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(7, 2, 3), Array(4, 5, 6))

Here any update to copy will reflect to og also..

Sol :

So I primarily need to clone Array[Int] as well.. hence..

val og = Array(Array(1, 2, 3), Array(4,5,6))      //> og  : Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(1, 2, 3), Array(4, 5, 6))
val copy = og.map(_.clone)                        //> copy  : Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(1, 2, 3), Array(4, 5, 6))
copy(0)(0) = 7
og                                                //> res2: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(1, 2, 3), Array(4, 5, 6))
copy                                              //> res3: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(7, 2, 3), Array(4, 5, 6))

Hence.. Refactoring copy method in the question to..

def copy(bild: Array[Array[Int]]): Unit = {
    val copy = bild.map(_.clone) 
}
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scala> val aa = Array(Array(1, 2, 3), Array(0, 4, 2)) aa: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(1, 2, 3), Array(0, 4, 2)) scala> aa.clone res0: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(1, 2, 3), Array(0, 4, 2)) scala> res0(0)(0) = 7 scala> res0 res2: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(7, 2, 3), Array(0, 4, 2)) scala> aa res3: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(7, 2, 3), Array(0, 4, 2)) –  Andriy Plokhotnyuk Mar 28 '13 at 14:05
1  
well then use .. aa.map(_.clone) :) –  Shrey Mar 28 '13 at 15:23
    
or if you don't want to use clone, then bild map (_ map identity) –  Luigi Plinge Mar 29 '13 at 0:42
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Quite simple:

scala> Array.ofDim[Int](3)
//res0: Array[Int] = Array(0, 0, 0)
scala> Array.ofDim[String](4)
//res1: Array[String] = Array(null, null, null, null)
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The easiest way to copy a 2-dimensional Array is array.clone, but if you want to do it on your own via for-comprehension you can use the following code:

def copy[A](arr: Array[Array[A]]) = for (x <- 0 until arr.length) yield for (y <- arr(x).length) yield arr(x)(y)

This will give you a Vector[Vector[A]].

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More efficient for large arrays:

scala> :paste
// Entering paste mode (ctrl-D to finish)

def copyOf(as: Array[Array[Int]]): Array[Array[Int]] = {
  val cas = Array.ofDim[Array[Int]](as.length)
  for(i <- 0 until as.length) {
    val a = as(i)
    cas(i) = java.util.Arrays.copyOf(a, a.length)
  }
  cas
}

// Exiting paste mode, now interpreting.

copyOf: (as: Array[Array[Int]])Array[Array[Int]]

scala> Array(Array(0, 1), Array(2, 3))
res0: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(0, 1), Array(2, 3))

scala> copyOf(res0)
res1: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(0, 1), Array(2, 3))

scala> res0(0)(0) = 7

scala> res0
res3: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(7, 1), Array(2, 3))

scala> res1
res4: Array[Array[Int]] = Array(Array(0, 1), Array(2, 3))
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Yes, more efficient when comparing with currently accepted version. –  Andriy Plokhotnyuk Mar 30 '13 at 7:07
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