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I have the following slideshow code:

HTML

<div id="slideshow"><img src="common/images/background/Slide1b.jpg" />
   <img src="common/images/background/Slide2b.jpg" />
   <img src="common/images/background/Slide3b.jpg" />
   <img src="common/images/background/Slide4b.jpg" />
</div>

jQuery

var opt1 = 1;
$(document).ready(function() {

    $('#slideshow').supersize();
    all_images = $('#slideshow > img');
    all_images.hide();

    first = $('#slideshow > img:eq(0)');
    first.show().attr('class', 'power');

    setInterval(function() { 
        var total = $('#slideshow > img').length;

            if(opt1 < total) {
                var current = $('.power');
                var next = $('.power').next();              

                current.removeClass('power').fadeOut('slow');
                next.fadeIn('slow').addClass('power');

                ++opt1;
            } else {
                opt1 = 1;
                all_images.removeClass('power').fadeOut('slow');
                first.addClass('power').fadeIn('slow');             
            }
    }, 2000);       

});

It is working fine in all other browsers except in Google Chrome it fires only once.

share|improve this question
    
Try var all_images = $('#slideshow > img'); instead of all_images = $('#slideshow > img'); –  Mr_Green Mar 28 '13 at 12:50
1  
have you got any errors in chrome inspector console? –  mithunsatheesh Mar 28 '13 at 12:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

This is a working answer, I dont know why chrome likes setTimeout better then setInterval, but it does. I also use .animate instead of .fadeIn and .fadeOut.

$(document).ready(function()
{
    $('#slideshow').supersize();
    var images = $('#slideshow>img');
    images.css('opacity', 0)

    var first = images.eq(0);
    first.css('opacity', 1).addClass('power');

    setTimeout(on_timer, 2000);

    function on_timer()
    {
       var current = $('.power');
       var next = $('.power').next();       

       if (next.length == 0)
          next = first;

       current.removeClass('power').animate({opacity: 0}, 1000);
       next.css('opacity', 0).animate({opacity: 1}, 1000).addClass('power');

       setTimeout(on_timer, 2000);
    }
});

Demo on

http://62.168.145.82/slideshow/
share|improve this answer
$(document).ready(function() {
    $('#slideshow').supersize();
    var images = $('#slideshow>img');
    images.hide();

    var first = images.eq(0);     // get the first image
    first.show().addClass('power');

    setInterval(function() {                
       var current = $('.power');
       var next = $('.power').next();           

       if (next.length == 0)  // we are in the end
          next = first;       // use the first image as "next"

       current.removeClass('power').fadeOut('slow');
       next.fadeIn('slow').addClass('power');
    }, 2000);       

});
share|improve this answer
    
is the OP supposed to play "spot the difference" ? –  Alnitak Mar 28 '13 at 13:47
    
Please, tell me what you mean –  Anders Lindén Mar 28 '13 at 13:51
    
I mean that it's inappropriate to just dump in a chunk of code without explaining why it works better than the OP's. –  Alnitak Mar 28 '13 at 13:53
    
Oh, sorry, I thought it was self explanatory. I will comment it a bit. –  Anders Lindén Mar 28 '13 at 13:59
    
I added some comments, but I really dont find something to explain –  Anders Lindén Mar 28 '13 at 14:02

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