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In Java, is there any way to initialize a field before the super constructor runs?

Even the ugliest hacks I can come up with are rejected by the compiler:

class Base
{
    Base(String someParameter)
    {
        System.out.println(this);
    }
}

class Derived extends Base
{
    private final int a;

    Derived(String someParameter)
    {
        super(hack(someParameter, a = getValueFromDataBase()));
    }

    private static String hack(String returnValue, int ignored)
    {
        return returnValue;
    }

    public String toString()
    {
        return "a has value " + a;
    }
}

Note: The issue disappeared when I switched from inheritance to delegation, but I would still like to know.

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1  
are you trying to pre-initialize field a? –  Woot4Moo Mar 28 '13 at 13:02
1  
I don't think you can do this. Any initialization you do in a class (even if it is outside the constructor) is moved to every constructor after the super call. So, the super constructor is always run before the field initialization. –  Rohit Jain Mar 28 '13 at 13:05
4  
@FredOverflow since a is only accessible in Derived, why does it matter that it gets initialised before super() is called? Initialising it right after does not make a difference in the example your provide (unless you call an overriden method from the Base constructor, which begins to smell quite fishy). –  assylias Mar 28 '13 at 13:07
1  
Effective Java Item 17: "Constructors must not invoke overridable methods, directly or indirectly (...) If the overriding method depends on any initialization performed by the subclass constructor, the method will not behave as expected." –  assylias Mar 28 '13 at 13:11
1  
Ugly Hack: Create the Derived class directly in java bytecode as in this answer: stackoverflow.com/questions/3278865/… –  Jörn Horstmann Mar 28 '13 at 14:13

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

No, there is no way to do this.

According to the language specs, instance variables aren't even initialized until a super() call has been made.

These are the steps performed during the constructor step of class instance creation, taken from the link:

  1. Assign the arguments for the constructor to newly created parameter variables for this constructor invocation.
  2. If this constructor begins with an explicit constructor invocation (§8.8.7.1) of another constructor in the same class (using this), then evaluate the arguments and process that constructor invocation recursively using these same five steps. If that constructor invocation completes abruptly, then this procedure completes abruptly for the same reason; otherwise, continue with step 5.
  3. This constructor does not begin with an explicit constructor invocation of another constructor in the same class (using this). If this constructor is for a class other than Object, then this constructor will begin with an explicit or implicit invocation of a superclass constructor (using super). Evaluate the arguments and process that superclass constructor invocation recursively using these same five steps. If that constructor invocation completes abruptly, then this procedure completes abruptly for the same reason. Otherwise, continue with step 4.
  4. Execute the instance initializers and instance variable initializers for this class, assigning the values of instance variable initializers to the corresponding instance variables, in the left-to-right order in which they appear textually in the source code for the class. If execution of any of these initializers results in an exception, then no further initializers are processed and this procedure completes abruptly with that same exception. Otherwise, continue with step 5.
  5. Execute the rest of the body of this constructor. If that execution completes abruptly, then this procedure completes abruptly for the same reason. Otherwise, this procedure completes normally.
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I got a way to do this.

class Derived extends Base
{
    private final int a;

    // make this method private
    private Derived(String someParameter,
                    int tmpVar /*add an addtional parameter*/) {
        // use it as a temprorary variable
        super(hack(someParameter, tmpVar = getValueFromDataBase()));
        // assign it to field a
        a = tmpVar;
    }

    // show user a clean constructor
    Derived(String someParameter)
    {   
        this(someParameter, 0)
    }

    ...
}
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As others have said, you can't initialize the instance field before calling the superclass constructor. And you don't need to, because you can't use that field until after the superclass constructor is completed.

But there are workarounds. One is to create a factory class that gets the value and passes it to the Derived class's constructor.

class DerivedFactory {
    Derived makeDerived( String someParameter ) {
        int a = getValueFromDataBase();
        return new Derived( someParameter, a );
    }
}


class Derived extends Base
{
    private final int a;

    Derived(String someParameter, int a0 ) {
        super(hack(someParameter, a0));
        a = a0;
    }
    ...
}
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Super constructor will run in any case, but since we are talking about the "ugliest hacks", we can take advantage of this

public class Base {
    public Base() {
        init();
    }

    public Base(String s) {
    }

    public void init() {
    //this is the ugly part that will be overriden
    }
}

class Derived extends Base{

    @Override
    public void init(){
        a = getValueFromDataBase();
    }
} 

I never suggest using these kind of hacks.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think that works in Java, and for good reason. Looking for reference... –  Andy Thomas Mar 28 '13 at 13:22
    
That works, tested... –  Serkan Arıkuşu Mar 28 '13 at 13:29
1  
+1 - You're right. Ick. I was thinking of C++. Still -- I don't think the hack is necessary - see my answer. –  Andy Thomas Mar 28 '13 at 13:32
    
This isn't really before the super constructor runs, as OP asked. Probably the closest you can get though. –  Keppil Mar 28 '13 at 14:19
    
@Keppil I mentioned in the answer "Super constructor will run in any case", this just a hack to initialize a variable in the derived class –  Serkan Arıkuşu Mar 28 '13 at 14:47

It's prohibited by the Java language specification (section 8.8.7):

The first statement of a constructor body may be an explicit invocation of another constructor of the same class or of the direct superclass.

The constructor body should look like this:

ConstructorBody:

{ ExplicitConstructorInvocationopt BlockStatementsopt }
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